HMS Druid P.O.F. - Unicorn Models by Donnie

Donnie

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Thank you Dave and others for the support.

I removed ALL the spacers and the reason is, is demonstrated below. The Frames (Ribs) have REFERENCE marks on them as to where the Beams go. I had "covered the marks - lettering" with the spacers and therefore did not know where the reference marks were.

The arrows are pointing to the reference marks and these are on EACH SIDE of the Frame. In this case, they are (stamped on the frame) D2D and D2C near the BOW of the ship.
In this case, the spacers will be re installed right BELOW these two marks. Other wise, when you look into the ship, you will see those 'ugly' spacers instead of a nice clean DECK.

frame-ref-marks.jpg
 

Donnie

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This now demonstrates what should be the proper location of the spacers - the Reference Marks for the BEAMS should be visible for LATER. There are LINE MARKS on the Frames (Ribs). The horizontal lines are used for placement of the BEAMS that go from Port to Starboard. There is also numbering of the location of the Beams such as D2D, D2E, and so forth. They are inscribed right below the horizontal tick marks.

spacers-01.jpg
 

Donnie

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I have revised all the lower spacers placement and now moving on to the next row that is above this row. Before I do this, I wanted to see how the BEAMS were going to fit between the REFERENCE lines. There is about a .5mm gap on each side (1mm total) so far with the first two BEAMS.

Now, the BEAMS will sit on a batten that is fixed from bow to stern on the inside. However, I wish for my BEAMS to also touch the sides of the frames for a more accurate look and representation rather than just the BEAMS sitting on the battens.

Given the fact that I am not ready to install the BEAMS, I made some FALSE BEAMS and tack glued them in place. As the next layer of spacers is installed, the spacers will create a more solid and structured SHAPE. Therefore, with the FALSE BEAMS tight up against the frames (ribs) and with the spacers continually be installed, I can then remove the FALSE BEAMS, and "the frame" from bow to stern will stay IN TACT ready for the installation of the real BEAMS.

You will see now that the spacers are BELOW the BEAMS and the REFERENCE LINES are not covered up.

spacers-04.jpg
 

Donnie

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I have not been as active on this project as I was at the beginning and several reasons are accountable for that. Sometimes life gets in the way of enjoying what we want to do and then again I have lost my "settled spirit" to settle down to work on it. It seems that interruptions and 'things on the mind' are intruding on me more and more each day. New work and office projects drains me, wife's needs, dog interruptions, and things and life in general.

I had to remove ALL the spacers and start again and finally got all those remounted. I also have sanded in the interior and exterior of the hull. Sadly to say that I am starting to "not" like this ship I am building and I hope that my newfound frustrations will not keep anyone else from this kit.

I am starting to see that the "order" of building this ship just does not make any sense. The steps to build the hull seem to be out of order.

The first thing is this: The (author) of the kit wants you to plank up most of the hull BEFORE you install the lower beams and the batten that the beams rest on.
How can you install battens inside the hull and beams with the outside planking being right there in the way ??? Just does not make any sense as the order in the way this kit manual suggests and probably on some other things as well.

With the type of person that I am (I always follow instructions to a "T" - well, this is driving me crazy) as I am going to have to just take matters into my own hands and just build the thing and hope I get it right as the instructions just seem non-logical step by step manner. Needless to say, I am very frustrated at this point.

When I walk into my shop, I get this feeling of - do I really want to continue with this thing?
 
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Hi Donnie,
I give your post a like, but it is not likable what you wrote. But is understandable. I hope you get some inspiration to go on with this build on your own way.
Go through the instructions, throw away the back of the book and put the pages in the order you think is best for you. And when it is still irritating you ..... modelbuilding must by a pleasure.
So, good luck to make the right decision.
Regards, Peter
 

Dave Stevens (Lumberyard)

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Needless to say, I am very frustrated at this point


which brings up the Zen of model building.

i hear over and over comments on the "plans" and how accurate or inaccurate they are, i hear about "instructions" and how they are so vague.

one day i thought many of the builders of the original ship did not have detailed construction plans or instructions and yet they built ships from the keel up.
i build from scratch so i never used instructions so instructions are not all that important, ship building kit or scratch is an exercise in logic.

finding the time

this requires going into your work space and dedicating an allotted amount of time to model building.
i found building a model piece by piece all the time, spending maybe 10 to 15 minutes between everything else. like glue up a frame and go make dinner, while that is cooking set up another frame..

my work space looks like this and i might be drawing on one computer, answering emails on another and between all that swing over and glue more frame pieces together. There is never any model building time set aside it all flows together.

pre planning

that is the one major point, i can not even tell you how many times i take things apart and try again. Harold Hahn once told me you have to know how to build the model as well as how to take it apart over and over again.

model building

it is not starting a project from square one and work until you finish it. Model building is a process of teaching yourself something. Then once you work out the problems pass it on to other builders.


my spot.jpg
 

Jimsky

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Hello Donnie,

As much as we wanted you to continue with this project, it most likely you have to put it aside. Or, perhaps build deck furniture or cannons for this kit. Change from the frames routines might be a time burden and monotonous.
Another option, get yourself rest from modeling. :)
 

Maarten

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Hi Donnie,

Fully agree with Steve here. Maybe you need to approach this project as a box of materials to build a nice ship model.
Leave the manual for what it is and create your own building sequence.
I actually never use the manual provided with the kit and yes sometimes you have to think over and over again the process of the part you are building before you create the first dust.

I am certain this will give you new spirit to go on with this build.
You can certainly do it looking at your recent project.
 
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Dear friend
I do not pretend to give you advice and way, you are much more experienced than me Just saying that, this hobby comes from an inner passion!
We create the way we walk in life in general and in building models in particular. So it seems to me that the way to deal with the real difficulty and frustrations you are experiencing, will be through deciding on your conscientious direction.
Dear friend I do not pretend to give you advice and way, you are much more experienced than me Just saying that, this hobby comes from an inner passion! We create the way we walk in life in general and in building models in particular. So it seems to me that the way to deal with the real difficulty and frustrations you are experiencing, will be through deciding on your conscientious direction. The decision and the way you take, are unjudgeable of right or wrong and the like, because they are your specialty and reflect your fingerprint as a creator and artist. Good luck along the way, in creating and dealing with the difficulties (by the way, it is the coping that creates what sets us apart from the others for the better).
Good luck along the way, in creating and dealing with the difficulties (by the way, it is the coping that creates what sets us apart from the others for the better)
 
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Needless to say, I am very frustrated at this point


which brings up the Zen of model building.

i hear over and over comments on the "plans" and how accurate or inaccurate they are, i hear about "instructions" and how they are so vague.

one day i thought many of the builders of the original ship did not have detailed construction plans or instructions and yet they built ships from the keel up.
i build from scratch so i never used instructions so instructions are not all that important, ship building kit or scratch is an exercise in logic.

finding the time

this requires going into your work space and dedicating an allotted amount of time to model building.
i found building a model piece by piece all the time, spending maybe 10 to 15 minutes between everything else. like glue up a frame and go make dinner, while that is cooking set up another frame..

my work space looks like this and i might be drawing on one computer, answering emails on another and between all that swing over and glue more frame pieces together. There is never any model building time set aside it all flows together.

pre planning

that is the one major point, i can not even tell you how many times i take things apart and try again. Harold Hahn once told me you have to know how to build the model as well as how to take it apart over and over again.

model building

it is not starting a project from square one and work until you finish it. Model building is a process of teaching yourself something. Then once you work out the problems pass it on to other builders.


View attachment 227379

Hi Donnie,

I fully agree with Dave. Your engaging start and absolutely great finishes have me buying the kit myself. The work on Le Coureur have so far prevented it from starting. I'm extremely sorry to hear about your frustration, but aren't we all in this situation? On my Coureur I had to cut out the outer planking in the whole bow area, because it did not fit at all the interlocking of the frames.

Then I had to put the whole thing aside and spent some time with my 0 gauge railroad. But now it's my turn again.

I wish you all the courage and strength to bring back the joy to continue.

Regards

Adi
 
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Don't give up Donnie!
You have started so beautifully and accurately, it would be a real shame to throw it all away now.
I also get frustrated sometimes when I file the ribs of my Coureur and one breaks off again. And in general, filing for hours is boring me. Then I take a break for a few days, play around with something else (like Adi with 0 gauge tin train for example ;-) ) and then start again. This takes a long time, but what the heck.
Christian
 

Donnie

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I have to write a response now -
I am delighted that I have received positive feedback from all of you - that alone is very encouraging - thank you all !!!

I think my problem is being overloaded by various other things going on and when trying to settle (my mind) in my shop - I have too much going on in my mind - I need to slow down and get back to normality again.

Ever since I hurt my spine (HA - when I was sanding the frames) it really took a lot of spirit out of me. I now approach my shop with apprehension that I will hurt myself again. Remember, I missed a whole month of work and was in terrible pain and agony due to a disk that got twisted and came out of alignment.

So, my Chiropractor just told me to work a little at a time and take a lot of breaks.

Thanks again to all of you

Donnie
 

Donnie

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My apologies for my unnecessary whining - just get busted from time to time. I had a few minutes after getting home to work on starting the first frames that start the curvature of the BOW. These pieces will go in at an angle.
I have removed the false beams for now.


HKF-10.jpg


HKF-11.jpg


HKF-12.jpg


HKF-13.jpg


HKF-14.jpg
 
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I have to write a response now -
I am delighted that I have received positive feedback from all of you - that alone is very encouraging - thank you all !!!

I think my problem is being overloaded by various other things going on and when trying to settle (my mind) in my shop - I have too much going on in my mind - I need to slow down and get back to normality again.

Ever since I hurt my spine (HA - when I was sanding the frames) it really took a lot of spirit out of me. I now approach my shop with apprehension that I will hurt myself again. Remember, I missed a whole month of work and was in terrible pain and agony due to a disk that got twisted and came out of alignment.

So, my Chiropractor just told me to work a little at a time and take a lot of breaks.

Thanks again to all of you

Donnie
Donnie, I feel for you. I've had three back operations to fix my spine, if you can call it fixed. The last was a fusion of L4-5 and I still live with daily pain, which I'll have to live with for many years to come and no more sailing. Talk about a lot on my mind. I have to ware a brace when I'm sitting at my work bench and I hate to drop anything. Sometimes my grabbers just don't reach. Haha
What I'm trying to say is you do wonderful work and sometimes if the pain gets you down, it's not the project. I asked my doctor why my back failed since I was a fairly athletic guy before this happened to me. He said it could have happened any time, doing any everyday activity. I'm pulling for you.
It would be a sad day to loose your talent and exceptional corporate knowledge.
 

Donnie

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Thank you all for the words of encouragement. It does motivate me to get back to work. So, here are the latest as I start to close in the Bow. The last pictures are the bow pieces that will finally close up the bow.

HKF-15.jpg







HKF-18.jpgHKF-19.jpg

HKF-20.jpg

HKF-21.jpg
 
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