French 8 pounder frigate La Castor, from Le Renommee draught by Jean Boudriot, Combination method, Bread and butter and plank on rib.

Squarebriggs

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2019
Messages
90
Points
103

Location
Miramichi, NB, Canada
Began to build a model of the French 8 pounder frigate La castor, built in Quebec City at the Royal Dockyard, by R.N. Lavasseur, master shipwright. I am basing it on the plan for Le Renommee, of 1744, of the same class. I am building her in the combination method, lower hull bread and butter, upper hull plank on rib. It is a method that I enjoy working in as I do not show the lower hull construction.

the builders.jpgbeginnings.jpgfirst steps.jpgbeginnings 2.jpg
 

Uwek

Admin
Staff member
Administrative
Blandford Group Build
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
9,835
Points
728

Location
Vienna, Austria
Great that you started this building log of your Le Castor. Especially because of the different way of hull construction - very interesting by the way.

Please allow me to make here the link to the Planset Review of the Renommee, so all the members of your log knows which kind of ship you build:

 

Giancarlo 60

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2018
Messages
48
Points
68

Confermo , una splendida fregata dalle linee belle e molto accattivante . Ottima scelta e ottimo lavoro ti seguirò con molto interesse .
I confirm, a splendid frigate with beautiful lines and very captivating. Excellent choice and great job I will follow you with a lot of interest
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Squarebriggs

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2019
Messages
90
Points
103

Location
Miramichi, NB, Canada
Today I had my apprentice here for his lesson, and afterwards, constructed the building cradle for holding the hull while working on it.

To answer Uwek's question, I cut out card stock with the hull contour at each rib and hold them against the hull to check for accuracy and adjust as necessary. Photo of stations attached.

Bobbuilding cradle.jpghull contour stations.jpg
 

neptune

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 25, 2017
Messages
1,469
Points
433

Location
Australia.
Very nice work, I love to see the hulls being carved, its such a hands on experience, I might have missed it but what sort of wood are you carving from, on the small hulls that I carve I use Jellutong, enjoy,

best regards John,
 

Squarebriggs

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2019
Messages
90
Points
103

Location
Miramichi, NB, Canada
Very nice work, I love to see the hulls being carved, its such a hands on experience, I might have missed it but what sort of wood are you carving from, on the small hulls that I carve I use Jellutong, enjoy,

best regards John,
Thank you John, I use clear/select White Pine for the hull. It will act as a base for the planking and ribs yet to be applied. I will use Pear wood for the hull planking and the ribs. I enjoy carving and have used this method for many years. I make a lot of Half Models, and have plenty of experience in carving hulls, so it is a very enjoyable method for me. I have been scratch building for 45+ years, and learned from reading some great books on modelling. A couple of my favorites are: Modelling the Brig of War Irene, by E.W. Petrejus; Period Ship Modelmaking by Philip Reed, Modelling Sailing Men-of-War, also by Reed, and Building a Miniature Navy Board Model, also by Reed, and my all time favorite, The Art of Ship Modelling by Bernard Frolich.

Bob
 

Squarebriggs

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2019
Messages
90
Points
103

Location
Miramichi, NB, Canada
Good afternoon all, another beautiful day here in the back woods of Northern New Brunswick, Canada. I began the process of planking the lower deck today, slow but sure. I am using Maple planks, and find them quite a bit harder than the Basswood ones I usually use, but hope the colour difference will be worth it. Both should be correct for the scale and texture and colour of the vessel. I rub a soft pencil along the edge of the planks to simulate the tar of caulking and it usually serves.

I realize that my method of building is somewhat different from what the "experts" do, but I enjoy this method, and when you learn by yourself in oblivion with no access to a teacher or a mentor, just learning from what ever books are available, you make do. I am pleased with my finished products, so that is what is important.

Bobbegin planking.jpgbegin planking deck.jpgbegin planking deck 2.jpg
 

Squarebriggs

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2019
Messages
90
Points
103

Location
Miramichi, NB, Canada
Making progress slowly on the deck planking. It makes me think about how difficult it would have been planking the deck on the real vessel. like my Great Grandfather did in his shipyard in Prince Edward Island, here in Canada. Now they didn't build ships as large as this one, just brigs, brigantines and schooners, but still the process is the same just a larger scale.planking continued.jpgplanking continued 2.jpgplanking continued 3.jpgprogress.jpg
 

Squarebriggs

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2019
Messages
90
Points
103

Location
Miramichi, NB, Canada
Hi,
At the right of the pic, what are these ?
View attachment 107760
Those are canes that I carve. The first one is a dragon modelled after Smaug from the movie, The Hobbit. Then there is a : Lion, Tiger, Leopard, Cheetah, Golden Eagle, Harris Hawk, Wolf, and a Dutch Dragoon flintlock pistol cane. There are also some walking staffs: another Smaug, and two Bald Eagles. They are all for sale if interested.

Bob

Bob
 
Top