Bluenose Old Photos, Books, and resources from the past

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Here is a Grand Banks motorized fishing schooner built in 1938 with a tour and explanation. There are two interesting points: briefly the captain explains that the after deck is raised above the fore deck with the great beam so that water coming aboard forward washing aft hits the bream face and is directed outwards to the scuppers so that it does not wash over the aft and wheel area.
Secondly and of more interest is coverage of the winch and windlass starting about 18 minutes into the video with very clear views and angles of those components which are viewed from both starboard and port sides along with a view between the engine housing and engagement with the winch assembly. Worth noting carefully for those trying to build their own winch/windlass.
Not the Bluenose but worth watching even with a slow paced and seemingly rambling explanations.
Rich (PT-2)
Although the first black screen says this video is not available, click on that and it will come up anyway. Such is technology.
Rich
 
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Here is a Grand Banks motorized fishing schooner built in 1938 with a tour and explanation. There are two interesting points: briefly the captain explains that the after deck is raised above the fore deck with the great beam so that water coming aboard forward washing aft hits the bream face and is directed outwards to the scuppers so that it does not wash over the aft and wheel area.
Secondly and of more interest is coverage of the winch and windlass starting about 18 minutes into the video with very clear views and angles of those components which are viewed from both starboard and port sides along with a view between the engine housing and engagement with the winch assembly. Worth noting carefully for those trying to build their own winch/windlass.
Not the Bluenose but worth watching even with a slow paced and seemingly rambling explanations.
Rich (PT-2)
Thanks, Rich.
Again a very interesting video on the web-side of the Bluenose100. Indeed, very interesting details and why the aft deck is raided above the for deck.
And what I found interesting, also visible on the video of the BNII, the waterways are even with the deck. And not as in the manual of YQ one top of de deck planking. That seemed logical to me, because otherwise water will remain against the higher sides of the waterways. That's another point to look at and work out.
Regards, Peter
 
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Thanks, Rich.
Again a very interesting video on the web-side of the Bluenose100. Indeed, very interesting details and why the aft deck is raided above the for deck.
And what I found interesting, also visible on the video of the BNII, the waterways are even with the deck. And not as in the manual of YQ one top of de deck planking. That seemed logical to me, because otherwise water will remain against the higher sides of the waterways. That's another point to look at and work out.
Regards, Peter
I am trying not to make comparisons of the YQ model with other kits or Bluenose herself as the kit is what it is for most builders. When I do find things that may be of specific interest though I will pass those along for consideration. There are many differences as the YQ appears to be it's own version of the racing setup and does not go into what was used in the fishing fittings. Rich
 
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I am trying not to make comparisons of the YQ model with other kits or Bluenose herself as the kit is what it is for most builders. When I do find things that may be of specific interest though I will pass those along for consideration. There are many differences as the YQ appears to be it's own version of the racing setup and does not go into what was used in the fishing fittings. Rich
Noting new in this YouTube but it does have a lot of excellent sailing movie clips and views:
Rich (PT-2)
 
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I have a question as someone embarrassingly poor on North American geography...in 1935 when BN went to the Chicago World Fair how did it get there..??
It sailed up the St. Lawrence River to the World's Fair for several months and across the Atlantic for King George's event. Just a show boat schooner in those days as the fish market was very depressed and sales of salt cod were on the bottom.
Rich
 
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so does the St Lawrence give access to the Great Lakes..?
Through Quebec and Montreal to the Great Lakes systems. but Niagra Falls is in the route and I don't know how they went around. Here is another route that I found: New York City. From the Big Apple, it's a straight shot up the Hudson to the Erie Canal. Then head west across to the Great Lakes. Boaters may visit Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary when sailing up Lake Huron and then finally returning back to Chicago. I have references in "A Race for Real Sailors" Identifying her in Toronto Harbor in Lake Erie before going to Chicago which may indicate that she took the Erie Canal route but I don't know about the depth of that canal and her draft and beam to clear any locks. In the same book Gertrud Theabaud is noted as leaving New York for Chicago where the two schooners were moored side by side. Some more research on this as you have asked for. Rich (PT-2)
 
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Through Quebec and Montreal to the Great Lakes systems. but Niagra Falls is in the route and I don't know how they went around. Here is another route that I found: New York City. From the Big Apple, it's a straight shot up the Hudson to the Erie Canal. Then head west across to the Great Lakes. Boaters may visit Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary when sailing up Lake Huron and then finally returning back to Chicago. I have references in "A Race for Real Sailors" Identifying her in Toronto Harbor in Lake Erie before going to Chicago which may indicate that she took the Erie Canal route but I don't know about the depth of that canal and her draft and beam to clear any locks. In the same book Gertrud Theabaud is noted as leaving New York for Chicago where the two schooners were moored side by side. Some more research on this as you have asked for. Rich (PT-2)
From what I just found the dimensions of the canal and locks would not accommodate either schooner so the question remains open. Rich
 
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From what I just found the dimensions of the canal and locks would not accommodate either schooner so the question remains open. Rich
Here is a long explanation with some history showing that there were available options for the two schooners:

The Eastern Great Lakes region covers 51,000 square km of land, and is home to 15 million people. This region is rich in natural resources, industry and agriculture, and forms the heartland of both Canada and the United States. The development of this region has a history that is closely tied to waterways, and the development of canals that promoted growth and prosperity. The St. Lawrence Seaway connects Western and Eastern Great Lakes to the St Lawrence River and the Gulf of Saint Lawrence. The New York State Canal and the St. Lawrence Seaway were linked by the Oswego canal and provided a shorter route for cargo via barges to New York City. The New York State (NYS) Barge Canal and the St. Lawrence Seaway provided pathways for the settlement of the Eastern Great Lakes. Lake Erie drains into Lake Ontario via the Niagara River but the river was not navigable due to the obstacles of Niagara Falls and the Niagara Escarpment. Until the 1820s ships could not travel into Lake Erie. It was not possible to engineer a bypass of Niagara Falls with a series of locks due to the 100 m high Niagara escarpment. This escarpment obstacle to Niagara River navigation was overcome in 1829 with the completion of the first of four Welland Canals with locks 40 kilometers west of the Niagara River through the glacial till and alluvium that overlays the Niagara Escarpment. This permitted ocean going ships to enter Lake Erie and to continue on to Lake Michigan, Lake Huron and Lake Superior. The Eastern Great Lake shorelines, river banks and canals are actively eroding as a consequence of high surface water levels and flooding. The settlement of millions of people into the Eastern Great Lakes via the NYS Barge Canal and St. Lawrence Seaway migration pathways have created environmental and natural resource risks and challenges. These challenges and risks include deterioration of the Fourth Welland Canal and the need to replace it with the Fifth Welland Canal, industrial and urban wastewater disposal, shoreline, river bank and canal erosion as results of high water levels, the building of structures on the shoreline banks, invasive species and flooding.

Copied from a google search. Rich (PT-2)
 
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Here is a long explanation with some history showing that there were available options for the two schooners:

The Eastern Great Lakes region covers 51,000 square km of land, and is home to 15 million people. This region is rich in natural resources, industry and agriculture, and forms the heartland of both Canada and the United States. The development of this region has a history that is closely tied to waterways, and the development of canals that promoted growth and prosperity. The St. Lawrence Seaway connects Western and Eastern Great Lakes to the St Lawrence River and the Gulf of Saint Lawrence. The New York State Canal and the St. Lawrence Seaway were linked by the Oswego canal and provided a shorter route for cargo via barges to New York City. The New York State (NYS) Barge Canal and the St. Lawrence Seaway provided pathways for the settlement of the Eastern Great Lakes. Lake Erie drains into Lake Ontario via the Niagara River but the river was not navigable due to the obstacles of Niagara Falls and the Niagara Escarpment. Until the 1820s ships could not travel into Lake Erie. It was not possible to engineer a bypass of Niagara Falls with a series of locks due to the 100 m high Niagara escarpment. This escarpment obstacle to Niagara River navigation was overcome in 1829 with the completion of the first of four Welland Canals with locks 40 kilometers west of the Niagara River through the glacial till and alluvium that overlays the Niagara Escarpment. This permitted ocean going ships to enter Lake Erie and to continue on to Lake Michigan, Lake Huron and Lake Superior. The Eastern Great Lake shorelines, river banks and canals are actively eroding as a consequence of high surface water levels and flooding. The settlement of millions of people into the Eastern Great Lakes via the NYS Barge Canal and St. Lawrence Seaway migration pathways have created environmental and natural resource risks and challenges. These challenges and risks include deterioration of the Fourth Welland Canal and the need to replace it with the Fifth Welland Canal, industrial and urban wastewater disposal, shoreline, river bank and canal erosion as results of high water levels, the building of structures on the shoreline banks, invasive species and flooding.

Copied from a google search. Rich (PT-2)
Here is a fairly recent photo of BN II at Lunenberg on the Bluenose 100 Captain's Log. Full press of sail here with the small indigenous people's ancient canoe with a small sale in the foreground. Port view all sails up.jpg
The full press of canvass obscures most of the rigging so for a presentation model this is a point to consider as I am sure that the group members have. Rich (PT-2)
 
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Here is a fairly recent photo of BN II at Lunenberg on the Bluenose 100 Captain's Log. Full press of sail here with the small indigenous people's ancient canoe with a small sale in the foreground. View attachment 253588
The full press of canvass obscures most of the rigging so for a presentation model this is a point to consider as I am sure that the group members have. Rich (PT-2)
Here, hopefully is a video of a half model of BN showing the best known, by the model builder, layout and contents of BN.
Peter may be interested in seeing this as an additional view to his own unique below deck YQ cut-away.
Rich (PT-2)
 
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Here, hopefully is a video of a half model of BN showing the best known, by the model builder, layout and contents of BN.
Peter may be interested in seeing this as an additional view to his own unique below deck YQ cut-away.
Rich (PT-2)
Hi Rich,
You're just ahead of me!
Last night I saw the video on the Bleunose100 site. And wanted to post something. Here 2 stills:
370C4774-BB74-4608-BACD-344EF05C9EA3.png
79E51163-B277-4C34-9940-D26A02454D7A.png
A nice longitudinal section.
A lovely video of gifted modeller working there and displaying their models.
Gives some extra inspiration but also shows some things I had in mind. I hope to start with the 1st inner wall today or tomorrow and post something about that soon.
I am only tied to the main layout of the YQ kit and give it a personal touch.
Regards, Peter
 
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Hi Rich,
You're just ahead of me!
Last night I saw the video on the Bleunose100 site. And wanted to post something. Here 2 stills:
View attachment 254102
View attachment 254103
A nice longitudinal section.
A lovely video of gifted modeller working there and displaying their models.
Gives some extra inspiration but also shows some things I had in mind. I hope to start with the 1st inner wall today or tomorrow and post something about that soon.
I am only tied to the main layout of the YQ kit and give it a personal touch.
Regards, Peter
Wow! That is so cool! That would be fun at a large scale as shown.
 
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After taking some of the packaged wood cut parts (decking mainly) and looking into the instruction book more carefully with the pictures I see some things presented or different than in Bluenose from the old photos and Bluenose II from the book, as well as those in the MS2130 that match some of both of those, I have typed up another listing in an Excel page saved as pdf with I offer here for consideration. The main point is that builders of the YQ kite as it is provided can end with a very nice schooner model that happens to have the name Bluenose associated. Only those focusing upon ending with a model including as much as they desire of the original (using photos and other resources) or Bluenose II which has it's own differences, will have to resolve the opportunities as they desire. Here are a few visual items noticed: You may have to take in intermediate step to open it for viewing, maybe not. Enjoy your Bluenose schooner build. Rich (PT-2)
This is great. I plan on making the BN as accurate as I can do, given the information available. Thanks rich.
 
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Our porch had a welcome home box for me from the shipboard crew of BN II's recommended acquisition which I found an excellent used copy for $35.00 USD.
View attachment 219864View attachment 219864
From the detailed questions that I was asking and what they could provide their strong recommendation was to obtain this book. It is 313 pages of historical information, lofting draughts, and old photos; before beginning with very detailed drawings and explanation of everything that goes into a schooner up until the last page 683, with concluding acknowledgments and index. I cannot begin to present all that is available to a serious and detailed student and model builder of schooners and Bluenose. An example of a random page is
View attachment 219867
My point of hesitation at this initial scan of the book is how to coordinate all of the details for my own BN work. I would have liked to have had this resource sooner, before I started working on the kit as it has information and drawings related to the very start of construction. Highly recommended for your consideration. It will keep my mind working every night and all night long in preparation for the following day's work. Rich (PT-2)
Excelent reference. I use it all the time.
 
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Excelent reference. I use it all the time.
The main takeaway from Chapelle's book is that the specifications for BN by Roue mostly state to provide rigging and fittings as typical for a schooner of the BN 143 ft size. Details of the bowsprit rigging are very good and can be compared with some of the old photos of the same area as well as the windlass/capstan and gasoline engine that powered those. Another reference book that you may want to obtain is A Spirit Deep Within Naval Architect W.J. Roue, written by his daughter Joan E. Roue. as it contains his original BN design and materials specifications. I became hooked in researching BN and have acquired several books between which I bounce back and forth to find a particular item. The weakest element in by own BN build from MS2103 is that of rigging for which even the best plans that I have/found are still lacking in some details and confusing between different details and references as to where some lines are lead and belayed. Rich (PT-2)
 
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The main takeaway from Chapelle's book is that the specifications for BN by Roue mostly state to provide rigging and fittings as typical for a schooner of the BN 143 ft size. Details of the bowsprit rigging are very good and can be compared with some of the old photos of the same area as well as the windlass/capstan and gasoline engine that powered those. Another reference book that you may want to obtain is A Spirit Deep Within Naval Architect W.J. Roue, written by his daughter Joan E. Roue. as it contains his original BN design and materials specifications. I became hooked in researching BN and have acquired several books between which I bounce back and forth to find a particular item. The weakest element in by own BN build from MS2103 is that of rigging for which even the best plans that I have/found are still lacking in some details and confusing between different details and references as to where some lines are lead and belayed. Rich (PT-2)
@RDN1954 posted an old photo in his #644 of Sept. 12, 19321 which very clearly shows the Clutter of lines on top of the deck that were created in the rushed process of sailing . . . tacking, gybing, and resetting the sheets for best draw under changing wind directions on a given course. Not the neat and tidy model style or what we assume to be neatly hanked coils 716CC11E-321D-48E7-A5AD-0E1E27813560.jpegon pins in port (that is also disproven by other older photos in this thread in the first few postings.
 
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@RDN1954 posted an old photo in his #644 of Sept. 12, 19321 which very clearly shows the Clutter of lines on top of the deck that were created in the rushed process of sailing . . . tacking, gybing, and resetting the sheets for best draw under changing wind directions on a given course. Not the neat and tidy model style or what we assume to be neatly hanked coils View attachment 255896on pins in port (that is also disproven by other older photos in this thread in the first few postings.
 
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