Bluenose Old Photos, Books, and resources from the past

Heinrich

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@PT-2 These are not just your own thoughts Rich. Part-reason for my sampan build is to tell people of a generation that is in the throes of disappearing. When this finally happens (not if, but when) a language will be lost, special "saltwater" songs, music and poetry will be lost and with it will disappear a nautical heritage that has been part of China for at least 3500 years. But we pride ourselves on "making progress" ....
 
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@PT-2 That is a very important addition Rich. This is what makes History so fascinating to me. For sure, there are those events in history we would rather not talk about, but we can't ignore them - they are after all, History! :) Throughout her illustrious career, the emphasis has rightly fallen on BN's achievements as a racing vessel and fishing schooner, but as this book details her last years, is also of vital importance., The fact that the story of the last years does not rival the heights of the great years in our perception, does not make it any less important.

The sight of two of South Africa's three Daphne-class submarines, being hacked into oblivion and reduced to scrap metal was certainly not what the imaginary script writers in the minds of those who had a connection to them, had in mind. Yet, that is what happened and as such it should be recorded as history. Maybe, just maybe, someone can learn something from that in future.
As a postscript after reading the last book, World War II Adventures of Canada's Bluenose, I would say that the title and the contents of the book are largely disjointed. Instead of bringing forth the Bluenose in very much detail, the authors primarily write about themselves, their wives, how they were investing their time an money in making money by various means, set against the backdrop of local Cuban/Havana personalities and places. It is more of a story of what they did to make money and only slightly bringing the shipments to the front between the short hauls around the West Indies ports and Florida. A disappointing read for purposes of knowing more about Bluenose. Even her final demise was written in lack of knowledge, the author's speculations, and contrary to the more detailed description of the grounding, breaking up, and final loss of the Bluenose which I have previously posted. I would only SUGGEST this book to an dedicated historian of all things Bluenose, her owners and captains. There are only two or three photos of th decks of Bluenose with her cargos being loaded, and none of her in her fishing/sailing days that are not otherwise found. Just my reaction after completing the book which will now be a dust catches on my shelves. Rich
 
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As a postscript after reading the last book, World War II Adventures of Canada's Bluenose, I would say that the title and the contents of the book are largely disjointed. Instead of bringing forth the Bluenose in very much detail, the authors primarily write about themselves, their wives, how they were investing their time an money in making money by various means, set against the backdrop of local Cuban/Havana personalities and places. It is more of a story of what they did to make money and only slightly bringing the shipments to the front between the short hauls around the West Indies ports and Florida. A disappointing read for purposes of knowing more about Bluenose. Even her final demise was written in lack of knowledge, the author's speculations, and contrary to the more detailed description of the grounding, breaking up, and final loss of the Bluenose which I have previously posted. I would only SUGGEST this book to an dedicated historian of all things Bluenose, her owners and captains. There are only two or three photos of th decks of Bluenose with her cargos being loaded, and none of her in her fishing/sailing days that are not otherwise found. Just my reaction after completing the book which will now be a dust catches on my shelves. Rich
Thanxs Rich, for this book review. Saves the necessary time to invest in it.
Regards, Peter
 
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Thanxs Rich, for this book review. Saves the necessary time to invest in it.
Regards, Peter
Here is a YouTube video well showing ship construction in the yard and particularly the framing and planking.
<iframe src="https://archive.org/embed/ghostsofcapehorn" width="640" height="480" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="true" mozallowfullscreen="true" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 
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Here is a YouTube video well showing ship construction in the yard and particularly the framing and planking.
<iframe src="https://archive.org/embed/ghostsofcapehorn" width="640" height="480" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="true" mozallowfullscreen="true" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Hi Rich,
The link in your 1e post is working on my iPad. You have to click twice, because it needs some time to load the background data. Also by the other links.
A nice movie with the old fashion muscle power!
Regards, Peter
 
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Hi Rich,
The link in your 1e post is working on my iPad. You have to click twice, because it needs some time to load the background data. Also by the other links.
A nice movie with the old fashion muscle power!
Regards, Peter
I am glad that you could open and watch it. I was concerned as it was not opening on my link but only in a "back door" hunt and grab. I still look for the scantlings and templates that guided the frame work in roughing them out for setting before final fairing. Rich
 
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I am glad that you could open and watch it. I was concerned as it was not opening on my link but only in a "back door" hunt and grab. I still look for the scantlings and templates that guided the frame work in roughing them out for setting before final fairing. Rich
Not from the past and not a schooner but a very famous pilot boat during a race with onboard action of sail handling as well as rigging that directly relate to the BN schooner in your build for a dynamic sense of sailing a gaff rigged vessel.
Rich
 
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Not from the past and not a schooner but a very famous pilot boat during a race with onboard action of sail handling as well as rigging that directly relate to the BN schooner in your build for a dynamic sense of sailing a gaff rigged vessel.
Rich
Well that was a bust!!! Try Googling:
Jolie Brise Sailing Aboard 2018 Pilot Cutter Review.
That is where I saw this when looking for:
Jolie Brise - the boat chat changed Tom Cunliffe's life. another excellent ride aboard and explanation of the pilot boat.
Sorry about some many of my botched attempts to take you aboard.
Rich
 
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Well that was a bust!!! Try Googling:
Jolie Brise Sailing Aboard 2018 Pilot Cutter Review.
That is where I saw this when looking for:
Jolie Brise - the boat chat changed Tom Cunliffe's life. another excellent ride aboard and explanation of the pilot boat.
Sorry about some many of my botched attempts to take you aboard.
Rich
Looking at construction/reconstruction, not of a schooner or Bluenose, is a fascinating rebuild of a Hereshof racer which ended up being able to be raced either in gaff or mutton leg configuration. Hopefully this video will come up in better form than my more recent attempts. The care for detail both in the research and carpentry I think are related to the demands of the YQ BN.
Rich (PT-2)
 
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Looking at construction/reconstruction, not of a schooner or Bluenose, is a fascinating rebuild of a Hereshof racer which ended up being able to be raced either in gaff or mutton leg configuration. Hopefully this video will come up in better form than my more recent attempts. The care for detail both in the research and carpentry I think are related to the demands of the YQ BN.
Rich (PT-2)
While impatiently awaiting, but that does not speed up delivery from Australia, line for my standing rigging, shrouds/ratlines, etc. , . I have obviously been surfing the internet to keep my mind occupied looking for details. This video on the "golden days of Glouchester schooner fishing, is with only a bit of background historical accuracy seen as a somewhat biased presentation lauding Ben Pine and his schooners. As a Freemason I immediately picked up on the statement that Angus Walters together with the other committee members who commissioned Bluenose, was a Mason. That launching was 1921 but Walters was not accepted and received his three Masonic degrees in Unity Lodge No, 4 of Lunenberg, between 4 November 1930 to 6 January 1931. Also is the presentation of "friendship" between Ben Pine and Walters while there was very deep animosity. Still the video has views of the schooners and rigging of interest to our YQ and other Bluenose builders.
Rich (PT-2)
 
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While impatiently awaiting, but that does not speed up delivery from Australia, line for my standing rigging, shrouds/ratlines, etc. , . I have obviously been surfing the internet to keep my mind occupied looking for details. This video on the "golden days of Glouchester schooner fishing, is with only a bit of background historical accuracy seen as a somewhat biased presentation lauding Ben Pine and his schooners. As a Freemason I immediately picked up on the statement that Angus Walters together with the other committee members who commissioned Bluenose, was a Mason. That launching was 1921 but Walters was not accepted and received his three Masonic degrees in Unity Lodge No, 4 of Lunenberg, between 4 November 1930 to 6 January 1931. Also is the presentation of "friendship" between Ben Pine and Walters while there was very deep animosity. Still the video has views of the schooners and rigging of interest to our YQ and other Bluenose builders.
Rich (PT-2)
So what was the history of fishing . . . cod fishing that drove all of these vessles? Here you go with a history lesson amplified by scores of old photos.
Rich
 
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BL2.jpg

Bluenose II


58 years ago today (July 24th), Bluenose II was launched at the Smith and Rhuland Shipyard in Lunenburg — the same place her namesake was built and launched.

In 1950 — four years after Bluenose sank, and 13 years before the launch of Bluenose II — an article in Maclean's Magazine read:

"But Lunenburg is where all Canada pictures Bluenose. That is where her memorial will stand someday... A marble likeness of just a portion of her stern say with its beautiful fashion piece and the gold letters of her name would look good out Rouses Brook way overlooking the harbor. Or maybe her wheel and a bit of her deck with Long Albert down to leeward on one bony knee as he used to kneel steering her by the luff of her towering canvas. Or the little skipper himself with the after end of her 80-foot main boom slatting over as he jibed her. Lunenburg is in the mood for a memorial. A beautiful mood when one thinks about it. A whole county tearful with grief for a vessel."

At the time of writing this, the author could not have imagined that the ultimate memorial would be constructed — a replica of Bluenose. Built under the guidance of William J. Roué and Capt. Angus Walters, Bluenose II was constructed by many of the same builders who worked on the original Bluenose.

The project was financed by Oland Brewery to advertise their products, while also promoting Nova Scotia's maritime heritage and tourism. The Oland family gifted the vessel to the Government of Nova Scotia in 1971 for $1, paid in ten dimes.

Today, Bluenose II serves as Nova Scotia's sailing ambassador, a piece of living history and a monument to our maritime heritage.
https://bluenose.novascotia.ca/history

Read the full Maclean's article here: https://archive.macleans.ca/.../the-tragedy-of-the-bluenose

Photo: Nova Scotia Information Service Nova Scotia Archives NSIS no. 16223
 
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While impatiently awaiting, but that does not speed up delivery from Australia, line for my standing rigging, shrouds/ratlines, etc. , . I have obviously been surfing the internet to keep my mind occupied looking for details. This video on the "golden days of Glouchester schooner fishing, is with only a bit of background historical accuracy seen as a somewhat biased presentation lauding Ben Pine and his schooners. As a Freemason I immediately picked up on the statement that Angus Walters together with the other committee members who commissioned Bluenose, was a Mason. That launching was 1921 but Walters was not accepted and received his three Masonic degrees in Unity Lodge No, 4 of Lunenberg, between 4 November 1930 to 6 January 1931. Also is the presentation of "friendship" between Ben Pine and Walters while there was very deep animosity. Still the video has views of the schooners and rigging of interest to our YQ and other Bluenose builders.
Rich (PT-2)
While waiting on rope, one could start a POF Bluenose…starting with a few frames! :p
 
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You are right but I don't have space for two builds in my small room and work area. This way I will know where I can head out in the future. Rich
Here is a Grand Banks motorized fishing schooner built in 1938 with a tour and explanation. There are two interesting points: briefly the captain explains that the after deck is raised above the fore deck with the great beam so that water coming aboard forward washing aft hits the bream face and is directed outwards to the scuppers so that it does not wash over the aft and wheel area.
Secondly and of more interest is coverage of the winch and windlass starting about 18 minutes into the video with very clear views and angles of those components which are viewed from both starboard and port sides along with a view between the engine housing and engagement with the winch assembly. Worth noting carefully for those trying to build their own winch/windlass.
Not the Bluenose but worth watching even with a slow paced and seemingly rambling explanations.
Rich (PT-2)
 
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