H.M.S Enterprise plank on frame CAF Models 1/48.

Jimsky

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Brian, I don't think there should correct or incorrect order as when to install the whales. It just a matter of preference. I also like to install whales after finishing planking. This way I can clean planking to great finish...
Happy Holidays folks!!!
 
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Peglegreg

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Brian, I don't think there should correct or incorrect order as when to install the whales. It just a matter of preference. I also like to install whales after finishing planking. This way I can clean planking to great finish...
Happy Holidays folks!!!
G'day Jim
Doing a model? Your statement is correct, but on the 'real deal' the Wales goes on first and the planking butt up to it. A little case of trivia for you.
 

Jimsky

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Doing a model? Your statement is correct, but on the 'real deal'
@Peglegreg Hovadoing Greg. Yea, I am building a model (at least before this post I thought, I do...LOL). Just follow my signature link if you have interest...
As for the real deal, The wales where a series of heavy planks, the position of which is shown on the plan. They were about the same width as the hull plunking, but where thicker with the result that they projected 3-4 ins beyond the planking on 16th and 17th-century ships, and 2-3ins on 18th and 19th-century vessels.
Their top and bottom edges were very slightly rounded off. These wales were attached to the frames before the planking.

Here is little trivia for you, Greg: do we build our models as 'real deal'? Did the plywood acceptable as bulkheads and Pearwood as the hull planking material?
:)
 

Maarten

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Hi gents,

Its all a matter of how far we would like to go in detailing to get as close to the real deal. Most important is having fun in doing it. Personally I love to see the wales follow the flow of the planks as it enhances the shapes of the ship and this you can also do while first fitting the planks.
 

janos

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Hi Guys
Turkish Boxwood had been mentioned a while ago as well as recently. I also ordered some from Octopus ( http://store.octopus.com.tr ) about 2 years ago. I am in two minds about it. Some pieces are pretty good, some are worse. They primarily supply material for musical instruments and their quality is sometimes just not good enough for carving. For planking, yes, I even find it a bit too good for that, but for carving, not always so good. Some of their pieces have distinctive brown stripes in it (I assume this can be a consequence of the slightly warmer climate and quicker growing as a consequence) and this is not only a colour distruction, but also means softer sections. Turkish Boxwood shows its grain more pronounced than the European one. Generally I value Turkish Boxwood as a distant second after European Boxwood, but still with a good pace ahead of the different (according to Dave about 160) kinds of Costelo (also called Honduras or South American Boxwood ). These latter species are absolutely beautiful for planking and also deck furnitures and for nearly everything as well as for not so miniature carving.
Actually I just found one really good one among my Turkish pieces recently, the quality of which is very close to the European Box. Hence the two minds of me on this issue.
Just my 2 cents.
Janos
 

Brian077

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Agree with your comments about Turkish boxwood Janos.
It does have some areas of dark brown woodgrain through the wood, but I trim that off with my bandsaw. Its super bendy, and very flexible to bend without heat or water.
 

Brian077

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Hi Greg,
to answer your question about my clamps, the wood is straight but its 1 mm thick deck planking so I like to squeeze them together tightly.
And regards to making my deck gratings, that's too tedious for me. I am going to purchase better ones.
 

Maarten

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The kit supplied decking grates are very flimsy and are difficult to separate.
They break easily and I think I will discard them and look for some aftermarket grates. Anyone know or recommend any suppliers please ?

.View attachment 69741
Hi Brian,

You can try to steam them first before separating, it avoids easy breaking a little and disolves packed dust.
 
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