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Ratliner tool

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May 13, 2020
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I tried the cardboard thing too. Gave it up in a New York minute. I can’t do the template thing that keeps the deadeyes lined up either.
Several people suggested using a stiff piece of wire to keep deadeyes lined up. You place the ends of the wire in the holes and make sure the bottom deadeyes are firmly seated. It worked for me better than eyeballing it, but it was a bit awkward. Maybe someone else can explain it better with better pictures. I’m just a beginner. image.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpg
 

Jay

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Several people suggested using a stiff piece of wire to keep deadeyes lined up. You place the ends of the wire in the holes and make sure the bottom deadeyes are firmly seated. It worked for me better than eyeballing it, but it was a bit awkward. Maybe someone else can explain it better with better pictures. I’m just a beginner. View attachment 171481View attachment 171482View attachment 171483

Thanks I will probably try that, nothing to lose right? Was aboard Old Ironsides when I was 13. Couldn’t stand up straight when I went below deck. That is a possibility for my 3rd build.
 
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Yep, thats the idea there @Vfordyce but it is much easier to do off the model. You can rig those all the same length by making a jig with the wire, then a drop of glue to hold the line. Then seize the deadeyes rope to the stays on the model.

As far as the rigging tool, I bought the Amati one years ago. About the best use I could find for it was a back scratcher.
 

Donnie

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This is only FYI:
Usually right above all the deadeyes is a spar (sheer pole) that runs horizontal to the Chainplates. Each Shroud is lashed to the pole. This pole is usually found on most all ships of the line. It also helps in keeping the lanyards straight and not twisting. This pole would be installed before any ratlines are done. On this image, it is the RED pole.

standing-rigging-starboard-25.jpg
 
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Aug 26, 2020
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I bought an Amati frame but did not find it particularly useful.
I have tried other techniques including building the shrouds in situ.
This is fine but it is difficult to thread the dead-eyes with a fine needle if they are very close to the hull.
An alternative was temporarily to fix the chain plate to a board with a rectangular hole just above it covering the area of the dead-eyes.
The stays can then be created using the actual chain plate positions for the lower end and a peg at the top where the crow's nest would be.
The dead-eyes can be threaded through the aforementioned hole and the ratlines comfortably added on the bench or lap.
This kept all the angles and lengths correct. The complete assembly can then be attached to the model.
A dummy chain plate could be made for building the topmast shrouds.
(Beware: the port and starboard assemblies are mirror images!)
 
Joined
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Messages
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Location
San Antonio, Texas
This is only FYI:
Usually right above all the deadeyes is a spar (sheer pole) that runs horizontal to the Chainplates. Each Shroud is lashed to the pole. This pole is usually found on most all ships of the line. It also helps in keeping the lanyards straight and not twisting. This pole would be installed before any ratlines are done. On this image, it is the RED pole.

View attachment 171524
Yes, I wish my model had that. I’ve already rigged the foremast, and I don’t think
 
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Messages
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Location
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I bought an Amati frame but did not find it particularly useful.
I have tried other techniques including building the shrouds in situ.
This is fine but it is difficult to thread the dead-eyes with a fine needle if they are very close to the hull.
An alternative was temporarily to fix the chain plate to a board with a rectangular hole just above it covering the area of the dead-eyes.
The stays can then be created using the actual chain plate positions for the lower end and a peg at the top where the crow's nest would be.
The dead-eyes can be threaded through the aforementioned hole and the ratlines comfortably added on the bench or lap.
This kept all the angles and lengths correct. The complete assembly can then be attached to the model.
A dummy chain plate could be made for building the topmast shrouds.
(Beware: the port and starboard assemblies are mirror images!)
I'm a visual person. I t would be great to see pictures of that in action.
 
Joined
Aug 26, 2020
Messages
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UK Dorset
I'm a visual person. I t would be great to see pictures of that in action.
I am not currently rigging at the moment but I have cobbled up an image of the technique I described.
I hope it conveys the principle. The grooves in the wood above the hole are not really necessary but
they help to keep the upper dead-eye still while threading it.
The device keeps the dead-eyes of the individual stays aligned
.rig jig.jpgrig jig.jpg
 
Joined
May 13, 2020
Messages
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San Antonio, Texas
I am not currently rigging at the moment but I have cobbled up an image of the technique I described.
I hope it conveys the principle. The grooves in the wood above the hole are not really necessary but
they help to keep the upper dead-eye still while threading it.
The device keeps the dead-eyes of the individual stays aligned
.View attachment 175693View attachment 175693
Thanks!
 
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May 13, 2020
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Location
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Ratlines and deadeyes are starting to come easier now on my second mast. I know most of the mistakes I made on the foremast and have discovered some workarounds. The biggest thing I've learned is perseverance. When I first started on the Connie, I made a mistake and left it there. I was too impatient, looking at all I had left to do to fix it, I think. Now I find it more expedient to tear it out, cut it off, or untie the thread and start over. There's a Canadian DYI guy named Holmes who says, "Get it right!" I think he overheard my dad when he used to tell me, "Do it right the first time. Then you won't have to do it again."
1598794058216.png
 
Joined
Aug 26, 2020
Messages
61
Points
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Location
UK Dorset
This is only FYI:
Usually right above all the deadeyes is a spar (sheer pole) that runs horizontal to the Chainplates. Each Shroud is lashed to the pole. This pole is usually found on most all ships of the line. It also helps in keeping the lanyards straight and not twisting. This pole would be installed before any ratlines are done. On this image, it is the RED pole.

View attachment 171524
I gather (from elsewhere in this site?) that sheer poles would not be appropriate on my Mary Rose.
I have compromised. I used slightly thicker thread for the first ratline above the deadeyes.
before pulling the clove hitches really tight I gripped the shroud just below it and twisted to get the deadeyes reasonably straight.
I then applied glue to the knots and ratline cord. It looks like a ratline but behaves as a sheer pole.
Sheer pole.jpg
 
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