17th Century Dutch Galliot [COMPLETED BUILD]

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Mar 9, 2020
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Washington Crossing, PA
Part 7 Masting and Rigging

Masting on this model was simple consisting of a main and mizzen lower masts terminating in poles. The poles are rather small in diameter, 1/16” and 3/32”, and would have been relatively weak if made from wood. So rather than turning the ends of the mast dowels to the pole size, holes were drilled in the ends for later insertion of brass rods before starting to the taper the masts. The below photo shows the model with masts in place.
fig 35 mastingIMG_1877.jpg

The yards consisted of a gaff on the main mast and a boom on the mizzen.

I prefer not to install sails or any of the rigging that is associated with sail handling on my models. So the rigging plan was simplified to only the standing rigging for the masts and running rigging for the yards. Curiously, the plans showed no rigging to control the mizzen boom. I added a lift, bowlines and vangs as would be typical for a yard of this type. Even if these lines were not needed on the real ship, I needed them to keep the yard in place on the model. Also the plans did not show any belaying points. So I had to ask myself how a Dutch sea captain in 1670 would prefer to have his ship rigged. The answer is that I don't have the foggiest idea. I added a number of cleats to the rails and deck in positions I thought were reasonable to accept the ends of the lines and also installed a pin rail between the masts. These can be seen in the above photo.

The next three figures show the completed rigging on the main mast, a detail of the traveller, formed from copper wire, on the bowsprit, and a closeup of the main mast rigging with the pole inserted in the mast.
fig 36 main mast rigIMG_1879.jpgfig 37 traveller IMG_1881.jpgfig 38 main mast detailIMG_1887.jpg

Mizzen mast and boom rigging is illustrated below:
fig 39 mizzen detailIMG_1888.jpg

The model with rigging completed and a view of the deck to indicate the belaying scheme are shown in the final two photos. Now the only work left is to build and install the anchors and mount the model on a base.
Fig 40completed riggingMG_1892.jpgfig 41 belayingIMG_1885.jpg
 
Joined
Mar 9, 2020
Messages
136
Points
113

Location
Washington Crossing, PA
Part 7 Masting and Rigging

Masting on this model was simple consisting of a main and mizzen lower masts terminating in poles. The poles are rather small in diameter, 1/16” and 3/32”, and would have been relatively weak if made from wood. So rather than turning the ends of the mast dowels to the pole size, holes were drilled in the ends for later insertion of brass rods before starting to the taper the masts. The below photo shows the model with masts in place.
fig 35 mastingIMG_1877.jpg

The yards consisted of a gaff on the main mast and a boom on the mizzen.

I prefer not to install sails or any of the rigging that is associated with sail handling on my models. So the rigging plan was simplified to only the standing rigging for the masts and running rigging for the yards. Curiously, the plans showed no rigging to control the mizzen boom. I added a lift, bowlines and vangs as would be typical for a yard of this type. Even if these lines were not needed on the real ship, I needed them to keep the yard in place on the model. Also the plans did not show any belaying points. So I had to ask myself how a Dutch sea captain in 1670 would prefer to have his ship rigged. The answer is that I don't have the foggiest idea. I added a number of cleats to the rails and deck in positions I thought were reasonable to accept the ends of the lines and also installed a pin rail between the masts. These can be seen in the above photo.

The next three figures show the completed rigging on the main mast, a detail of the traveller, formed from copper wire, on the bowsprit, and a closeup of the main mast rigging with the pole inserted in the mast.
fig 36 main mast rigIMG_1879.jpg
fig 37 traveller IMG_1881.jpgfig 38 main mast detailIMG_1887.jpg


Mizzen mast and boom rigging is illustrated below:

fig 39 mizzen detailIMG_1888.jpg

Part 8 Ready for Sea

Anchor dimensions for the model were not shown in the plans so had to be determined from other depictions of galliots. Thickness of the shank was estimated to be 3/32”. I glued 1/32” plywood to 1/16” plywood to get starting material of the right size, pasted on paper patterns for the anchor shape, and cut out anchor blanks minus the palms. I have found plywood to be essential for making a one piece wooden anchors to avoid breakage. The blank was then sanded to the correct shape and dimensions, and palms, cut from 1/32” plywood were attached. The completed anchor was painted with pearl noir paint to give it a metallic iron appearance. The stock was shaped from 3/16” cherry. The anchors and ground tackle installed on the model are shown below:
fig 42 anchorsIMG_1894.jpg

The remaining work to get to the finish line was to build a base and mount the model its cradle. And here are the final results:
fig 43 model1IMG_1897.jpgfig 44 modle2IMG_1902.jpgfig 46 model4IMG_1903.jpgfig 45 model3IMG_1904.jpg


This project met all of the expectations I started with. Work was not tedious (primarily in view of the simple rigging) and went fairly quickly (5 months from start to end); the small size (15 “ overall length) made it easy to find a home; and for a small boat there were enough challenges to provide a lot of interest while building. Also I was more pleased with the eye appeal than I anticipated from the plans. All in all a very satisfying modeling experience.
 

Uwek

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Congratulations for this very fine model Thumbsup Thumbsup Thumbsup

and? as usual at this point, I am interested to know what is your next project, also hoping to see it in a new building log..... would be great
 
Joined
Mar 9, 2020
Messages
136
Points
113

Location
Washington Crossing, PA
Congratulations for this very fine model Thumbsup Thumbsup Thumbsup

and? as usual at this point, I am interested to know what is your next project, also hoping to see it in a new building log..... would be great
I haven't decided yet what to tackle next, but it will be something small once again. I'll be searching through available plans and looking at the models on this site to get some ideas and hopefully something will catch my eye. Thanks for your encouragement during the writing of this log.
 

Uwek

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I haven't decided yet what to tackle next, but it will be something small once again. I'll be searching through available plans and looking at the models on this site to get some ideas and hopefully something will catch my eye. Thanks for your encouragement during the writing of this log.
maybe taking a look at the available planset and monographies from ancre - look around here, you will find several interesting smaller ships also:
 
Joined
Feb 28, 2021
Messages
7
Points
43

Location
roden The Netherland
Hi Polydoc,
I have the same book and I build de Heringbus .The way You build is ferry nice and beautiful.
I olso build the Catschip but I don't like the result so muche.
Now I'm bussy with the pinas and that is a great ship
But I like your work and love your story
Greetings Cees
 
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