San Juan Nepomuceno. 74c ship of the line 1766.

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calahonda, mijas costa, malaga- spain
Sorry for the short answer, but it should now from today giving an explanation.
Furled Sails: These are sails that are in a partially lifted position
On a real ship at sea, the sail surface was reduced many times with strong winds. In Harbour many sales were furled too -letting a few set, to maintain the ship's position on the anchor.
In Ships modelling it is mainly the lower sails and sometimes the topgallant sails there are furled. In my point of view, it is mainly done, to give a better view of the deck's details etc. will attach a few images
El Capi
p.s. both images are from the book: wooden ship modelling for dummies. A preview can be seen on the Net, but if you want to see all- pay
 

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Sep 13, 2018
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Madrid (Spain)
Hi parnawac, pleased to meet you. In fact it is not my interpretation but the actual facts gathered in the monography "Navío San Juan Nepomuceno" written by Alejandro Yáñez after years of investigation and many visits to the Naval Museum.

"In 1790 she comes into El Ferrol shipyard to receive the coppering, being ready to set sail in april that year"

Greetings
Jaime
 
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Dec 19, 2020
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Hi parnawac, pleased to meet you. In fact it is not my interpretation but the actual facts gathered in the monography "Navío San Juan Nepomuceno" written by Alejandro Yáñez after years of investigation and many visits to the Naval Museum.

"In 1790 she comes into El Ferrol shipyard to receive the coppering, being ready to set sail in april that year"

Greetings
Jaime
Thanks for that info , nice to live close by the museum, very nice work.
 
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