Saint Albans 1687 in Navy Board Style - 1 : 48 scale

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The windows were sawn from 1 mm acrylic glass. The window bars were transferred from the plan with a scriber and then scored with a fine saw blade (0.6 mm). In order not to scratch the sensitive acrylic glasses, a transparent plastic film (airbrush film) was stuck onto the saw table. Sawing in these graded angles with pretty small contact surfaces was extremely tricky. Either it succeeds immediately or 4/5 repetitions are necessary. So the result is only 98 percent accurate.

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The scratches were filled with diluted black oil paint and after several hours of drying time, the excess paint can be removed with a cloth. The color only remains in the scars and beautifully simulates the fine bars.

I had to make the upper counter twice. The first try was too narrow and the carving wasn't good either. But also my second attempt doesn't match the original either. The ancestors show me again and again who's Number One.

But this is an opportunity to show , how the various radii were sawen out. To make it absolutely symmetrical, I took a saw setting for both sides of the timber.

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Greetings, Alexander
 
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The windows were sawn from 1 mm acrylic glass. The window bars were transferred from the plan with a scriber and then scored with a fine saw blade (0.6 mm). In order not to scratch the sensitive acrylic glasses, a transparent plastic film (airbrush film) was stuck onto the saw table. Sawing in these graded angles with pretty small contact surfaces was extremely tricky. Either it succeeds immediately or 4/5 repetitions are necessary. So the result is only 98 percent accurate.

View attachment 223328

View attachment 223329

The scratches were filled with diluted black oil paint and after several hours of drying time, the excess paint can be removed with a cloth. The color only remains in the scars and beautifully simulates the fine bars.

I had to make the upper counter twice. The first try was too narrow and the carving wasn't good either. But also my second attempt doesn't match the original either. The ancestors show me again and again who's Number One.

But this is an opportunity to show , how the various radii were sawen out. To make it absolutely symmetrical, I took a saw setting for both sides of the timber.

View attachment 223330

View attachment 223331

View attachment 223332

Greetings, Alexander
Thanks for the "etching" technique you used on the window's to create/simulate the panes. I have some microscope slide covers I had planned on attempting to cut but will also look into and order acrylic glass in case I can't master glass panes.
 

Maarten

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Thanks for the "etching" technique you used on the window's to create/simulate the panes. I have some microscope slide covers I had planned on attempting to cut but will also look into and order acrylic glass in case I can't master glass panes.
Hi Brad,

One tip when you use microscope glass, use a flexible glue, otherwise it will crack over time due to stress in the glass as a result of expansion and shrink of the wood due to temperature and climate.
 
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Hi Brad,

One tip when you use microscope glass, use a flexible glue, otherwise it will crack over time due to stress in the glass as a result of expansion and shrink of the wood due to temperature and climate.
Thanks for the tip Maarten!
 

Uwek

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Sluggish progress but at least a little bit forward.

Dogs and naked toddlers are the theme of St. Albans. Does that have an allegorical meaning?

View attachment 231975

wish a nice weekend
Cheers Alexander
Looking very good, especially when we realize how small these ornaments are compared to the Eurocent.
Allegorical meaning, maybe Willi alias @schifferlbauer can answer it ?
 
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Hello dear Uwe

The question was meant more rhetorically. I believe that only the largest ships in a fleet (ships of the first rate and, with some restrictions, those of the second rate) had a sophisticated allegorical program. Vasa or Sovereign of the Seas, for example, have many allegorical references which follow an distinct iconographic program.
On the other hand, Saint Albans, as a fouth rate ship, has much simpler decorations.

In the Baroque era, the putti actually only have a meaning when they wear something in their hand / on their head or when they are doing something.
Here they support the acanthus tendrils, which gives the decoration liveliness and space.

Dogs are seen less often, so they stand out a bit on the Saint Albans model. There are more dogs there than just these two.
The dog generally stands for loyalty and love.

I found the following example in a French emblem manual ("Morosophie" Guillaume de la Perrière, Toulouse 1553).

Dog and rabbit hold a crown

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The description of this picture says:

"The prince, who wants his virtue to flourish and to see his fame spread everywhere, must be feared and loved by his own in order to secure a scepter and a crown. This will make his name sound good, and his subjects will honor him day and night. The rabbit is afraid, the dog loves him. The two enemies keep a firm peace, fear and love secure the king's throne. Dog and rabbit support the crown."

Cheers, Alexander
 
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