San Juan Nepomuceno. 74c ship of the line 1766.

Jaime R

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Good evening fellow modellers!

I start this thread to show you how I’m making this incredible ship of the line, representing it as it fought in Trafalgar.

The kit itself has many weaknesses due to, I suppose, commercial reasons so I take the instructions as “suggestions” and really follow the documents and information that I get from some experts, the internet and the MNM (Naval Museum of Madrid).

One of these experts is Alejandro Yáñez who, time ago, wrote a monograph about the Nepomuceno that is truly useful, besides, is free to download for everyone who was interested in it!!!

I started the kit in October 2016 and devoting 2-3 hours a day average, but I spend lots of time thinking in how to do things better and repeating parts that are not satisfactory.

I’ve discarded most of the die cast parts, in my opinion are terrible, not only in their awful shape but in the quality of the metal.

Here you have the first round of pictures of my work. Please ask whatever you want and feel free to criticize as the better way to improve.

Greetings
JaimeSoS1_01.jpgSoS1_02.jpgSoS1_04.jpgSoS1_06.jpgSoS1_07.jpgSoS1_08.jpgSoS1_10.jpgSoS1_11.jpgSoS1_12.jpgSoS1_13.jpg
 

Uwek

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The last photo of the stern with rudder etc. summarize the real good workmanship
The very realistic weathering of the copper - here you should once explain how you did it to get this result!!
But also interesting how you did the nailing pattern for the copper plates ?
The Ropes and chains of the rudder - great detail
The openings for the captains toilets - great detail
 

El Capi

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Good evening fellow modellers!

I start this thread to show you how I’m making this incredible ship of the line, representing it as it fought in Trafalgar.

The kit itself has many weaknesses due to, I suppose, commercial reasons so I take the instructions as “suggestions” and really follow the documents and information that I get from some experts, the internet and the MNM (Naval Museum of Madrid).

One of these experts is Alejandro Yáñez who, time ago, wrote a monograph about the Nepomuceno that is truly useful, besides, is free to download for everyone who was interested in it!!!

I started the kit in October 2016 and devoting 2-3 hours a day average, but I spend lots of time thinking in how to do things better and repeating parts that are not satisfactory.

I’ve discarded most of the die cast parts, in my opinion are terrible, not only in their awful shape but in the quality of the metal.

Here you have the first round of pictures of my work. Please ask whatever you want and feel free to criticize as the better way to improve.

Greetings
JaimeView attachment 74041View attachment 74042View attachment 74043View attachment 74044View attachment 74045View attachment 74046View attachment 74047View attachment 74048View attachment 74049View attachment 74050
 

Jaime R

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Good morning fellow modellers.
In the next lines I'll try to explain how I could achive these results with the coppering of the hull.

I used a roll of self-adhesive tape of copper (made for electric purposes in musical stuff). Fortunately, its width is quite accurate for the scale of the ship, 5mm. I make plates of 2cm long and at last I made around 1900 plates. Each one has two types of rivets. The ones in the edges (smaller and closer) and the ones in the center (bigger and more separate). For that purpose I use two types of wheels, the Trumpeter rivet marker and other one used for sewing and properly adapted.

For the ageing of the copper there are, at least, three methods: Chemical, covered with paint or the one I've used with glaze and dry brushing.

The glaze and dry brushing system consists in several and alternative aplications of this methods. First of all, I applied a layer of satin varnish in spray in order to protect and fix the plates. It also serves as primming.
Then, I apply a layer of light green with dry-brushing, after that, a watery application of a smoke patina that goes into all the hidden corners and "kill" the shiny green (repeat both steps until the result is satisfactory) and at the end, a very, very subtle dry brush of copper colour. As a finish, another layer of satin barnish and that's all.

Now the pictures...
 

Donnie

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You are welcome. So, what brand, or type of shade yellow is that on hull?
 

Jaime R

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Hi Donnie, I’ve used the ramin wood stripes provided in the kit and, taken advantage that are very clear, I soaked them in yellow wood ink. After installing I aged the area with an ocre glaze.

The black part of the hull is mahogany dyed in black ink. The ageing is with grey applied with dry brush.

The advantage of using ink instead of paint is that you preserve the surface of wood and you get the pieces perfectly delimitated.

Greetings
Jaime
 

Donnie

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My gosh!! Now I would have never thought of that. Yellow ink? I need to learn more about this technique. Where in the world do I find yellow or maybe a red ink. I guess at a craft store.
 
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