Model Shipways Bluenose, 1/64 scale by Hightflight

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Jul 13, 2020
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Moncton NB Canada
Welcome to the Bluenose build. This ship is the famous racing schooner that appears on the Canadian dime. This kit is from Model Shipways and is 1/64 scale. I started the build my first on May 25, 2017 and have so far found the challenge very rewarding. First, I laid the keel and made sure all was straight then I cut the rabbit along the bottom of the keel. Next was positioning the bulkheads and made sure that they were perpendicular to the keel and straight. My next task was to sand the bulkheads that required shaping in order to ensure that all planks would sit flat on the bulkheads. Following this step, I glued and shaped the stern blocks according to the plans. Then the Horn timbers in the stern were completed. Next I installed the Waterway planks, which need to be installed before the fake stanchions. The next challenge was to complete all the stanchions, which I found difficult at the beginning, as I was, not cutting them straight but, with some practice I was able to finish, prime and paint these. It is better to have these stanchions a little longer than too short, which required removal and re cut. The next task was to install the Haws timbers, Knighthead and Cable chafe blocks. Once this was complete, I was able to make the main rail for both port and starboard sides. I used a piece of cherry 1/16 thick cut from a piece of cherry veneer. This seemed a better way to complete the main rail as the kit included stock, which would require gluing three pieces together in order to give me enough length to fabricate the rail in one piece except for the stern and the bow pieces. Before gluing the main rail in place, I completed the bulwarks as well as the cutting out of the scupper holes. Before installing the main rail, I cut out the slots for the chain plates, as they need to be close to the exterior of the hull, this also makes them close to the outer edge of the main rail. Then it was time to permanently install the main rail. I planked the section of the stern decking as this portion runs from port to starboard. Following this, the hull planking was initiated. This process took some time and can be tedious and a fairly long process about 44 hours. Each plank was treated as a separate task being careful to stagger each plank so that there are three strakes before you start planking on the same bulkhead. You must also ensure that you butt up to the previous plank as well as alternate from side to side in order to prevent distorting or warping of the hull. I used various clamps, and close pins in order to ensure that the strakes were tight to the previous row. I used a syringe filled with lepages wood glue to apply the glue to the planking only occasionally did I use CA glue as I realized that I was allergic to the regular version and switched to the odorless version of it. I also used pins to hold the strakes to each bulkhead while they dried. In order to keep the glue in the syringe from drying and blocking the flow I took a used pill bottle drilled a hole in the top and filled it with water. By keeping the syringe immersed in this bottle I could leave it there for up to one month without it drying out.

The decking was next which was started in the center and I worked from side to side completing the stern first followed by the bow section. In order to imitate caulking between each plank I used a black wax crayon in order to darken both edges. I decided to use full lengths of planking and did not cut or scribe the planking in order to simulate shorter planks, as we are all aware that they did not use planks that were in excess of 60 ft. on the real Bluenose. You will notice that I did nibbling on each plank as it meets the waterway plank. There are several other ways to achieve this look. The next step was to sand the deck and the hull. I did use a little filler on the hull only. I now have over 120 hours logged since the start of the build.

Once the decking completed, I started to work on completing the main rail at the stern. Be careful to install the “Main sheet boom buffer” which is under the stern main rail before you complete the stern main rail. Next came the main rail and the Buffalo rail at the bow. Now it was time to bend and install the Monkey rail at the stern. This can take some time to bend and align the holes for the chain plates, which run through both the Main rail as well as the Monkey rail.

Progress on my Bluenose build.

I have now stained and varnished the deck, with a mat water base varnish, completed the main rail as well as the monkey and the buffalo rails, drilled and installed the hawse pipe trim pieces at the bow.

I have also installed the mooring chocks at the stern. I drilled the holes and then covered them with a small piece of brass, in order to have them stand out. I have made several attempts at making chain plates.

My next project will be to install the fashion pieces at the stern. Following this I will prime the hull...

Keil.jpgKeil 1.jpgKeil 2.jpgKeil 3.jpgStern.jpgPlanking 1.jpgPlanking 2.jpgPlanking 3.jpgPlanking 4.jpgPlanking 5.jpgPlanking 6.jpgPlanking 7.jpgPlanking 8.jpgPlanking 9.jpgDecking 1.jpgDecking 2.jpgDecking 3.jpgdecking 4.jpgDecking 5.jpgDecking 6.jpgDecking 7.jpgDecking 8.jpgDecking 9.jpgDecking 10.jpgDecking 11.jpg
 
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Joined
Jul 13, 2020
Messages
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Location
Moncton NB Canada
Here are more pictures of the Bluenose build. During the decking process I decided to include a few items inside the hull. These Items included a Canadian penny, a Canadian dime with the picture of the Bluenose on it, a Canadian 2017 Nickel the year I started the build. I also included a time capsule with information about myself. I will post more on the build soon.


Dime.jpgTime Capsul 1.jpgHull Primed.jpgHull Black 3.jpgHull Painted 1.jpgHull Painted 2.jpgHull Painted 3.jpgHull Painted 4.jpgHull Painted 5.jpgHull Painted 6.jpgWaterline 1.jpgWaterline 2.jpgWaterline 3.jpgWaterline tool.jpg
 
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Great paint job and off to a good start. I like your idea of including the coins on the deck. I built this same model a few years ago. Here is my log if you would like to see it...

 
Joined
Jul 13, 2020
Messages
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Location
Moncton NB Canada
Here is the latest update on the Bluenose build, starting with work on the deck furniture. I used a combination of cherry and walnut and started with the main companionway trying to get to scale as well as appealing with the different woods. On some pieces it took me several tries in order to get it done. Starting with the companionway door and hatch. I tried installing door panels, door hinges and door handles. This took me some time, as the pieces are small. The next step was to create some sort of railing on both sides of the structure along with the compass cover. The skylight was a long process with several attempts. I wanted to install glass and some grating on the skylight. I used the bottom of a clear blue container cut two pieces one for either side with small strips less than 1mm in size I sandwiched the upper and bottom framing and drilled small holes so that they would match and used small brass wire to create the grating. Next were the two hatches and the steering box, which also took several tries, as I wanted to somehow create the paneling on the sides of the steering box. In order to achieve this, I used a soldering iron and burned the panel shape on the sides and installed the wheel. As I progressed forward, I completed the forward skylight and the front hatch and used small pieces of brass in order to give the look of small handles on the two panels. Next was the construction of the engine hoisting box and chain box and tried to create three hinges.

As you can see, I decided to build a small round hopper described in the plans as an unidentified object. Using a piece of brass tubing and a leftover base from the laser cut mast hoops. I made some small buoys and just inserted them in the hopper just to add a bit of fishing gear.

At this stage the deck furniture and fittings where 95% complete. I decided to build and install only two dories on the deck instead of the eight provides. While building the dories I realized that they would look too plain and decided to add some details including planking the sides with overlap boards, oars, lines, small fishing buoys and markers. At this stage it was time to permanently install all the deck furniture and dories.

Hatch 1.jpgHatch 2.jpgSkylight.jpgSteering box.jpgGrating.jpgFife rail.jpgDeck forward.jpgDeck aft.jpgHatch 1.jpgHatch 2.jpgSkylight.jpgSteering box.jpgChain gard.jpgCompanionway.jpgDeck.jpgBuoys.jpgStern .jpgStern2.jpgWheel box side.jpgWinch box.jpgCabin aft.jpgCabin side.jpgWheel box side.jpg
 

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Joined
Jul 13, 2020
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Location
Moncton NB Canada
I was now trying to make two different types of small turnbuckles, one round type and one square type in order to get things ready for completing the bowsprit. I used two small pieces of brass tubing with small brass eyehooks at each end and epoxied them together. As you can see, they don’t look too bad. Now to create the other type I used two small strips for the sides, two small pieces of brass tubing and two eyehooks for the ends. I made a small jig in order to solder these parts together.

It was time to mount the anchors and catheads. After looking at the Britannia fittings, I realized that I would need to create my own version, something a little stronger, as the ones included were not only flimsy but also useless. In completing this I used some 19-gauge black wire, soldered some brass strips one on either side in order to create the top portion with the ability to drill holes in order to mount the chain and the line through a sheave at the top of the catheads. On the port and starboard side I ran the anchor chain up through the hawse pipe and around the winch. I completed the winch gear cover by bending a piece of brass and soldering a small extension in order to attach it to the side of the Samson post.

Turnbuckle 1.jpgTurnbuckle 2.jpgTurnbuckle 3.jpgTurnbuckle jig.jpgAnchor 1.jpgAnchor 2.jpgCathead 2.jpgCathead 3.jpgCathead top.jpgWinch box.jpgWinch guard.jpg
 
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Joined
Jul 13, 2020
Messages
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Location
Moncton NB Canada
My next step was to construct the main mast followed by the fore mast. I started with the main mast, as it looked simpler. I cut the bottom and the top portions and installed the trestletree and spreaders. As for the bands, I used brass tubing and cut them at 2.mm I drilled and installed eyebolts as needed. All other fittings on the mast were made from brass rod and soldered in order to create fittings like the gooseneck, bails and mast cap. I made another small jig in order to solder the mast cap together. I used two different sizes of brass tubing and joined them together with solder. I managed to add a small recessed brass ring around the pin saddle by cutting a larger ring. It would have been too small if I had used the two-laser cut halves included. This allowed more room for the belaying pins and the brass ring. Instead of creating a mast coat I used brass mast steps in order to finish the base of the mast. I tried several attempts at making the mast trucks, which is a small base for the gilt ball at the top of the mast. I tried shaping a piece of dowel, which didn’t work as it would split. Next was using a hole punch and some thin plywood and left-over basswood from the kit. This also split when I tried to file it to size. What did work was the punch method by using 1/16 cherry as this allowed me to shape it and drill the holes for the halyards. A small pin with a white head was installed for the Gilt Ball. Completing the fore mast was a little more challenging, as there were many more fittings and moving parts made from brass rod.

IMG_0933.jpgIMG_0934.jpgIMG_0935.jpgIMG_0939.jpgIMG_0940.jpgMast cap.jpgMast rings.jpgSpreaders.jpgGilt ball and Trucks.jpgTruck with Gilt ball.jpg
 
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My next task was building the booms. The plans called for a 1/8-inch dowel for the fore gaff, Jumbo Jib boom, and the fore boom, I found this too small and decided to use a 5/32-inch dowel instead. This was much easier to work with and much stronger. I used a 3/16 dowel for the main gaff instead of the 5/32. The main boom is 15/64 supplied with the kit. As for the stain, I used a combination of stains on all the masts as well as on the booms. Stains included Colonial American Minwax, # 230 and Golden Oak Minwax #210B. This allowed me to achieve the color I wanted. These pieces were finished with three coats of gloss varnish then burnished with paper towel. The plans showed two sheaves inserted inside and towards the end of the main boom. I could have just used a small hole with a small piece of brass in order to create the illusion of these sheaves. I considered the possibility of actually making a couple of sheaves. I started out by cutting out 2 rectangular openings in the dowel. Following this I used two small rivets by first removing the nail and then cutting off the shaft. Now I had two saucer shaped pieces that I soldered together. Next I drilled out the center in order to insert a 3/32 OD brass tube, this allowed me to insert another 3/64 OD brass tube inside the first one in order to accept a piece of .032 brass rod as a shaft. In order to finish the area around the two sheaves, I used some thin mahogany left over from the material used to make the two dories.

Fore boom.jpgJumbo jib boom.jpgMain Boom Sheaves.jpgSheave 1.jpgSheave 3.jpgSheave 4.jpgSheave 5.jpgSheaves.jpgSheves 2.jpgBoom sheves.jpg
 
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Jul 13, 2020
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At this stage, I am in the process of making an acrylic case in order to protect the model once I start the rigging.

I managed to complete a display case for my model of the Bluenose. I wanted to complete the case before I continued with the rigging. Due to being away for extended periods, I wanted to protect the model from accumulating too much dust. The first step was to determine the size required. This was larger than you may think as it needed to accommodate the completed model. It ended up being 36 inches in length, 32 inches high and a width of 9- and one-half inches. I added two handles to the ends in order to help maneuver the cover which is quite awkward to move because of its size and weight. I used a piece of plywood for the base and added maple molding around the base in order to finish the edges. I covered the base with blue felt, added lights and a piece of Nova Scotia Tartan to acknowledge the Canadian Province where the Bluenose was built in 1921. A good friend was able to provide me with a piece of authenticated wood removed from the Bluenose II while it was being repaired. With this, I turned a handle for a letter opener and included it in the display. Case.jpgIMG_0369.jpg
Case.jpgIMG_0369.jpgIMG_1371.jpgAttachment.jpgAttachment 2.jpg
I decided to secure the hull to the cradle by making two half hinges by soldering a piece of tubing to a brass plate. After reinforcing the hull in this area with some fibreglass I inserted a smaller brass tube through the bracket and through the hull. Now the ship and the case will be all one unit once installed.

Thank you for your comments together with your interest and I hope you are enjoying the diary.
 
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It was now time to start the rigging. I started by attaching the standing rigging to the masts. Next was completing the rigging to the bowsprit. At this time, I decided to add a few details to the deck including some fishing gear and barrels. With the standing rigging now attached it was time to start the running rigging. I cut, waxed all lines and added the various blocks to each of the rigging lines. I then labeled most of the running rigging which was now ready to be installed. I did not use the blocks provided with the kit. I was able to locate different sizes of blocks with interior stropping from Bluejacket. I also did not like the rigging rope included with the kit. I purchased all my rigging line, in different sizes from Syren Ship Model Company.

Chain Plates.jpgIMG_0383.jpgIMG_0385.jpgIMG_0386.jpgIMG_0613.jpgMain Boom.jpgMain Gaff.jpgMain Sail.jpgReady.jpgReady 2.jpgRigging 1.jpg
 
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Making sails was the next task. At this stage I have decided to include some sails furled as well as some hoisted. The reason I did this was so I would not hide a large portion of the rigging. I will also have both the main and fore gaffs hoisted, which would not be the case with the main and fore sails furled. I started by making patterns for all the sails. I decided to make the sails from Silkspan as I found the material in the kit to be too heavy. I painted the Silkspan with some acrylic paint and let it dry. I transferred the sail patterns and cut the painted Silkspan and added the sail seams on both sides with a pencil. I added strips of the sail material to all edges on both sides to make the sails a bit stronger. After this I added a ring to each corner of the sail to use as cringles. In order to do this, I attached a short line to the ring using white glue to attach the ring and line to the corner of the sail and covered the line with a gusset on both sides of the sail in order to strengthen these points. I now needed to find some way to attach the sails to the stays and masts. For the sail to mast attachment I used hanks made from wire and 3mm antique brass rings in order to secure the jibs to the stays. In order to prevent the sails from tearing on the edges, I decided to add another strip of material to all the edges. I incorporated a piece of line and glued these strips by folding them over the outside edges of the sails. This worked well and allowed me to insert the hanks, and rings without damaging the edges of the sails. I also used this method to attach some fairleads to both the main and fore topsails. The sails were now ready to be installed.

Gusset Start.jpgStart Gusset.jpgGusset end.jpgAnother Gusset.jpgFairlead.jpgAdding Fairleads 1.jpgFairleads 1.jpgFairleads 2.jpgFairleads 3.jpgFairleads 4.jpgFairleads 5.jpgFairleads 6.jpgFairleads 7.jpgFairleads 8.jpgAdd Ring.jpgAttaching hanks 1.jpgAttaching Hanks 2.jpgAttaching Hanks 3.jpgSail Lashed to Boom.jpgFairlead to Main Topsail.jpgMain + Hanks.jpgMain sheet.jpgFitting Jumbo Jib.jpg
 
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Time to step the Masts. After agonizing over whether to just step the masts and secure with the stays and shrouds, I decided to glue the masts in place with epoxy.

The main mast is raked at 3 degrees and the fore mast at 0 degrees. I made sure the masts were both aligned with the center of the ship by attaching a weighted line to each side of the spreaders at the same distance from the center, I projected these same measurements to the deck which confirmed that both masts were in alignment and perpendicular.

This is the latest on my Bluenose build. Since the beginning May 25, 2017 I have logged 623 hours. It has been a long process and at times slow either due to being away together with this being my first build. I am on the final stretch and will share the completed build in my next update.

Getting Ready.jpgMast Raked 3 deg.jpgMasts set.jpgStepping Mast 1.jpgStepping Mast 2.jpgStepping Mast 3.jpg
 
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Aug 4, 2019
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Exquisite added details! I am totaling stealing your ideas for my Bluenose build. Of course, I am a rank noob, and you clearly are not, but I hope that I can do as well as you are. Keep up the awesome work and thank you for sharing this great build.
 
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Time to step the Masts. After agonizing over whether to just step the masts and secure with the stays and shrouds, I decided to glue the masts in place with epoxy.

The main mast is raked at 3 degrees and the fore mast at 0 degrees. I made sure the masts were both aligned with the center of the ship by attaching a weighted line to each side of the spreaders at the same distance from the center, I projected these same measurements to the deck which confirmed that both masts were in alignment and perpendicular.

This is the latest on my Bluenose build. Since the beginning May 25, 2017 I have logged 623 hours. It has been a long process and at times slow either due to being away together with this being my first build. I am on the final stretch and will share the completed build in my next update.

View attachment 164470View attachment 164471View attachment 164472View attachment 164473View attachment 164474View attachment 164475
I read your blog and the photos you attached , this is very nice & impressive models. Well done
 
Joined
Jul 13, 2020
Messages
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Points
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Location
Moncton NB Canada
Update on my Bluenose build:
After stepping the masts, I needed to complete the actual rigging. As I had previously created and labelled most of the rigging lines with their various tackle, all that remained was to attach these to the ship. I found that some needed to be redone as they were not long enough or needed modifications. I would suggest that when constructing the rigging don’t skimp on the line. Yes, it is expensive, but it is better than having to remake and waste even more line. A brief note on the Blue Jacket blocks I used. The rigging plans called for various sizes of blocks anywhere from 3/32 to 7/32. I upsized most blocks by one size with the largest being ¼ with the smallest at 1/8. The 3/32 blocks were virtually impossible to deal with. The sizes I used were 1/8, 3/16, 7/32 and 1/4. All blocks were drilled, sanded, cleaned with acetone and painted brown.Blocks.jpg
 
Joined
Jul 13, 2020
Messages
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Location
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The first sail to install was the main which I had already down sized to 1/3 of the original as I wanted to furl it. I think 2/3 the size would have been ok as well. Next I lashed the sail to the boom by simply starting at one end and weaving the line through the sail and around the boom. I had researched pictures of the Bluenose and found two different versions of this attachment with some being tied and others lashed. I had created some metal hanks from thin wire by first cutting a piece of this at 2 inches bent at 90 degrees and inserted into pre spaced holes in the sail. I then bent the wire through the top of the mast hoops making sure I had all at 3/16 of an inch. Next I curled the wire up in order to attach it to the mast hoops. I was concerned with this as I was afraid of tearing the edge of the sail and or braking the fragile mast hoops. It all worked well and in little time I had the main sail attached. I did the same with the fore sail, main top sail and the fore topsail. The only difference with the topsails is that I started with the bottom of the sail and fed this from top to bottom. It was now time to furl the main and fore sail by first spraying a little water on the sail and slowly forming them into a furled position on the booms. The water helped soften the Silkspan and allowed me to create a descent furled look.
Sail hanks step 1.jpgHanks step 2.jpgHanks step 3.jpgHanks step 4.jpgHanks Step 5.jpgHanks Step 6.jpgHanks Step 7.jpgMain Topsail hanks.jpgFore topsail hanks 2.jpgBoth Topsails hanked.jpgMain sail furled.jpgFore sail furled.jpgWire in sail.jpg
I installed the 3mm rings on the Jumbo jib, Jib and the balloon jib. As previously discussed, I had inserted a piece of line inside the leading edge (the luff) in order to provide some strength for the rings over 72 of them. I was able to thread the fore stay, jib stay and Balloon jib stay’s through the rings and secure them and furl the jumbo jib even though it was full size and not reduced to 1/3. Silkspan once painted is surprisingly strong and fairly easy to shape. I wanted to create the illusion of wind in the sails, so I decided to install a thin 30 gauge copper wire in the edge of the main top sail, fore top sail, Jib as well as the balloon jib. This allowed me to shape the edge of the sail into what appears to be filled with wind, the wire helps the sail maintain its shape.Sail shaped.jpgBoth Topsails hanked.jpg
 
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