La Belle 1/36 - Plan by Jean Boudriot / myself

Uwek

Admin
Staff member
Administrative
Blandford Group Build
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
9,833
Points
728

Location
Vienna, Austria
Fabulous work Oliver Thumbsup I am only about two years away from this stage:rolleyes:ROTFROTF

Kind Regards

Nigel
Hallo Nigel,
you have to make only "some" more frames - the work with big size vessels is "in principle" the same, only more often ROTF
Oliver, it is looking very good - step by step she is getting a ship
 

Olivers Historic Shipyard

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2018
Messages
245
Points
243

Location
Munich
Thanks, my friends.
The main reason to build the La Belle was that she has all what a big ship has as well. Its a good ship to train the doing because everything is more "easier" to build. The bigger ships has more parts and the complexity is much bigger in this parts. But don´t underestimate the La Belle. I think the La Belle has everything to loose the game, to show you pain and frustration. Its depend from the modeller, his skill and his ambition. Who has a fighter inside, who never give up, will defeat. For others the little sweet innocent La Belle will show the limit in modelling.
 
Last edited:

Olivers Historic Shipyard

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2018
Messages
245
Points
243

Location
Munich
Inferno days !!! One Weekend only for fit the last hawse piece, one little deadwood and sanding only on one side. Unfortunatly the CAD Drawing doesent helps for the last piece. All the tolerances frome the first five hawse pieces add up at this point. It´s nescessary to fit in the last piece by hand equal like the little deadwood. For this work it needs a lot of patience.

72950227_798832473868275_3075637874645794816_o.jpg73495118_798832593868263_5079131232218906624_o.jpg73460539_798832700534919_5291258219564367872_o.jpg73533140_798832733868249_8099086792902311936_o.jpg74666175_798832367201619_3383862835388874752_o.jpg73090732_798832770534912_6893684885337145344_o.jpg
 

Olivers Historic Shipyard

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2018
Messages
245
Points
243

Location
Munich
Thank you, my friends. With a puzzle like this you learn a lot. Patience is the first :).

@NMBROOK
Congrats to your promotion as a mod. You are the right person for this job.
I need to know one detail from you Saint Phillipe. We both have the same epoche of building with a gap of 10 years.
Do you have on your ship the hawse holes covered with a sheet metal ? It was state of the art at the final of the 17. century
in french shipbuilding ? Maybe @G. DELACROIX knows the anwer ?

1571633514501.png
 

NMBROOK

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jul 15, 2013
Messages
710
Points
393

Location
Yorkshire England
Thankyou Oliver:)Yes Saint Philippe's hawse holes were lined with sheet lead.I would guess that this was common practice however I am not sure this extended onto the bolster as shown in your picture (extremely nice model by the way).This is the first time I have seen it like this.My understanding is that the sheet lead was beaten around the holes forming a return flange on each side,but what does happen where the bolster meets the hole?It maybe that your picture shows the correct detail.
One thing to watch regarding hawse holes,people quite often make the mistake of cutting these tangential to the hull curve.On many French ships they run parallel to the vessel's centreline including Saint Philippe.

Kind Regards

Nigel
 

Olivers Historic Shipyard

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2018
Messages
245
Points
243

Location
Munich
@NMBROOK
Thank you for the informations. I did a reasearch in my libary. Unfortunatly i have a lot of publications of english ships. My french knowledge is poor.
I find a interesting information in the book from Wolfram Mondfeld.

1571682437989.png

He explanin very well how does it work. it combine with the 74-gun from JB and my plan from the La Belle. Mondfeld´s information is a generally information. He doesn´t explain a specific techique from specific navy.
If we add up what we know, this sheet here isn´t correct because he has a sharp edge. The black wood needs a big radius for the rope. This is what i know from various books and models. My plan from the La Belle doesn´t shows this detail exactly, the planset from the BHR unfortunatly neither. The 74 Gun Book shows only a flange who is fixed with nails. Or maybe i missed the detailed info in the book.....

1571682654579.png
 

NMBROOK

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jul 15, 2013
Messages
710
Points
393

Location
Yorkshire England
Hi Oliver
I think Mondfelds outer flange looks very plausible.His section is illustrating the hole angles downwards on both sides in relation to the waterline which makes a lot of sense as this is the path of the rope.If the lead did run on to the bolster it would have to be beaten to follow the large radius on the bolster.The main idea of the lead is to protect the hawse timbers from water

Kind Regards

Nigel
 

Olivers Historic Shipyard

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2018
Messages
245
Points
243

Location
Munich
Hi Nigel,

I will do on the bolster a big radius. The hawsehole will get a sheet with a flange. The hole in my drawings are a straight hole. If i compare it with Mondfeld it doesnt fits. I think the plan shows only that it will be a hole. The technical implementation is in responsability of the shipyard. You and I :)

Now a little bit routine.
How do you get an osteoarthritis ? It´s very simple. You try to build the hawesframes from a POF-Project. Holy cow, what a mess. Sanding this frames are very ornate. I put the last filling piece from the right side in the hull and sand it. The last gaps i will remove when i smooth the surface the last time. Now the other side..

74506091_800653790352810_7010579446864281600_o.jpg

75424682_800653700352819_9186408019297042432_o.jpg

72812203_800653860352803_2789453672453505024_o.jpg

73133584_800653937019462_6630717262007369728_o.jpg

72920154_800654090352780_8651836186110722048_o.jpg

73342428_800653480352841_6413874323261489152_o.jpg
 
Top