PRINTZ FRIDERICH (1761 - 1780) - danish 70-gun Ship of the Line - 1:48 by Karl I. Malcha

JosephH

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#30
Awesome workmanship. A lot of the crisp edges and clean looking wood is acheived with sanding sealer on every piece before glued together as you can then sand all those ugly hairs off the wood. we do that on cabinets.
 

Uwek

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#31
Sorry, that I did not continue with this topic during the last weeks, but I was very busy with the Rochefort event and all related posts and communication.
As I mentioned earlier in this topic I received directly from the modeler Karl Ingwer some photos he made during the construction of this model.....so I will continue with the information

The frame construction - (happy to see, that Karl I. is also using a glass plate like myself)
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The first group of frames prepared and roughly sanded
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The first frames upside down installed with the keel. Keep a look at the very solid jig
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all frames installed and outside sanded -
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The stern structure with fashion pieces etc
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and the bow
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to be continued .......
 

Uwek

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#34
Several years of work were necessary to get the model like I was able to see in Hamburg.
And off course also one or the other Christmases

a closer view on the stern structure of the Printz Friderich
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The wales and the upper outside planking installed, in order to get enough stability into the hull - still upside down installed in the jig.
the gunports cut out already
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The hull of the Printz Friderich is now rigid enough to turn and to start with the inside planking.
It was also possible to cut out the areas of the frames, in order to get a later view into the hull structure to see parts of the interieur (see on the right side)
Every third frame is kept, so the "windows" are 2 frames wide
L1000015.JPG

To be continued ......
 

Uwek

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#36
Some more photos in the order of construction the interieur of the 70-gun Printz Friderich

Finished inside planking with the installed floor riders - remarkable is the fact, that the raiders are usually only three elements, with only one center element directly over the keelson at the area of the limber board.
On the right hand side you can see the openings cut into the frames
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a first installed storage room and the first deck beams over the hold, one floor rider visible on the left
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Interesting here to see the installed knees for the deck beams of the hold, the first installed deck beam of the Orlop deck
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to be continued .....
 

Uwek

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#38
Here is a link to video of the wreck
If you are interested you can read more on www.undervandsgruppen.dk

The translation on the website, is translated by goggle, if you click on the flags. But i hope you can understand it
Many thanks for this very interesting film and the official announcement of the wreckfinding.
And also we are very happy, that somehow we were able to help, that you got the contact to the modelbuilder Karl I. Malcha.
And I feel personally honored, that you used my photos of Karl´s model I made personally during the days in Hamburg, in the film and your web-page.
 

Uwek

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#39
With One of the last photos I showed already some first internal installments
L1000668.JPG

It is the coal-storage (with the stairs) and behind in appr. the same size the pump-pit of the main mast.
on the left and right the boxes for the cannonballs. located as close as possible to the main mast foot.
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This photos is showing the second pump-pit at the mizzenmast. You can recon already the holes for the pump-foot left and right of the keelson
L1000657.JPG

To be continued .........
 

Uwek

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#40
The Printz Friderich found now also the way to get a place at wikipedia, unfortunately in the norwegian page, but google can help here (somehow).
Maybe one of our scandinavian members could take a look and correct the translation into english?


This is the link to wikipedia norway with the Printz Friderich:
https://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/«Printz_Friderich»_(1761)

And here the google-translation (with some corrections already by myself) of the text:

«Printz Friderich» (1761)

"Printz Friderich" was a three-masted ship of the line, launched on November 7, 1761 as the first of a class of three ships; "Norske Løve" and "Caroline Mathilde", built and launched on Nyholmen under the direction of Frederich Michael Krabbe, as master of the shipyard. Krabbe, which had been in its mission from 1758 to 1772, was responsible forship construction with its shipbuilding skills, that he achieved during study trips abroad. In his time of responsibility 14 ships of the line were launched, including "Printz Friderich".

As a two-decker ship of the line, "Printz Friderich" had a 70-guns on two decks, with a crew of 667 men when fully equiped. During the period of peace in the 1700s, it was common to have the decommissioned ships on board the Fleet's Rental under Nyholm, so that they can be equipped and prepared with artillery and rigging taken from the country side. It was normal for "Printz Friderich" to be equipped a few times in his career. During a fall storm, the ship wrecked on 28 September 1780 at Læsø , The complete crew with the exception of 8 were rescued. The wreck was discovered with subsequent publication of the wreck find on November 13, 2018.

History
At the launch in November 1761, "Printz Friderich" was the second 70-passenger shipwreck in Krabbe's career. A typical characteristic of his ships was that they were slightly larger than average and thus messy within their class compared to older ships. This was not without criticism as it meant major construction costs for the Danish state budget. His biggest critic was Danneskiold-Samsøe, who returned to the Danish-Norwegian naval navy as an administrator in 1772. Krabbe went from his position in favor of Henrik Gerner, who proved to be an excellent ship designer.

"Printz Friderich" was equipped for the first time for war effort in 1770 when war between Denmark and Norway and the North African Barbarian State of Alger broke out. Together with an escort, the shipwreck ship to the Mediterranean Sea, but the attack on Alger was not possible to carry out during strong winds, so Commander Fredrik Chr. Kaas had to retreat home. It was the only time that the shipwreck was struggling, as "Printz Friderich" was sometimes equipped for squadron skiing in the Baltic Sea and the North Sea.

As part of a squadron, "Printz Friderich" was subjected to autumn storms on the Kattegat in September 1780, which was not very dangerous since the autumn storm in the 1700s was an important cause of shipwreck in the domestic waters. After the outbreak of the American independence war in 1775, the superpower policy in Europe had acidified so that this conflict was internationalized after France and the Netherlands joined the American rebels in 1778. Thus, a larger part of the naval fleet had to be equipped for annual tours, not least to enforce the neutrality and escort the rich loaded ostindia and China carriers home in safety.

The annual tenant cargo ship of 10 liners and 4 frigates with 3500 sailors and 1118 soldiers were sent to sea as long as the world dispute lasted. For escorts of ships that were to and from India and China, some ships were chosen too long for Kapp the good hope in South Africa. The escort service was very demanding for seamen aboard the ships and the naval fleet administration which could pay a lot of extra expenses and count on the inevitable loss of ships at sea. Often escort ships had to be at sea in the autumn with the many autumn storms when returning ships from Africa and Asia were escorted to Copenhagen.

On 28 September 1780, "Printz Friderich" was due at Kobbergrund, southeast of Læsø. Captain Andreas Lous, who had the command, was ill-reported and thus could not keep up with the night in which captain Robert Anthon de Fontenay had to take over the command.It happened at a critical time when you had to turn to the northeast so you could have the Nidingens Lighthouse in sight. In severe weather there could be strong currents in the ocean, and when the turn was to come, you would have come in too shallow waters. The noise did not brighten, so "Printz Friderich" grounded twice. It was dark so the warden officers were not able to orient themselves so when the daylight came, it was discovered that they had come out of course.

The shipwreck had stranded on top of Kobbergrund, and with offshore winds the sails could not be used, so the rowing boats were sown to pull it off. The ship was not going to swell, and when there was a strong breeze, the attempted firing test was required. Not long afterwards, "Printz Friderich" was exposed to a strong autumn storm which gradually, but surely struggled against the ground, causing major leakage damage. The crew had to spend the night on September 30 on board the ship's ship before they could be evacuated to land when the weather improved. The storm resumed, so it was impossible to save simultaneous men. 8 men died.

"Printz Friderich" on October 2, after further investigation was declared as total loss so that one had to store what could be saved.
 
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