The Elements and Practice of Rigging and Seamanship

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I was looking for information on how to rig the bowsprit for the model I am building, on the net. I came across this quite by accident. I have heard of this book, but have put off trying to find it.

Written by: David Steel in 1794.
You may think me ignorant for posting this, as you already know about it or have this in your reference library, I don't know. But here is the link for those who do not. http://maritime.org/doc/steel/index.htm
It is all there, completely laid out for the using. For me, I have found a treasure!
It does lack a lot of diagrams that would make it much easier. But it explains things in great detail.

Another link for some very useful information: http://www.hnsa.org/resources/manuals-documents/age-of-sail/textbook-of-seamanship/rigging-ship/

Most of you probably already know about these links. But, I haven't seen them or have overlooked them. I don't remember ever seeing these links before. But I am posting these for those of us who do not have them. So please, those of you who know about them, or have them, don't think I am insulting you, or that I am believing I have found the holy grail for ship building. Most of you, have been doing this a whole lot longer than me and I know that.

Dave
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Rigging changed over time and thus there are several books that cover what was proper at that time only and was used until anther one from a different period was published or was changed by an establishment. Also, it varied by the country. Some of the changes may take years for other countries to adopt the improvements. Thus, the date and country of your model must be used to determine how the rigging was probably done for that vessel.
 
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Perhaps model ship building isn't my niche. I understand that things change with time. If they didn't, we would still be using horse back mail delivery! Smoke signals, wagon trains, spears and clubs, wearing only animal skins and grunting in communication.
No tv, radio, cell phones...etc.
I should not share what I think someone might be able to use with what they are building?
My model, is far from purist, but others have gleaned information and ideas from the build.
I am not a purist when I build. I follow current principle, but not necessarily practice. Perhaps that's the other way around.
So, no one is building from that period and I posted really bad info.
I will watch myself more carefully. But, I did say, something to ADD to your library...or a reasonable fax thereof
Without sharing, this forum would be...what?
Ah well, have a good day!

Dave
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No information is information and information is always a good thing.
Also, when building a model, it is for enjoyment purposes and it is your model and your chose of how to build it. The person you are satisfying is you. Very few modelers are purist and even some of them will not or do not have the skill to build everything into a model because of the scale. The pleasure of the build and the pleasure of a completed model is the goal.
Realize that the people you will be showing your model to, including the people on any web site, this one included, usually know even less than the person building the model. So share everything. My models do not included everything I know because it requires more skill to do some of the stuff that I know. Also, I chose to not spend the extra time to do some parts that no one will probably ever notice or will ever catch that I did not do it.
Like I said, your model is your model and pleasing yourself is the most important part. This is a great hobby that I wish everyone enjoyed. What it requires is patience. This is a hobby that invites everyone to join in but today, patience is becoming rare.
Glad you are aboard.
I have been building models for almost 60 years, so my knowledge is large but the models I have built show the learning process. However, I still like the ones I built when I was a teenager and can enjoy the pictures of them. So build away and share. There is always someone out there that needs everything you share.
 

Donnie

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Gary,
thank you for posting this link. I have bookmarked it for later observations and reading when I have time.

Donnie
 
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Thanks for the links Dave, I have had a quick dip and they are good for my simple understanding. I'm rigging my build as per the plans and if the kit manufacturer has got it slightly wrong on a couple of points I take comfort from my visit to HMS Victory earlier this year - a guide told me that they research extensively (probably more than any of us) and even now they find reference to the odd rope/pulley/shackle which they then add. Regards.
 
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Yes. Steel's book gives some good illustrations that help you understand just how things were done in that time period when Nelson was in command for his final battle. Longridge's book would be helpful also but has limited pictures.
 
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Patience is not an issue, at least not in my world. I guess what I was saying poorly was...i am a freelance model builder. In my model railroading, I chose narrow gauge. The only thing in this that is prototype, is motive power and rail gauge. Everything else is designed, laid out and scratch built from there, by me. Prototype for me, is very distracting. I dont follow a prototype railroad. Fictional towns, areas, names, etc...
I cant bring myself to purchase a model of high expense, then waste it.
The model I am building right now, has thus far, lent itself very nicely to the changes I have made. It was also, a 75.00 model.
Turning this little schooner into a brigantine, has so far, been great fun. But, it is not wasting an expensive model.
A whole lot of freelancing going on.
Building it as the kit, I was becoming very tired of it. It wasn't just the damage it had endured in the fall.
It sat for months untouched. It's just me!

Dave
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There are some really nice models out there that people have done just what you have done Dave. For example, Popeye took a kit and has modified it to make three different vessels. Many people come up with some great ideas to use parts of a kit as a basis for building the ship they want. I just read about a solid hull kit that someone only used the solid hull, some of the fittings and wood to create the ship he wanted. The limiting factor is only your imagination. These are the things that make this a great hobby. Building what you like and enjoying the process is what is important.
 
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