Hypothetical Scratch Build

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Let's assume I'm planning a scratch build of a POF ship at a larger scale (1:32). Not a frigate, but a schooner or a cutter. Not a cross section, but a fully framed model. Lets also assume I have ample supple of the classic model building woods: Boxwood, swiss pear, holly, beech, ebony and the usual bloodwood, yellow heart, maple, red heart etc. I'm, asking for hypothetical suggestions for the stem, keel sternpost, deck framing, bulwark planking etc. Assume all the frames will be boxwood. Any thoughts? (Hypothetically speaking!) ;););)
 

Dave Stevens (Lumberyard)

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(Hypothetically speaking!)

this would have to be thought of as a "model" and not how a real ship was built because all kinds of wood was used in the construction for example the lower floors and first futtocks were White Oak but the upper parts of the frames might of been Cedar to keep the weight down. Decks were Pine deck beams were anything handy Walnut, Beech, Maple

for a model I would keep all the "timbering the same wood. if the frames are Boxwood I would keep the back bone the same keel, stem deck beams. I would not go for a stark contrast maybe something like natural pearwood for the keel, stem stern post and boxwood frames and deck beams.

I would make the planking different from the timbering

there are 2 schools of thought on this
1 is to keep all the wood the same or to a minimum this give the model a cohesive look and the viewer tends to focus on the model as a whole, it also shows off the workmanship

2 using all different contrasting woods for timbering, caprails, planking etc tends to break up the model and the viewer is jumping from one thing to another.
it is a matter of personal taste

I try to keep the model within the same color lighter and darker but pretty much the same I do not use a bright contrast like Bloodwood. I will use texture more than color
 

Uwek

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An austrian friend of mine is also planing an entire 1:48 scale POF model of the HMS Royal George in boxwood
 
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I prefer boxwood for all of the basic framing for a POF scratch build. After that, you could then "sculpt" the build using various woods for color, grain or contrast...such as ebony for the wales or mahagony for the outer planking as others suggest. I like working with boxwood for the basic structure...it is a good consistent color, no visible grain, cuts easily, has good strength, and takes stain well if you decide, for example, to give it more of an oak coloring. Have hypothetical fun!
 
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Why not start with the Kingfisher kit since you already have, it would have been nice to see a build log of how
you solve the challenges along the way of constructing this beautiful ship.
Can you tell what type of wood is included with the kit and if you are thinking of using / replacing with other varieties of wood.
Regards-
 
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Sorry to be so late in responding, Knut. The kit is mostly boxwood. Please check out Ted’s excellent build log of this model:

 
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No problem Dave, trouser boom is a very nice wood species which can be seen in Ted's construction log, his model is at least very pretty.
 
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