Ratlines

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Aug 31, 2019
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Rüdesheim am Rhein, Germany
The calculation of rope strenghts for standing rigging is based on the diameter of the main mast in %. (According to the author "Mondfeld").

For example, a 74-gun ship has 80 mm main shroudes, 43 mm main-topmast shrouds, 22 mm main-topgallant shrouds. (According to the author Boudriot). The fore mast and the mizzen mast again have different shroud rope thickness (%) than the main mast.

A kit model uses the same diameter for the lower shrouds regardless of the mast. For the higher topmast shrouds thinner shrouds with the same diameter regardless of the mast. The same applies to the topgallant shrouds.

Regardless of the rope thickness of the shrouds, the step height of the ratlines is 38-40 cm, the thickness of the ratlines is 12 mm, no matter where they climb around. For example: at a scale of 1:50, the rope thickness of their ratline is 12 mm : 50 = 0,24 mm.

I hope that was not too confusing now.

With best regards
Thomas
 
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Aug 8, 2019
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The mainstay is 1/6 part of the diameter of the mainmast (thickest point near the dek)
The rest of the rigging is based on percentages of this mainstay (mainstay is 100%) so works Mondfeld.
An other model builder had make a Excell file, where you can put the diameter of the mainmast in. I worked it out and in the attachment there is a copy of it.
Only it is in Dutch. I will look to translate it in English.

Edit: English version and completed 16th to 19th century
 

Attachments

  • Rigging sizes Mondfeld.xlsx
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Joined
Aug 6, 2018
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Location
calahonda, mijas costa, malaga- spain
I hate doing ratlines!!!
Just saying!
I tink that you may try to to many at a time. Make 45 rows aday, and then do something else -kissing the wife, watch Football and the come back again and do a few more- Rome was Not bild one. P.S. I LIKE to do it, for me it is relaxing, as you concentrate all you brain- no time to think about others, when doing it.
 
Joined
Aug 6, 2018
Messages
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Location
calahonda, mijas costa, malaga- spain
I always cheat with ratlines. You can thread the line through the middle of the shrouds instead of tying all those knots.
NOT GOOD. Cheating is no good. The main problems -see it very often - is that builders do not take into account, that diameter of the ratlines are much thinner than the through
 

Canoe21

Lawrence
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Mar 31, 2017
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Location
Sutton. Ontario, Canada
I was having trouble controlling the free end of the ratline thread when tying clove hitches on the first shroud.
The Caldercraft thread is a bit springy and the first loop of the clove hitch tended to come undone.
I tried various solutions (involving paper clips etc) which failed.
I have now solved the problem by installing a dummy extra shroud at the side of the real ones.
I tie a simple, overhand knot around this to retain the end of the ratline.
I then have both hands free to tie, tension and control the first clove hitch. The later ones are no problem.
The dummy shroud is available for all the ratlines. It is the one to the left of the shrouds in the following photo.View attachment 206076
Hello

Short John Bronze, I believe that the dummy shroud is not necessary. I like to leave an inch or a bit more line outside of your knot, if your line is springy you can try to wet it a bit before tying and do tighten each knot by pulling on your rope from each end, when dry use diluted white glue to set and secure your knot. Do have a look at my scratch build the Oliver Cromwell and see how I tackle my Rat Lines. Tie a couple and then take a break before doing the next couple and you will find the Rat Lines are not all that bad.
Regards Lawrence
 
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