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French 8 pounder frigate La Castor, from Le Renommee draught by Jean Boudroit, Combination method, Bread and butter and plank on rib.

Squarebriggs

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Work continues on the deck, plank by plank. A slow but satisfying process. I so much enjoy the process, watching as a piece of crude wood takes shape into a work of art, a sailing ship of the 18th century, the wonder of technology of the period. This vessel has special significance to me, being built here in Canada just before the British invasion of 1758, first to Louisburg and then to Quebec. I have a piece of rope from the wreck of one of the ships of that invasion fleet, HMS Invincible, lost on the way over, and the wreck found recently by a fisherman/diver who recovered artifacts from her. planking.jpgplanking 2.jpgplanking 3.jpgplanking 4.jpgplanking 5.jpg
 

Squarebriggs

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Your planking pattern (3 butts I think) is looking very good - it will be beautiful looking after it is oiled (or what´s ever you do)
Will you do also some tree-nailing of the deck?
Yes, will be using copper nails, drill and then insert, snip off the heads. I will be oiling the deck and then a varnish to finish it.

Bob
 

Uwek

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Work continues at a slow pace doing the nailing of the deck. I am using the small copper nails that I mentioned and am making good progress. I have tried to show the process in these video's, but the files are too large to load.

Bob

View attachment 109052
The video would be interesting to see......the easiest way is to upload them to youtube and make here a link to the youtube video.......
 

Squarebriggs

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I may be the dumbest ship modeller here, cause I can't seem to get a video on to YouTube. Oh well, I'll stick to the speed I am use to, one nail at a time, one ship at a time. Sorry folks, but I'll have to stick to still photos. I spent the week-end drilling holes and driving copper nails into them. It takes a lot of nails to do the deck properly, so I am still at it.

Bobnailing deck.jpgnailing deck 2.jpgnailing deck 3.jpgprogress.jpg
 

Squarebriggs

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Miramichi, NB, Canada
One step at a time. Ship modelling is a slow process and one that brings me much joy and satisfaction. Each little piece that is created goes to show a builders determination, patience and skill. I get my encouragement from observing the efforts of others, get inspired from others models and from the actual ships and the sea, paintings and images, they all bring me back to life at sea, something I miss every day. Books, paintings, models, and movies are my way of staying in touch with the life.

Today, a small part of the whole, the capstain. Made from 25 pieces, each carved to fit, in Pear, Birch, Maple and Ebony, it stands 1 1/4" x 3/4".

Bob
capstain 2.jpgcapstain.jpgcapastin 3.jpg
 

Squarebriggs

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Miramichi, NB, Canada
It has been a couple of weeks since I last posted progress pictures, and I am sure the members here are very familiar with how much effort can be required for little to show for it. I have been working on getting the next deck level mounted, so first the skeleton must be formed. Ribs, 58 in number, cut, shaped and sanded, two pieces per rib, and two ribs required, one for each side, then a deck beam and finally some supports for the deck beam in the form of knees. I wish I had the secret of how some of our more skilled members get such perfect joints and polished pieces, but I will have to accept that what I produce is the best that I can manage. Assembly takes patience, and there are times when I feel that my fingers are rough sausages, and just wouldn't work as required, but I persist and manage. This method of building is called the "combination" method, part "bread and butter" and part "plank on frame", a method that I learned through several books on ship modelling. I like it.

Bob
ribs.jpgframing.jpgfirst frame.jpgfirst frame 2.jpgnext frame.jpgframing started.jpg
 

NMBROOK

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Very nice carving work on the lower hull,not so easy with the lines of Renommee especially the pronounced tumblehome.Do you pin or dowel the frames to the lower hull or rely on a straight butt glue joint?

Kind Regards

Nigel
 

Squarebriggs

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Location
Miramichi, NB, Canada
Very nice carving work on the lower hull,not so easy with the lines of Renommee especially the pronounced tumblehome.Do you pin or dowel the frames to the lower hull or rely on a straight butt glue joint?

Kind Regards

Nigel
I pin and glue them, drill pilot holes and drive brass/copper nails in.

Bob
 
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