Mouses

Donnie

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I only have an idea or two. For one thing, what is the scale of ship. If small ship, you might can get by with a cone shape made of wood as it would represent a mouse. If the ship is larger, then you could possibly find some black fabric (like the texture of sheet linen) that you can see the weave. I would wrap the mouse with this as it would give the impression that the mouse had rope weaving.. since the mouse has a hole all the way through, you can tuck the fabric ends there. Even on a large ship that is about 35" long, just a plain painted mouse would work. I guess it depends on the detail you wish to put into it.
 

shipbuilder

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Thanks - The nearest British equivalent is Baggwrinkle, but not all that much of it used in the type of sailing ships that interest me! never heard it called mouses, but have recollections of mousing a line.
Bob
 

paulv1958

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Here a link to MSW
 

Bob Ellis

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Thanks - The nearest British equivalent is Baggwrinkle, but not all that much of it used in the type of sailing ships that interest me! never heard it called mouses, but have recollections of mousing a line.
Bob
Hello Bob. Baggy wrinkles are to prevent the rigging chafing on the sail. Knotted string like a floor mop. We also call the 'stopper' a mouse. Darcy Lever. "The pointing of the mouse is sometimes continued for a little distance down the stay, for neatness; but in this case, a piece of parcelling should be placed just below the Mouse, that the Knittles may not be chafed by the eye". So now we know???
 

shipbuilder

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Thanks. Sounds like something common to ancient ships, as I have never come across it with late 19th century iron and steel square riggers. Never heard of knittles either.
Bob
 

shipbuilder

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That is true, but I don't think they even used them in big iron and steel ships. I have looked in all my reference books, and not seen them mentioned anywhere! A different era!
 

Bob Ellis

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That is true, but I don't think they even used them in big iron and steel ships. I have looked in all my reference books, and not seen them mentioned anywhere! A different era!
I have seen images with them on square sails, all merchantmen. Though I spend a vast amount of time searching (Artwork!)
 

Bob Ellis

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Thanks. Sounds like something common to ancient ships, as I have never come across it with late 19th century iron and steel square riggers. Never heard of knittles either.
Bob
Haven't looked for those yet. I might have an old maritime encyclopaedia?
 

paulv1958

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Stay mouse


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The nautical term "stay mouse" refers to an antiquated part of a sailing vessel's standing rigging. On all sailing ships built before about the 19th century, the stays were of natural cords. These lines were looped around the top of each section of the wooden masts using a spliced loop or seized loop in their ends. During the 16th century some riggers began to attach stays by splicing or seizing only a small loop into the end of the stay then passing the rope's tail around the mast and back through the small loop, like a slip-knot. To prevent this from slipping tightly around the mast when in use, a strong bulge was built into the standing part of the rope that could not fit through the small loop. This bulge was called a mouse or stay mouse.
As first galvanised and then stainless steel standing rigging replaced natural fibres, and steel and aluminium replaced wood for masts, the need for these niceties died out. Knowledge of, and interest in, these technologies is kept alive by classic boat and historic ship enthusiasts, as well as by model makers the world over.
 

shipbuilder

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Thanks for info - not an era that I have any interest in, so that explains me never having heard of them!
Bob
 
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