Bluenose 1/72 POF

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when trying to get smooth and weathered/scrubbed decks I finish with a sharp ended steel tool, like the end of a one foot ruler, and scrape along the grain direction with the tool held nearly perpendicular to the surface. works a treat.
Thank you for sharing your technique Chris.
I forgot to mention, I use an xacto blade (square end chisel type), and drag it across the wood, in the direction of the grain, to remove some of the top layer of stain. Then I sand and use steel wool. If you don’t scrape first, the sandpaper gets clogged fast! ;)
 

Heinrich

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The base looks lovely Dean! Now waiting for those pedestals ...
 
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Old memories, Dean: jigsaws. You use musclepower with files and knives!
Regards, Peter
A jig saw can’t make the tight curves, and will most likely chip the edges due to laminations, since it’s plywood.
A scroll saw is the best to use for this.
But I decided to drill some holes and use a coping saw, to remove the larger sections. Then I just carved and filed by hand mostly.
I find it relaxing to work by hand. ;)
 
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Thanks Rich.
The base edge is done with a router. That will be painted black. The planked boards were filed flush with the edges, and will be hand sanded to knock off any sharp edges.
The pedestal ends will be cut with a scroll saw and then pieces added at the feet and then sanded and painted black. And of course the planked wood top will be stained and clear coated. So a lot of work ahead of me. ;)
Very nic34e
Right side is sanded and shaped on one end…long way to go!
View attachment 242160View attachment 242161View attachment 242162
With some Font thinking, the stand as cut can be seen as a W for Witch in the Wind. Very clever. Rich
 
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