Sao Gabriel 1/100 scratch

0Seahorse

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Hello
Some time ago I started building Sao Gabriel based on the model in the museum in Lisbon. I do not have exact plans, but based on photos, dimensions and proportions of this type of vessels I managed to design a ship quite similar to the original one in Lisbon. The progress in the construction is enough to show the first photos.
The hull frames were made of 1 mm thick cardboard.




I have planned three layers of planking: the first vertical layer, which stabilizes the frames, the second longitudinal one on the cardboard 0.5 mm and the third one in color as the final planks. After gluing the first layer, I added some of the decks and evened the entire hull with sandpaper to remove adhesive residues and greater inaccuracies.





On the parts you can see lines according to which I will glue the next layer.
Before sticking the next decks, I had to make a few details, to which the later access would be very difficult.



Then I glued the second layer, so far only to the level of the main deck and then I built a part of the forecastle.




The construction of the forecastle...



Then, step by step, I added the next strips of the second layer and the next level in the forecastle.



Because the model has a lot of windows in the stern part, I created some rooms there. Unfortunately, there are not many sources describing rooms in sailing ships from this period, so this is only my imagination.



Now I could "close" the whole with the upper decks.




Before gluing the last layer, the whole hull was covered with wood glue, which made it stiffer. I smoothed the whole with sandpaper and started gluing the last layer. Each strip consists of two planks with a dividing line marked with the blunt needle.



Visible white gaps will be covered with wales, so at the end it will look OK.

Best
Tomek
 

Moxis

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Hello Tomek. Very nice work indeed. I have one question: How did you make the coloring of planks, painted them or printed with computer?
 

Peglegreg

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G'day Tomek
Thank you so much for sharing this build with us.
I can't believe it's paper and cardboard, it looks so real.
I will be watching this project with great interest.
 

0Seahorse

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Thank you,
@Dicas@ Honestly, there are a few elements that I cannot "decipher" in the pictures. The first are the lower yards halyards - I can not see if there is a tackle with a ramshead block and a knighthead, or maybe there is a simpler solution in the form of a block attached to the deck. I have some knowledge about rigging and something I would eventually conclude, but I would like to be as close as possible to the original from the museum.

@Moxis@ All parts are printed in color. I do not paint almost anything. The exception are the white cut edges, which you need to paint with the right color, and black parts, because first I save the black ink :), secondly the black prints are not black and it is very difficult to match the color of the paint to the color of the print (to hide white cut edges)

Greg, thank you.

Best
Tomek
 

Dicas

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Thank you,
@Dicas@ Honestly, there are a few elements that I cannot "decipher" in the pictures. The first are the lower yards halyards - I can not see if there is a tackle with a ramshead block and a knighthead, or maybe there is a simpler solution in the form of a block attached to the deck. I have some knowledge about rigging and something I would eventually conclude, but I would like to be as close as possible to the original from the museum.

OK, Tomek, I'll visit the Museum and take some pictures one maybe this week or the next.

I have to translate what you want, though, because I don't speak very good "marine" and I need to translate those nautical terms. :cool::cool:

Regards

JL
 
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0Seahorse

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OK, Tomek, I'll visit the Museum and take some pictures one maybe this week or the next.

I have to translate what you want, though, because I don't speak very good "marine" and I need to translate those nautical terms. :cool::cool:

Regards

JL
I did not want to bother you with going to the museum especially for me. It was rather a question for someone who can remember or know. But if you have nice weather in Lisbon (in my region it is -10 degrees C) and decide to go on a trip to the museum, then halyard is a rope or a set of ropes used for lifting the yard. In the photos that I have, I can not see what's on the deck around the main mast nad how to arrange this space. I attach a picture about halyards from "Historic Ship Models" by W. zu Mondfeld. It shows later period, but you have the nautical terms there.

Regards
Tomek
halyards Mondfeld.jpg
 

Dicas

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No problem, we have 14ºC here and sun, and the trip to the museum takes 15m by tramway. I don't even pay because I am more than 65y.

So, next week I'll make a trip to Museu da Marinha and take some photos. It is a nice museum in a very beautiful monument (Jeronimos).

Regards

JL
 
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0Seahorse

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Hi,
I built 99% of the hull and its details. All parts with a thickness of +1 mm were cut from cardboard and glued on three sides with stripes of appropriate width. For sure the construction would have been faster if I just painted these parts.

kad 01.jpgkad 03.jpgkad 05.jpgkad 08a.jpgkad 09.jpgkad 10.jpgkad 11a.jpgkad 12.jpgkad 14.jpgkad 15.jpgkad 18.jpg

Best
Tomek
 

Dicas

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Tomek I didn't forget my visit to the Museum, but there is some bad weather here, so maybe next week, let's hope it gets better

Regards

JL
 

0Seahorse

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Tomek I didn't forget my visit to the Museum, but there is some bad weather here, so maybe next week, let's hope it gets better

Regards

JL
There is no hurry :) I have some more to build before I put on yards.

Best
 

Jimsky

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great build Tomek, considering this is paper (cardboard)! Please keep those pictures coming to us! You mention that do not have plans, can you tell us how do you design frames\bukheads?
 

0Seahorse

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great build Tomek, considering this is paper (cardboard)! Please keep those pictures coming to us! You mention that do not have plans, can you tell us how do you design frames\bukheads?
It will not be easy for me to describe the design, because English is not my native language. And Google Translator is sometimes worse than me.

1. I do not have the plans of Sao Gabriel, but I have some sketches, drawings and books on the basis of which I determined the approximate shape of the hull. Still, I do not know if my model is "thinner" by 20% or "higher" than the one in the museum, because ...

2. I do not aspire to be an outstanding historian and researcher of the construction of old sailing ships and I treat it as a joyful hobby. If I make any mistakes, I still can sleep peacefully without nightmares:).

3. I prepare the models in Rhinoceros3D, in which there is a function that allows you to correct the surface through curves or even individual points and updates these changes on a regular basis. (certainly other programs also have such functions)

4. Having estimated the basic dimensions, I drew the main curves, built surfaces on them and corrected the shapes. It took ages.

5. All this effort concerned only the hull to the level of the main deck, because I decided that the castles are so simple that I can design them without any quirky tricks. And the underwater part of the hull was also not complicated in a special way, relatively rounded except for the stern part, from which I am not satisfied and there may be some cardinal errors.

6. You can guess, then, that my model may be different from the museum's original in almost every place.

7. To sum up: I definitely prefer to design based on ready-made plans and Sao Gabriel is my experiment, which took a lot of time, too much time :)

8. Based on some "better" sketches and plans, I designed a long time ago Muleta de Seixal, a typical trabaccolo, Genoese saettia ...

... "Duyfken" was created with the help of Ab Hoving ...

Based on relatively complete plans, I have recently designed two cutters for the "Modelarstwo Okrętowe" publishing house and a boat from Gokstadt.
In all these projects there are definitely historical mistakes but "errare humanum est"


I hope that I have explained the whole process a bit.

greetings
Tomek
 

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Dicas

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2. I do not aspire to be an outstanding historian and researcher of the construction of old sailing ships and I treat it as a joyful hobby. If I make any mistakes, I still can sleep peacefully without nightmares:).
Agree 100% . Me too, I am not a professional and all I do is for my pleasure, I look for pleasure, not headaches.

Regards

JL
 

0Seahorse

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Thank you very much. Pictures will be very helpful. I hope that the trip itself was nice too :)
Best
Tomek
 

0Seahorse

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Hello,
it took me incredibly a lot of time to finish a few details, the all rest is begun and in a continuous "unfinished stage", but some photos on which you can see the differences are already there. I made pumps, artillery and fife rails (if it is the name of it on very old ships). I also made the boat (6 cm). I did not quest for inventing new technologies: I glued the frames onto the upper surface (0.5 mm), covered with parts with color inside and laid the planks from the outside (all steps on the photos). I added an additional layer simulating the benches and imitating 3D. The oars were made of toothpicks (wooden, not bamboo). There are also some new eyebolts for tying ropes and sheave holes in bulwarks.
szalupa 01.jpgszalupa 02.jpgszalupa 03.jpgszalupa 04.jpgszalupa 06.jpgszalupa 08.jpgszalupa 10.jpgszalupa 11.jpgszalupa 12.jpgszalupa 13.jpgszalupa 14.jpg

Best
Tomek
 
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