28th of March - Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History

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Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History
23rd of March

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1745 – Launch of HMS Gloucester, a 50-gun fourth rate ship of the line built for the Royal Navy in the 1740s
HMS Gloucester
was a 50-gun fourth rate ship of the line built for the Royal Navy in the 1740s. She participated in the 1740–48 War of the Austrian Succession, capturing four French privateers. The ship was broken up in 1764.
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1762 – Launch of HMS Kent, a 74-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, at Deptford Dockyard.
HMS Kent
was a 74-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 23 March 1762 at Deptford Dockyard.
In 1774, a chest containing perhaps as much as 400 lb (181.4 kg) of gunpowder exploded during saluting, killing eleven and injuring dozens more, and causing the marine drummer sitting on the chest to be blown overboard. The marine reportedly suffered no injuries as a result.
She was sold out of the service in 1784.
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ventilator (ZAZ6814) of 'Defence' (sistership)

1780 – Launch of HMS Fortitude, a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built by John Randall & Co., at Rotherhithe.
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1794 – Launch of French HMS Donegal, launched as Barra, a Téméraire class 74-gun ship of the line of the French Navy.
She was renamed Pégase in October 1795, and Hoche in December 1797. The British Royal Navy captured her on 12 October 1798 and recommissioned her as HMS Donegal.
HMS Donegal
was launched in 1794 as Barra, a Téméraire class 74-gun ship of the line of the French Navy. She was renamed Pégase in October 1795, and Hoche in December 1797. The British Royal Navy captured her on 12 October 1798 and recommissioned her as HMS Donegal.
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'Duckworth's Action off San Domingo, 6 February 1806' by Nicholas Pocock. HMS Donegal is on the left of the painting, engaging the Jupiter
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HMS Donegal (PAH0760)

1796 – Launch of French Loire, a 44-gun frigate of the French Navy.
Loire was a 44-gun frigate of the French Navy. She was captured following the Battle of Tory Island by a Royal Navy frigate squadron and subsequently taken into British service as HMS Loire.
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Capture of Loire

1815 - USS Hornet captures HMS Penguin
HMS Penguin
was a Royal Navy Cruizer-class brig-sloop launched in 1813. In 1815 USS Hornet captured Penguin in a battle that took place after the end of the War of 1812. Hornet then scuttled Penguin as she was too damaged to merit keeping.
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The action between USS Hornet and HMS Penguin

1848 – The ship John Wickliffe arrives at Port Chalmers carrying the first Scottish settlers for Dunedin, New Zealand. Otago province is founded.
John Wickliffe was the first ship to arrive carrying Scottish settlers, including Otago settlement founder Captain William Cargill, in the city of Dunedin, New Zealand. The ship was named after a reformer, John Wycliffe.
Departing with 97 passengers from Gravesend, near London, on 22 November 1847, and from Portsmouth on 14 December 1847, she arrived at Port Chalmers on 23 March 1848. 23 March is now observed as Otago Anniversary Day, although the anniversary actually celebrates the establishment of the Otago provincial government on the same day in 1852. Her sister ship, Philip Laing, arrived three weeks later on 15 April.
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Complete passenger list of the John Wickcliffe

1853 – Launch of HMS St Jean d'Acre, the Royal Navy's first 101 gun screw two-decker line-of-battle ship.
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HMS St Jean d'Acre

1902 – Launch of Adolphe, a sailing ship that was wrecked at the mouth of the Hunter River in New South Wales, Australia, in 1904
The Adolphe was a sailing ship that was wrecked at the mouth of the Hunter River in New South Wales, Australia, in 1904. The ship is now the most prominent of several wrecks on what is now the Stockton breakwall, which protects Newcastle harbour. The rescue of the ship’s crew has gone down in local maritime history as one of the most remarkable in local waters.
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The wreck of the Adolphe on Stockton breakwall

1906 – Launch of SMS Scharnhorst ("His Majesty's Ship Scharnhorst"), an armored cruiser of the Imperial German Navy, built at the Blohm & Voss shipyard in Hamburg, Germany.
SMS Scharnhorst
("His Majesty's Ship Scharnhorst")[a] was an armored cruiser of the Imperial German Navy, built at the Blohm & Voss shipyard in Hamburg, Germany. She was the lead ship of her class, which included SMS Gneisenau. Scharnhorst and her sister were enlarged versions of the preceding Roon class; they were equipped with a greater number of main guns and were capable of a higher top speed. The ship was named after the Prussian military reformer General Gerhard von Scharnhorst and commissioned into service on 24 October 1907.
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1911 - The passenger ship SS Yongala sank off Cape Bowling Green, Queensland, Australia - All 122 aboard were lost,
The passenger ship SS Yongala sank off Cape Bowling Green, Queensland, Australia on 23 March 1911. En route from Melbourneto Cairns she steamed into a cyclone and sank south of Townsville. All 122 aboard were lost, and traces of the ship were not found until days later, when cargo and wreckage began to wash ashore at Cape Bowling Green and at Cleveland Bay. It was believed that the hull of the ship had been ripped open by a submerged rock. The wreck, which has become a tourist attraction and dive site, was not found until 1958.
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Postcard of SS Yongala from c. 1905

1921 – Launch of STS Sedov (Russian: Седов), formerly Magdalene Vinnen II (1921–1936) and Kommodore Johnsen (–1948), a four-masted steel barque that for almost 80 years was the largest traditional sailing ship in operation.
STS Sedov
(Russian: Седов), formerly Magdalene Vinnen II (1921–1936) and Kommodore Johnsen (–1948), is a four-masted steel barque that for almost 80 years was the largest traditional sailing ship in operation. Originally built as a German cargo ship, Sedov is today a sail training vessel, training cadets from the universities of Murmansk, Saint Petersburg and Arkhangelsk. She participates regularly in the big maritime international events as a privileged host and has also been a regular participant in The Tall Ships' Races.
Sedov_(ship,_1921),_Sète,_Hérault_07.jpg
 

Uwek

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Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History
24th of March

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1607 – Birth of Michiel de Ruyter, Dutch admiral (d. 1667)
Michiel Adriaenszoon de Ruyter
(24 March 1607 – 29 April 1676) was a Dutch admiral. He was one of the most skilled admirals in history, most famous for his role in the Anglo-Dutch Wars of the 17th century. He fought the English and French and scored several major victories against them, the best known probably being the Raid on the Medway. The pious De Ruyter was very much loved by his sailors and soldiers; from them his most significant nickname derived: Bestevaêr (older Dutch for 'grandfather'.)
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1693 - Birth - and
24 March 1776 - Death of John Harrison, English clockmaker, invented the Marine chronometer
John Harrison
(3 April [O.S. 24 March] 1693 – 24 March 1776) was a self-educated English carpenter and clockmaker who invented the marine chronometer, a long-sought-after device for solving the problem of calculating longitude while at sea.
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Grasshopper escapement

1796 – Launch of HMS York, a 64-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy
HMS York
was a 64-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 24 March 1796. She served briefly in the West Indies where she captured numerous small vessels. She was wrecked in 1804.
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Scale: 1:48. Plan showing the body plan, inboard profile with one waterline, and basic longitudinal half-breadth for converting York (purchased 1795), an East India Company ship, to a 64-gun Third Rate, two-decker. The plan still refers to the ship under her East India Company name of Royal Admiral. The body plan and half-breadth are in faint pencil.

1800 - Launch of French Navy's Téméraire-class ship of the line Duguay-Trouin, the later HMS Implacable, a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy.
HMS Implacable
was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy. She was originally the French Navy's Téméraire-class ship of the line Duguay-Trouin, launched in 1800.
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The Russian ship Vsevolod burning, after the action with the Implacable and Centaur, destroyed in the presence of the Russian Fleet near Rogerwick bay on 26 August 1808.


1806 - HMS Reindeer (18), John Fyffe, engaged Voltigeur (16), Jacques Saint-Cricq, and Phaeton (16), Louis-Henri Freycinet-Saulce.
On 24 March 1806, off Puerto Rico, Reindeer encountered two French brigs, Phaéton and Voltigeur, each of sixteen 6-pounder guns. The vessels exchanged fire for some four hours. Reindeer succeeded in damaging the French brigs before they escaped; Reindeer too had some damage but no casualties. Two days later Pique captured the two French brigs. Phaéton, under the command of Lieutenant de vaisseau Saulces de Freycinet, was sailing to the Antilles when she was captured near Santo Domingo. The Admiralty took Phaeton into British service as Mignonne and Voltigeur as Pelican.
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U.S. Marines aboard USS Wasp engage the HMS Reindeer from the 1945 painting by American artist, Staff Sgt. John F. Clymer, on display at the U.S. National Museum of the Marine Corps

1860 – Launch of HMS Frederick William, an 86-gun screw-propelled first-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy.
HMS Frederick William
was an 86-gun screw-propelled first-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy.
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Scale: 1:48. Plan showing the framing profile (disposition) for Queen (1839), a 110-gun First Rate, three-decker. The plan Algiers (cancelled 1840), and initially for the original designs of Windsor Castle (1858) when first ordered as Victoria, and Frederick William (1860), when first ordered as Royal Frederick (previously named Royal Sovereign until April 1839).

1878 –The British frigate HMS Eurydice sinks, killing more than 300.
HMS Eurydice – On 24 March 1878, the training ship Eurydice was caught in a heavy snow storm off the Isle of Wight, capsized, and sank. Two of the ship's 378 crew and trainees survived; most of those who were not carried down with the ship died of exposure in the freezing waters.
HMS
Eurydice was a 26-gun Royal Navy corvette which was the victim of one of Britain's worst peacetime naval disasters when she sank in 1878.
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1898 - Launch of USS Kearsarge (BB-5), the lead ship of her class of pre-dreadnought battleships, and also of her sistership USS Kentucky (BB 6)
USS Kearsarge (BB-5)
, the lead ship of her class of pre-dreadnought battleships, was a United States Navy ship, named after the sloop-of-war Kearsarge. Her keel was laid down by the Newport News Shipbuilding Company of Virginia, on 30 June 1896. She was launched on 24 March 1898, sponsored by Mrs. Elizabeth Winslow (née Maynard), the wife of Rear Admiral Herbert Winslow, and commissioned on 20 February 1900.
Between 1903 and 1907 Kearsarge served in the North Atlantic Fleet, and from 1907 to 1909 she sailed as part of the Great White Fleet. In 1909 she was decommissioned for modernization, which was finished in 1911. In 1915 she served in the Atlantic, and between 1916 and 1919 she served as a training ship. She was converted into a crane ship in 1920, renamed Crane Ship No. 1 in 1941, and sold for scrap in 1955. She was the only United States Navy battleship to not be named after a state.
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1916 - the French passenger ferry Sussex was sailing from Folkestone to Dieppe when she was torpedoed by SM UB-29.
She was severely damaged with her entire bow forward of her bridge blown off. Some of her lifeboats were launched, but at least two capsized and many passengers were drowned. Of 53 crew and 325 passengers at least 50 were killed, but a figure of between 80 and 100 is also suggested. Sussex remained afloat and was eventually towed stern-first into Boulogne harbour.

Sussex was a cross-English Channel passenger ferry, built in 1896 for the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway (LBSCR). After the LBSCR came to a co-operation agreement with the Compagnie des Chemins de Fer de l'État Français, she transferred to their fleet under a French flag. Sussex became the focus of an international incident when she was severely damaged by a torpedo from a German U-Boat in 1916. After the war she was repaired and sold to Greece in 1919, being renamed Aghia Sophia. Following a fire in 1921, the ship was scrapped.
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Sussex at Boulogne after being torpedoed in March 1916. The entire forepart of the ship was destroyed in the attack.

1925 – Launch of SS Admiral Nakhimov (Russian: Адмирал Нахимов), originally named SS Berlin, a passenger liner of the German Weimar Republic later converted to a hospital ship, then a Soviet passenger ship.
SS Admiral Nakhimov
(Russian: Адмирал Нахимов), launched in March 1925 and originally named SS Berlin, was a passenger liner of the German Weimar Republic later converted to a hospital ship, then a Soviet passenger ship. On 31 August 1986, Admiral Nakhimov collided with the large bulk carrier Pyotr Vasev in the Tsemes Bay, near the port of Novorossiysk, Russian SFSR, and quickly sank. In total, 423 of the 1,234 people on board died.
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1989 - Alaska, Prince William Sound: 210,000 ton oil tanker "Exxon Valdez" ran onto a reef
The Exxon Valdez oil spill occurred in Prince William Sound, Alaska, March 24, 1989, when Exxon Valdez, an oil tanker owned by Exxon Shipping Company, bound for Long Beach, California, struck Prince William Sound's Bligh Reef, 1.5 mi (2.4 km) west of Tatitlek, Alaska, at 12:04 am. local time and spilled 10.8 million US gallons (260,000 bbl) (or 37,000 metric tonnes) of crude oil over the next few days. It is considered to be one of the most devastating human-caused environmental disasters. The Valdez spill is the second largest in US waters, after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, in terms of volume released. Prince William Sound's remote location, accessible only by helicopter, plane, or boat, made government and industry response efforts difficult and severely taxed existing response plans. The region is a habitat for salmon, sea otters, seals and seabirds. The oil, originally extracted at the Prudhoe Bay Oil Field, eventually impacted 1,300 miles (2,100 km) of coastline, of which 200 miles (320 km) were heavily or moderately oiled with an obvious impact.
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Three days after Exxon Valdez ran aground

 

Uwek

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1708 - Launch of HMS Ruby, a 50-gun fourth rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built by Sir Joseph Allin at Deptford Dockyard to the 1706 Establishment,
HMS Ruby
was a 50-gun fourth rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built by Sir Joseph Allin at Deptford Dockyard to the 1706 Establishment, and launched on 25 March 1708.
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1708 - Launch of HMS Resolution, a 70-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built by Sir Joseph Allin according to the 1706 Establishment at Deptford Dockyard,
HMS Resolution
was a 70-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built by Sir Joseph Allin according to the 1706 Establishment at Deptford Dockyard, and launched on 25 March 1708. Resolution was wrecked in 1711.
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1745 – Birth of John Barry (naval officer), American naval officer and father of the American navy (d. 1803)
John Barry
(March 25, 1745 – September 13, 1803) was an officer in the Continental Navy during the American Revolutionary Warand later in the United States Navy. He came to be widely credited as "The Father of the American Navy" (and shares that moniker with John Paul Jones and John Adams) and was appointed a captain in the Continental Navy on December 7, 1775. He was the first captain placed in command of a U.S. warship commissioned for service under the Continental flag.
After the war, he became the first commissioned U.S. naval officer, at the rank of commodore, receiving his commission from President George Washington in 1797.
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1795 - HMS Speedy was a 14-gun Speedy-class brig of the British Royal Navy, recaptured from the French
HMS Speedy
was a 14-gun Speedy-class brig of the British Royal Navy. Built during the last years of the American War of Independence, she served with distinction during the French Revolutionary Wars.
Built at Dover, Kent, Speedy spent most of the interwar years serving off the British coast. Transferred to the Mediterranean after the outbreak of the French Revolutionary Wars, she spent the rest of her career there under a number of notable commanders, winning fame for herself in various engagements and often against heavy odds. Her first commander in the Mediterranean, Charles Cunningham, served with distinction with several squadrons, assisting in the capture of several war prizes, such as the French frigates Modeste and Impérieuse. His successor, George Cockburn, impressed his superiors with his dogged devotion to duty. Speedy's next commander, George Eyre, had the misfortune to lose her to a superior French force on 9 June 1794.
She was soon retaken, and re-entered service under Hugh Downman, who captured a number of privateers between 1795 and 1799 and fought off an attack by the large French privateer Papillon on 3 February 1798. His successor, Jahleel Brenton, fought a number of actions against Spanish forces off Gibraltar. Her last captain, Lord Cochrane, forced the surrender of a much larger Spanish warship, the Gamo. Speedy was finally captured by a powerful French squadron in 1801 and donated to the Papal Navy by Napoleon the following year. She spent five years with them under the name San Paolo, but was struck around 1806.
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1804 - HMS Magnificent (74), Cptn. W. H. Jervis, wrecked near the Pierres Noires, Brest.
HMS Magnificent
was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 20 September 1766 at Deptford Dockyard. She was one of the Ramillies-class built to update the Navy and replace ships lost following the Seven Years' War. She served through two wars before her loss during blockade duty off the French coast.
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1872 – Launch of HMS Thunderer, one of two Devastation-class ironclad turret ships
HMS Thunderer
was one of two Devastation-class ironclad turret ships built for the Royal Navy in the 1870s. She suffered two serious accidents before the decade was out and gained a reputation as an unlucky ship for several years afterward. The ship was assigned to the Mediterranean Fleet in 1878 and was reduced to reserve in 1881 before being recommissioned in 1885. Thunderer returned home in 1887 and was again placed in reserve. She rejoined the Mediterranean Fleet in 1891, but was forced to return to the UK by boiler problems the following year. The ship became a coast guard ship in Wales in 1895 and was again placed in reserve in 1900. Thunderer was taken out of service in 1907 and sold for scrap in 1909.
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1778 – Launch of French Surveillante, an Iphigénie-class 32-gun frigate of the French Navy
Surveillante was an Iphigénie-class 32-gun frigate of the French Navy. She took part in the Naval operations in the American Revolutionary War, where she became famous for her battle with HMS Quebec; in 1783, she brought the news that the war was over to America. She later took part in the French Revolutionary Wars, and was eventually scuttled during the Expédition d'Irlande after sustaining severe damage in a storm. The wreck was found in 1979 and is now a memorial.
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Battle between the French frigate Surveillante and the British frigate Quebec, 6 October 1779. Auguste-Louis Rossel de Cercy

1796 – Launch of HMS Clyde and HMS Tamar, both Royal Navy Artois-class frigates, built at Chatham Dockyard of fir (pitch pine)
HMS Clyde
was a Royal Navy Artois-class frigate built at Chatham Dockyard of fir (pitch pine), and launched in 1796. In 1797, she was one of only two ships whose captains were able to maintain some control over their vessels during the Nore mutiny. In 1805, HMS Clyde was dismantled and rebuilt at Woolwich Dockyard; she was relaunched on 23 February 1806. She was ultimately sold in August 1814.
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HMS 'Clyde' Arriving at Sheerness After the 'Nore' Mutiny, 30 May 1797

1800 - Launch of HMS Courageux, a 74-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, at Deptford.
HMS Courageux
was a 74-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 26 March 1800 at Deptford. She was designed by Sir John Henslow as one of the large class 74-gun ships, and was the only ship built to her draught. Unlike the middling and common class 74-gun ships, which carried 18-pounder long guns, as a large 74-gun ship, Courageux carried 24-pounders on her upper gun deck.
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1806 - HMS Pique (40), Charles Bayne Hodgson Ross, captured Voltigeur (16), Jacques Saint-Cricq, and Phaeton (16), Louis-Henri Freycinet-Saulce, in the West Indies
The French brig Voltigeur was a Palinure-class brig launched in 1804. The British captured her in 1806 and renamed her HMS Pelican. She was sold in 1812.
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1808 - french brig Friedland, the name-ship of her class of French Illyrien or Friedland-class, was captured by 64-gun third rate HMS Standard and the 38-gun frigate HMS Active
Friedland was the name-ship of her class of French Illyrien or Friedland-class brig. She was built at Venice and launched in June 1807. The Royal Navy captured her a year later and took her into service as HMS Delight. She served in the Mediterranean and was sold in 1814.
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Scale: 1:48. Plan showing the body plan with stern board detail, sheer lines with inboard detail, and longitudinal half-breadth for 'Standard' (1782), a 64-gun Third Rate, two-decker, as built at Deptford Dockyard. Signed by Adam Hayes [Master Shipwright, Deptford Dockyard, 1755-1785 (died)].

1811 – Launch of HMS Havannah, a Royal Navy 36-gun fifth-rate frigate.
HMS Havannah
was a Royal Navy 36-gun fifth-rate frigate. She was launched in 1811 and was one of twenty-seven Apollo-class frigates. She was cut down to a 24-gun sixth rate in 1845, converted to a training ship in 1860, and sold for breaking up in 1905.
sistership Euralus
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1814 - Battle of Jobourg
HMS Hebrus (36), Cptn. Edmund Palmer, took French Etoile (44), Cptn. Henri Pierre Philibert, and HMS Hannibal (74), Cptn. Sir Michael Seymour, took Sultane (40) in the Channel.

The Battle of Jobourg was a minor naval engagement between British and French frigate squadrons during the last weeks of the War of the Sixth Coalition in the 22nd and penultimate year of the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. In October 1813 the French Navy, unable to challenge the Royal Navy's dominance at sea, sent two small squadrons of frigates to harass British trade in the Atlantic Ocean. One was brought to battle in January 1814 and defeated near the Canary Islands but the second, from Nantes and consisting of the frigates Etoile and Sultane, fought an inconclusive engagement against British frigate HMS Severn on 4 January in the mid-Atlantic and a furious battle against HMS Astrea and HMS Creole on 23 January near Maio in the Cape Verde Islands.
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1822 – Launch of HMS Rattlesnake, an Atholl-class 28-gun sixth-rate corvette of the Royal Navy
HMS Rattlesnake
was an Atholl-class 28-gun sixth-rate corvette of the Royal Navy launched in 1822. She made a historic voyage of discovery to the Cape York and Torres Strait areas of northern Australia.
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Rattlesnake, painted by Sir Oswald Walters Brierly, 1853

1834 – Launch of French Belle-Poule, a Surveillante-class 60-gun first rank frigate of the French Navy.
She achieved fame for bringing the remains of Napoleon from Saint Helena back to France, in what became known as the Retour des cendres.

Belle-Poule was a Surveillante-class 60-gun first rank frigate of the French Navy. She achieved fame for bringing the remains of Napoleon from Saint Helena back to France, in what became known as the Retour des cendres.
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Model of Belle-Poule, on display at Toulon naval museum.

1941 - The Raid on Souda Bay was an assault by Italian Royal Navy small craft on Souda Bay, Crete
The Royal Navy heavy cruiser HMS York and the Norwegian tanker Pericles were disabled by the Italian motor launches and eventually lost.

The Raid on Souda Bay was an assault by Italian Royal Navy small craft on Souda Bay, Crete, during the first hours of 26 March 1941. The Royal Navy heavy cruiser HMS York and the Norwegian tanker Pericles were disabled by the Italian motor launches and eventually lost.
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HMS York's hull boarded by the Italian Torpedo Boat Sirio
 

Uwek

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1666 – Launch of HMS Defiance, a 64-gun third rate ship of the line of the English Royal Navy,
HMS Defiance
was a 64-gun third rate ship of the line of the English Royal Navy, ordered on 26 October 1664 under the new construction programme of that year, and launched on 27 March 1666 at William Castle's private shipyard at Deptford in the presence of King Charles II.
She was commissioned under Sir Robert Holmes and took part in the Four Days Battle on 1 June 1666—4 June 1666. Following the battle, Holmes was briefly replaced by Captain William Flawes, but a month later command was taken by Rear-Admiral Sir John Kempthorne. In September 1667 Holmes, now Commander-in-Chief at Portsmouth, was back in command, but later that year he gave way to Sir John Harman in the same role. Defiance was accidentally destroyed by fire at Chatham on 6 December 1668.
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1762 – Launch of HMS Pearl, a 32-gun fifth-rate frigate of the Niger-class in the Royal Navy, at Chatham Dockyard
HMS Pearl
was a 32-gun fifth-rate frigate of the Niger-class in the Royal Navy. Launched at Chatham Dockyard in 1762, she served in British North America until January 1773, when she sailed to England for repairs. Returning to North America in March 1776, to fight in the American Revolutionary War, Pearl escorted the transports which landed troops in Kip's Bay that September. Towards the end of 1777, she joined Richard Howe's fleet in Narragansett Bay and was still there when the French fleet arrived and began an attack on British positions. Both fleets were forced to retire due to bad weather and the action was inconclusive. Pearl was then dispatched to keep an eye on the French fleet, which had been driven into Boston.
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HMS Pearl battles the Santa Monica off the Azores in 1779

1804 – Launch of French brig Néarque, an Abeille-class brig launched at Lorient
The French brig Néarque was an Abeille-class brig launched at Lorient in 1804. She made a voyage to the Caribbean in 1805. After the frigate HMS Niobe captured her in March 1806, the Royal Navy took her into Plymouth, but apparently laid her up in ordinary. She then disappears from the records until her sale in 1814.
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1811 - Battle of Anholt
HMS Tartar (32), Cptn. Jos. Baker, and HMS Sheldrake (16), James Pattison Stewart, engage Danish Flotilla of 12 gunboats, 12 transport vessels etc., under Lt. Jørgen C. de Falsen off the Danish island of Anholt and captures 2 gunboats and 2 other ships.

The Battle of Anholt (25–27 March 1811) occurred during the Gunboat War, a war between the United Kingdom and Denmark-Norway. It was an attempt by the Danes to recapture Anholt, a small Danish island off the coast of Jutland, which the British had captured in 1809. The Danish army had a larger fighting force than the British, but a lack of planning and supply failures led to a devastating defeat and many Danish casualties. After the battle, the British occupation of Anholt continued until the peace treaty in 1814. There is a monument commemorating the battle in Anholt village.
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Tartar fighting gunboats at the battle of Alvøen

1814 – HMS Hebrus captures French frigate Étoile
Étoile was a 44-gun frigate of the French Navy, launched in 1813. The British captured her in 1814 and the Royal Navy took her into service as HMS Topaze. She did not go to sea again until 1818, and was paid off in 1822. She served as a receiving ship until 1850 and was broken up in 1851.
Etoile.jpg

Capture of Étoile by HMS Hebrus

1861 – Launch of HMS Defiance, the last wooden line-of-battle ship launched for the Royal Navy.
HMS Defiance
was the last wooden line-of-battle ship launched for the Royal Navy. She never saw service as a wooden line-of-battle ship. In 1884 she became a schoolship.
HMS_Atlas_hulk.jpg


1865 – Launch of HMS Agincourt, a Minotaur-class armoured frigate built for the Royal Navy during the 1860s.
HMS Agincourt
was a Minotaur-class armoured frigate built for the Royal Navy during the 1860s. She spent most of her career as the flagship of the Channel Squadron's second-in-command. During the Russo-Turkish War of 1877–78, she was one of the ironclads sent to Constantinople to forestall a Russian occupation of the Ottoman capital. Agincourt participated in Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee Fleet Review in 1887. The ship was placed in reserve two years later and served as a training ship from 1893 to 1909. That year she was converted into a coal hulk and renamed as C.109. Agincourt served at Sheerness until sold for scrap in 1960.
HMS_Agincourt.jpg


1880 – Launch of The French ironclad Bayard, an early stationary battleship of the French Navy, lead ship of her class.
The French ironclad Bayard was an early stationary battleship of the French Navy, lead ship of her class. Bayard had a wooden hull and a full rigging, as well as a side armour and steam machinery.
Bayard_Port_Said_2.jpg


1941 - The Battle of Cape Matapan was a Second World War naval engagement between British Imperial and Axis forces, fought from 27–29 March 1941.
The Battle of Cape Matapan was a Second World War naval engagement between British Imperial and Axis forces, fought from 27–29 March 1941. The cape is on the south-west coast of the Peloponnesian peninsula of Greece. Following the interception of Italian signals by the Government Code and Cypher School (GC&CS) at Bletchley Park, ships of the Royal Navy and Royal Australian Navy, under the command of the Royal Navy's Admiral Sir Andrew Cunningham, intercepted and sank or severely damaged several ships of the Italian Regia Marina under Squadron-Vice-Admiral Angelo Iachino. The opening actions of the battle are also known in Italy as the Battle of Gaudo.
Www2mR130BMatapan.GIF


1943 - HMS Dasher (D37), a British Royal Navy aircraft carrier, of the Avenger class – converted merchant vessels –
and one of the shortest lived escort carriers, sunk by internal explosion
HMS Dasher (D37)
was a British Royal Navy aircraft carrier, of the Avenger class – converted merchant vessels – and one of the shortest lived escort carriers.
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Today in Naval History - Naval / Maritime Events in History
28th of March

please use the following link and you will find the details and all events of this day .....


1599 – Birth of Witte Corneliszoon de With (28 March 1599 – 8 November 1658), a famous Dutch naval officer of the 17th century
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1693 – Launch of HMS Portland, a 50-gun fourth rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, at Woolwich Dockyard
She was rebuilt according to the 1719 Establishment at Portsmouth, and was relaunched on 25 February 1723.
She was present at Wager's Action a naval confrontation on 8 June 1708 N.S (28 May O.S.), between a British squadron under Charles Wager and the Spanish treasure fleet, as part of the War of Spanish Succession.
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Wager's Action off Cartagena, 28 May 1708

1693 – Launch of HMS Norfolk, an 80-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, at Southampton
HMS Norfolk
was an 80-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy. She was built at Southampton and launched on 28 March 1693, and was the first ship to bear the name. She was rebuilt at Plymouth according to the 1719 Establishment, and was re-launched on 21 September 1728. Instead of carrying her armament on two decks as she had done originally, she now carried them on three gundecks, though she continued to be rated a third rate.
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1777 – The Battle off Yarmouth took place on 28 March 1777 during the American Revolutionary War off the coast of Yarmouth, Nova Scotia.
The Battle off Yarmouth took place on 28 March 1777 during the American Revolutionary War off the coast of Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. The battle is the first American armed vessel to engage the British Navy. The British vessel HMS Milford forced the American USS Cabot aground and the American crew escaped among the inhabitants of Yarmouth.

1785 – Launch of HMS Terrible, a 74-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, at Rotherhithe.
In December 1813 she was paid off and placed in ordinary at Sheerness Dockyard. She remained out of service until 1829, other than a nine-month period between August 1822 and May 1823 when she acted as a receiving ship for volunteers and pressed men. From 1829 to 1836 she served as a coal depot for Navy steamships. Declared surplus even to this limited requirement, she was brought to Deptford Dockyard and broken up in March 1836.
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1806 - HMS Niobe (38), Cptn. J. W. Loring, captured French corvette Nearque (16) off L'Orient
The French brig Néarque was an Abeille-class brig launched at Lorient in 1804. She made a voyage to the Caribbean in 1805. After the frigate HMS Niobe captured her in March 1806, the Royal Navy took her into Plymouth, but apparently laid her up in ordinary. She then disappears from the records until her sale in 1814.
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From ancre is a beautiful monographie of the Cygne 1804 Jean BOUDRIOT & Hubert BERTI available

1814 – War of 1812: In the Battle of Valparaíso, two American naval vessels are captured by two Royal Navy vessels of equal strength.
HMS Phoebe (36) and HMS Cherub (18) under Cptn. James Hillyar capture USS Essex (46), Cptn. David Porter, off Valparaiso, Chile.

The Battle of Valparaíso, also called the Capture of USS Essex, was a naval action fought during the War of 1812. It took place off Valparaíso, Chile on March 28, 1814 between the frigate USS Essex and the sloop USS Essex Junior of the United States Navyand the frigate HMS Phoebe and sloop HMS Cherub of the Royal Navy. The British ships won the battle, and the American vessels were captured.
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1815 – Launch of HMS Howe, a 120-gun first-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, at Chatham.
Howe was broken up in 1854.
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1861 – Launch of French ironclad Couronne ("Crown"), the first iron-hulled ironclad warship built for the French Navy in 1859–62.
She was the first such ship to be laid down, although the British armoured frigate HMS Warrior was completed first.

The French ironclad Couronne ("Crown") was the first iron-hulled ironclad warship built for the French Navy in 1859–62. She was the first such ship to be laid down, although the British armoured frigate HMS Warrior was completed first. The ship participated in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870–71, but saw no combat. She was served as a gunnery training ship from 1885 to 1908 before she was hulked the following year and became a barracks ship in Toulon. Couronne was scrapped in 1934, over 70 years after she was completed.
Couronne-bougault-2.jpg


1896 – Launch of USS Iowa (BB-4), a United States Navy battleship
USS Iowa (BB-4)
was a United States Navy battleship. Launched in 1896, it was the first ship commissioned in honor of Iowa and was America's first seagoing battleship. Iowa saw substantial action in the Spanish–American War. While she was an improvement over the Indiana class because of a superior design, the warship became obsolete quickly in the first quarter of the 20th century and was used for target practice and sunk on 23 March 1923 in Panama Bay by a salvo of 14-inch shells
Iowa_(BB4)._Port_bow,_entering_drydock,_09-01-1898_-_NARA_-_535433.tif.jpg


1914 – Launch of Fusō (扶桑, a classical name for Japan), the lead ship of the two Fusō-class dreadnought battleships built for the Imperial Japanese Navy.
Fusō (扶桑, a classical name for Japan) was the lead ship of the two Fusō-class dreadnought battleships built for the Imperial Japanese Navy. Launched in 1914 and commissioned in 1915, she initially patrolled off the coast of China, playing no part in World War I. In 1923, she assisted survivors of the Great Kantō earthquake.
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