Gilles' 17-inch canoe - Cherry wood - Canoe # 2 [COMPLETED BUILD]

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17 looks darker and has a sheen from the light that the 19 does not. I was thinking about an oil finish but will try a small sample to compare with varnish. Do you brush that on? (which is what I would be doing) PT-2
You absolutely amaze me even though I know that you have been crafting these canoes for 20 +/- years how many and how fast you have shown these on the SoS forum. Quite a material consumption as well as time! Skill and experience have a lot to support that. PT-2
 
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You absolutely amaze me even though I know that you have been crafting these canoes for 20 +/- years how many and how fast you have shown these on the SoS forum. Quite a material consumption as well as time! Skill and experience have a lot to support that. PT-2

The main goal here is not so much to showcase my work but it really is to inspire other builders to pay attention to certain things in model building with wood.
As far as I am concerned, the model itself is irrelevant, viewers can like a model or another it does not matter Besides the builder taking great pleasure in the construction, ultimately the pleasure of the viewer resides in the details and the workmanship: lines, curves, woodwork including joinery (very important), how everything is put together and lastly finish.
The lumber for the canoe may be lightly or grossly out of scale, the decks, the seats, etc... may be too long, the subject may not be of any interest to some or even most, the model may not be to anyone's taste, but the modeler should have done the best he / she could in the craftsmanship department as the model is being built. The bottom line is that I believe most modelers should dig deep into their abilities and that is something all should keep in mind when building.
Whether it is for laying strips or shaping a deck, I probably spend more time making sure that things fit right than actual assembly with glue in hand... and if does not fit right, well, I figure out why and try to fix it. Is it perfect? absolutely not...

A canoe model does not need to be a work of art. It does not need to be historically or traditionally correct. What makes it a work of art is the way it was built: attention to details. In my opinion, this is true for every model one may ever build. But a basic, uncomplicated model such as a small water craft is the best training ground, a good first step in more intricate ventures. A good way to inspire oneself to always push to do better. Better in the construction of the next model, Yes, but why wait, do the best you can on the model you are building right now. And I do believe that this is a valuable mind set for a modeler to have... before actually starting to work on his / her model ... and then follow through. It all begins before glue is used...
G
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2020
Messages
3,109
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588

Location
Eugene, Oregon
The main goal here is not so much to showcase my work but it really is to inspire other builders to pay attention to certain things in model building with wood.
As far as I am concerned, the model itself is irrelevant, viewers can like a model or another it does not matter Besides the builder taking great pleasure in the construction, ultimately the pleasure of the viewer resides in the details and the workmanship: lines, curves, woodwork including joinery (very important), how everything is put together and lastly finish.
The lumber for the canoe may be lightly or grossly out of scale, the decks, the seats, etc... may be too long, the subject may not be of any interest to some or even most, the model may not be to anyone's taste, but the modeler should have done the best he / she could in the craftsmanship department as the model is being built. The bottom line is that I believe most modelers should dig deep into their abilities and that is something all should keep in mind when building.
Whether it is for laying strips or shaping a deck, I probably spend more time making sure that things fit right than actual assembly with glue in hand... and if does not fit right, well, I figure out why and try to fix it. Is it perfect? absolutely not...

A canoe model does not need to be a work of art. It does not need to be historically or traditionally correct. What makes it a work of art is the way it was built: attention to details. In my opinion, this is true for every model one may ever build. But a basic, uncomplicated model such as a small water craft is the best training ground, a good first step in more intricate ventures. A good way to inspire oneself to always push to do better. Better in the construction of the next model, Yes, but why wait, do the best you can on the model you are building right now. And I do believe that this is a valuable mind set for a modeler to have... before actually starting to work on his / her model ... and then follow through. It all begins before glue is used...
G
That is a deeply felt and well worded admonition and philosophical view that fully support. Thank you. PT-2
 
Joined
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17 looks darker and has a sheen from the light that the 19 does not. I was thinking about an oil finish but will try a small sample to compare with varnish. Do you brush that on? (which is what I would be doing) PT-2
After my first light coat on the outside. The cherry is not as dark as I thought it would be. I've done a second light sanding, wiped it down and applied the second coat to dry while I weave the stern seat today and make a pattern for two paddles. What species did you use for the canoes that you show us lastly? PT-2
 
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This is what the 17-inch canoe looks like as of today: equipped with the decks.
Have to do a bit of cleanup on the outside including light fine sanding and it will be time for finishing.

View attachment 174375

I know, some may wonder why the decks of my canoe models are much longer than the typical deck on the typical real canoe. Well, it makes for a distinctive look...
Keeping the proportions in mind, the decks on this canoe are shorter than what I normally do these days, but I do need a certain length to keep the appearance and shape in line with the others.

G.
I like the way that you overlaid your decks and then "stepped" them down between the innerwales. I also think that I see that you tapered the sides of the added floor boards on their ends toward the keel. That looks nice and I hadn't thought of it first time around. PT -2
 
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Location
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After my first light coat on the outside. The cherry is not as dark as I thought it would be. I've done a second light sanding, wiped it down and applied the second coat to dry while I weave the stern seat today and make a pattern for two paddles. What species did you use for the canoes that you show us lastly? PT-2

Seat frame = cherry
Paddles = birch

In the end, are you using water based or oil based varnish?
The water based will give you a lighter tone. The varnish is cloudy white-(ish)
Oil based will darken the cherry. The varnish is clear and darker.
But I am sure you already know that...

G
 
Last edited:
Joined
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Messages
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Location
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Except for the paddles, this 17-inch canoe is finished:
Varnished was applied inside and outside.
Seat and yoke installed.

View attachment 177402

G.
Another very nice canoe to expand your fleet. With the numbers that it seems that you have, if an outsider saw them they may try to call for a rental paddle but you may talk them into a purchase if they have a carrier. I was thinking that you were going to install those nice carrying thwarts but don't see one. PT-2
 
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