Ratliner tool

Donnie

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You know after giving this some thought. It could be possible to use if you knew the distance from the top of the shroud to the deadeyes and then if you knew the spacing of the deadeyes. If you notice that as the distance gets longer, of course, the ratline spacing gets wider and conversely, and if you knew the distance, then it might be probable that all the measurements might work out. I see there are slots/bumps at the top that you can start. They are using a slot that is far-right, then they have a slot that is just aft of that then same arrangement on the other side.
I guess my point is that if you already have this tool, then give it a try. Another thing to point out that in reality, when you are rigging your first lower shrouds you do NOT want to install your upper mast PAST the TOPS. This way, you have a stub (for lack of better terms) to hang your completed shroud onto.
On my first large ship, my mast was fully built and I had to feed each shroud line in between the tops and it was tough going. Other than that, if I did not have this tool, I probably would not invest in it. I guess this is a softer answer.
 

Jay

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You know after giving this some thought. It could be possible to use if you knew the distance from the top of the shroud to the deadeyes and then if you knew the spacing of the deadeyes. If you notice that as the distance gets longer, of course, the ratline spacing gets wider and conversely, and if you knew the distance, then it might be probable that all the measurements might work out. I see there are slots/bumps at the top that you can start. They are using a slot that is far-right, then they have a slot that is just aft of that then same arrangement on the other side.
I guess my point is that if you already have this tool, then give it a try. Another thing to point out that in reality, when you are rigging your first lower shrouds you do NOT want to install your upper mast PAST the TOPS. This way, you have a stub (for lack of better terms) to hang your completed shroud onto.
On my first large ship, my mast was fully built and I had to feed each shroud line in between the tops and it was tough going. Other than that, if I did not have this tool, I probably would not invest in it. I guess this is a softer answer.
Yes, I was thinking the same thing, that you couldn’t already have the complete mast put together to use this tool.
 
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I got this tool and tried it...it is finicky in that it takes some careful measuring and setup but once you have the lines set it can actually work. The trick is to be very precise in setting up the shroud lines on the tool to match how the shrouds will lay on your model. The lines on the tool can then be pulled tight and the ratlines knotted on. The only advantage in using this tool is you can move the tool around as you knot the ratlines and you are not limited to working on the model itself. This is one of the better designed and perhaps useful of these type tools. Let me also say that I have found setting the shrouds on the model and then knotting the rat lines on the model is just as productive...there is no easy magic solution to this modeling piccadello. :)
 
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Jay

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I got this tool and tried it...it is finicky and takes some careful measuring and setup but once you have the lines set it can actually work. The trick is to be very precise in setting up the shroud lines on the tool to match how the shrouds will lay in you model. The lines on the tool can then be pulled tight and the ratlines knotted on. The only advantage in using this tool is you can move the tool around as you knot the ratlines and you are not limited to working on the model itself. This is one of the more clever and perhaps useful of these type tools. Let me also say that I have found setting the shrouds on the model and then knotting the rat lines on the model is just as productive...there is no easy magic solution to this modeling piccadello. :)
Interesting. Do you have to do the bottom masts first?
 
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I've never tried that tool, but I've tried different ways to rig and rattle shrouds and settled on doing everything on the ship after the masts are built up. I've found it's the best way to assure optimal tension and spacing because you can see how the finished product will look as you go. As with a lot of things, I think there is an X factor in terms of where your personal skills lie and what works best for you.
 
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On previous models, I found the following method was most effective.
On a piece of A4 ruled paper draw in the shrouds and ratlines to desired scale. Cut-out the result leaving a small margin all round 1/2 ins, and stick onto a piece of cardboard which is itself dimensions for a close fit between the respective channel and the underneath of the mast fighting-top'.
Simple and effective. The ratline/shroud/red-eye all-in-one 'tool' is a waste of space.
 
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I used a similar tool on a build years ago and had mixed feelings about it. On the plus side - it's portable and things are fairly well laid out for you but you do have to do it a layer at a time and building the masts in place can be a pain. Negatives - you do have to build your masts in place and, as mentioned before , tension is hard to maintain. Now days I only use it on small scale plastic models where critical acuracy is not necessary.
 

Jay

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I used a similar tool on a build years ago and had mixed feelings about it. On the plus side - it's portable and things are fairly well laid out for you but you do have to do it a layer at a time and building the masts in place can be a pain. Negatives - you do have to build your masts in place and, as mentioned before , tension is hard to maintain. Now days I only use it on small scale plastic models where critical acuracy is not necessary.
Thanks for your input Jim I appreciate it.
Like your tag line. As a former jet engine mechanic I have seen up close and personal what kind of damage a bird can do to a jet engine.
 
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So glad I saw this thread, I thought I messed up by building the mast all the way before installing rat lines, I was just going to order this tool, the black plastic one I have is a pc of junk.
i have 2 More masts to build, should I do them in steps or build them all the way up first?
 
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I went and grabbed the rat line builder I bought years ago, it’s made by Amati, 7ACB36FD-4CCD-454C-92DB-1D3EFD65B0F0.jpeg53F36080-FEF1-465A-9537-77154F86701E.jpegthe brass pins fall out, some go in deeper that others. I don’t like it. At the top don’t you need a loop to go over the mast? It‘ll be a real small hole with this. Or am I looking at it wrong.
 

Jay

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So glad I saw this thread, I thought I messed up by building the mast all the way before installing rat lines, I was just going to order this tool, the black plastic one I have is a pc of junk.
i have 2 More masts to build, should I do them in steps or build them all the way up first?
I’m just a novice but I built all my masts first. It’s easier to do the rigging when they aren’t attached to the ship. More room to work on them. Just my opinion though.
 

Kkonrath

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Thanks for your input Jim I appreciate it.
Like your tag line. As a former jet engine mechanic I have seen up close and personal what kind of damage a bird can do to a jet engine.
While not a true Jet Mech, I have been a Crew Chief for USAF A-7D and A-10A, both with large engine intakes.

I have seen a A-10A take in a small sparrow and pass out with no damage to the engine anyway...bird, not so lucky.
 
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I shelled two engines with geese in a B-52 before. Luckily we still had six more. But Iynot sure what it has to do with rat lines. I’ve tried using the cardboard with lines drawn on it trick. It did help keep them evenly spaced. I still struggle with keeping the shrouds lines up vertically. Sometimes they pinch in. I guess i made the clove hitches with too much tension.
 

Jay

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I shelled two engines with geese in a B-52 before. Luckily we still had six more. But Iynot sure what it has to do with rat lines. I’ve tried using the cardboard with lines drawn on it trick. It did help keep them evenly spaced. I still struggle with keeping the shrouds lines up vertically. Sometimes they pinch in. I guess i made the clove hitches with too much tension.
I tried the cardboard thing too. Gave it up in a New York minute. I can’t do the template thing that keeps the deadeyes lined up either.
 
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