Trumpeter DKM U-Boat Type VIIC U-552

Jim Lauser

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The next room in the assembly is the diesel room. Only 1 of the diesels is presented in the model, the real sub would have both a port and starboard engines. The following 7 shows variousw stages in the engine assembly. The total assembly used approx. 115 pieces, of which 42 are in the valve rocker arm assembly. These 4 pics show the block and head assembly, the details of 1 cylinder rocker assemblies, the completed rocker aqssembly from both the rear and front of the engine.

sos116sos.JPGsos117sos.JPGsos118sos.JPGsos119sos.JPG
 

kiwibob

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Great build thanks for sharing http://www.shipsofscale.com/sosforums/posting.php?mode=reply&f=93&t=1094#
 

Donnie

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Its when you place the assembly next to lighter is when the miniaturization really shows. I guess you can only work on this just for so long and it seems that you would get fatigued after awhile. The amount of parts to detail is really something. It's not like they give you the whole assembly (engine) already done.
I also assume that each assembly is packaged in its own bag.
Donnie
 

Jim Lauser

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Hi Donnie
To give you an idea of the steps involved in the construction of the diesel engine, I have attached two pages from the build manual. The references to the pieces (eg S19) indicates the frame letter (S - there were 24 frames in the kit) and then part number 19 on that frame. Depending on the assembly, multiple frames may be indicated. Also, there is a separate painting guide in the kit for the various colors involved. All told, the diesel engine is the most complicated build in the kit so far. Yet, the best is yet to come, the painting of the hull which will have to be done by air brushing. More to come.

VIIC Diesel 1.jpgVIIC Diesel 2.jpg
 

Jim Lauser

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However the Germans managed to do it, the rocker arm assembly did not have valve covers on the diesels.
If you do a search on 'pictures inside a german U-boat', and follow the first link, there are a bunch of pictures taken inside U-995 (a museum boat). If you scroll down through the pics you will get to a pic of the diesel that looks just like the one in my model - no valve covers.
Also, if you watch the movie "Das Boot" (The Boat) there is a scene wherein a crew member is standing right next to one on the running diesels and all the rocker arms are rocking away in plain sight.
Jim
 

Jim Lauser

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Many, many years ago, before Das Boot was released in the US, I happened to get a copy of the original German TV movie. The original movie is over 6 hours long and the version was dubbed in English. When the movie was first released in the US as Das Boot, it was subtitled and did not go over well. It was later re-released as The Boat and dubbed in English. It is hard to watch that movie and not sweat . I just can not imagine actually serving in one of those boats.
 

Jim Lauser

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This next group of pics shows the assembly of the diesel motor with the other pieces of the diesel room. This first pic shows the pieces that make up the engine room.

DSC_0007@96sos.JPG
 

Jim Lauser

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This pic shows the details of the compartment roof. There are approx. 30 separate pieces in the assembly. Please excuse the lousy paint job of the wires.

DSC_0016@96sos.JPG

 

Donnie

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Jim,
I always look forward to your updates. I think I have asked this before.
Do the instructions suggest colors on the parts or you just choose what you want? I think I would get seriously hung up on what colors to use. I have noticed that you always use Red for The Valve Hand Control Wheels (I guess that's what they are called).
 

neptune

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G'day Jim, just had a quick look through your build but will go back through and digest it more, its a long time since I built a plastic model and this one is entirely different, much much more advanced than anything I had built, absolutely fabulous build, so intricate and well done on your part, I know I'm going to enjoy following,

best regards John.
 

Jim Lauser

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Hi Donnie
The kit came with two instruction guides. I have already posted pages showing the assembly of the diesel motor. That's the assembly manual. Also, the kit comes with a suggested painting guide, which references paint colors from a number of suppliers, including Mr. Hobby, Vallejo, Humbrol, and Tamiya. If you look all through the pics, you will also see some Valve Control Wheels painted Black and some painted Green. I have attached a copy of the painting guide for the Central Control Room which shows two colors of valves. The numerical references in the little boxes refer to a paint table provided in the paint guide.
Hi Neptune
Thanks. After suffering through a number of wooden ships, and the resulting sawdust, I decided to switch gears because I saw the model of the Bismarck. If you look at the forum listings, you will see my Bismarck build and also my Missouri build. All of my plastic builds come from Trumpeter; the kits are made in China. I don't know where the kits are engineered, but the moldings are extremely clean, virtually no flash.
 

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GaryM

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These are unique models that far exceed the ones I grew up with as a kid. The next stage I saw was Heller models in plastic and they were great, but photo etched parts and better casting detail have revolutionized plastic kits. They have also become more challenging and worthy of the extra time spent to assemble them.
 
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