Charles Royal Yacht, 1674, Scale 1:64, by Woody Joe (Japan)

Jimsky

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Joe, your comments always appreciated. And you totally correct, at this size treenails are very fragile, delicate use is required. I am planning to release Part 2 of trenails saga later today\tomorrow, please stop by. Perhaps, the second method you may like better.

Happy modelling!
 

Uwek

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Joe, your comments always appreciated. And you totally correct, at this size treenails are very fragile, delicate use is required. I am planning to release Part 2 of trenails saga later today\tomorrow, please stop by. Perhaps, the second method you may like better.

Happy modelling!
THis sounds very good - The first tutorial was already very good and well explained - many thanks for sharing your knowledge and experience
 

Jimsky

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All hands on deck!
It will be unfair, if at the beginning of Part 2 (treenails) not to mention those without whom this building log is simply bored. Precisely because of your feedback and comments, the building log acquires a lively interest, for which many thanks to all of you!
@Maarten, @Nj0rdr, @zoly99sask, @Uwek, @Mike41, @BigMike @Pat71, @ron0909. @Peglegreg, @piter56 (forgive me if I missed anyone).

...and we shall begin. First of all, I inform you that a captain was appointed by the Admiralty who will henceforth follow the construction. His name is Bernie! Please respect.

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Part 2

From the time I have posted
Part 1, I have received mixed feedback. Some of you considered this a close to the realistic method, while others find treenails of this dimension too delicate to work with. All opinions have valid points and counts. In part 2, of a 'treenailing' saga, I would like to present a simplified, but a very presentable version of simulating treenails. I’ve seen this implemented on smaller scales models where bamboo/drawplates treenails would be a challenge. I used this method mostly on hulls planking, but it does work on the deck planking as well. So…without further ado, let’s begin.

What do we need for this to accomplish? A drill bit, an awl with a polished end, #2 sharp pencil\sharpener, sandpaper and Elmer’s wood filler.

  • Drill the holes for all of the treenails following the pattern shown on the plans. I recommend working in small area 2” x 2” at a time.
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  • Once drilled, sand the area smooth
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  • Use a sharp (polished) awl and gently insert (twisted) into each hole. DON’T push it too hard or you will distort the hole shape.
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  • Take a very, very sharp #2 pencil. Insert point into each hole and twist lightly. You must keep a sharp point and sharpen the pencil every ten or so holes. A battery-operated version is a great time saver. Alternatively, you can use a mechanical pencil.
  • Brush the surface with a soft brush to remove some pencil lead dust (if any).
  • Then fill each hole with Elmer's wood filler. Scrape off excess with a piece of wood or scraper. A word about the wood filler. I personally like Elmer's brand. It is drying fast, sanding smooth and stainable (if needed). Elmer's also has filler in tubes, Their premade colours can match your planking without stain!! The colours are: Mahogany, Golden Oak, Red Oak, Walnut, White, Natural and Stainable
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  • Sand it smooth to get a nice surface.
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Finishing decision is always the preference of your choice. I just wanted to let you know that it looks fantastic when covering the surface multiple coats with Linseed Oil. Just let it dry completely before applying the next coat.

Happy Treenailing!!!
 

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Mike41

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Hi Jim, your treenails look great.
Mike
 

ron0909

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Yes! Chapter 2 in the 'Book of Jim' now complete. Thank you once again for sharing your expertise. I realize that it takes a fair amount of effort to put these
tutorials together. I am grateful for your insight and everyone else that goes the extra distance to help this site and this hobby prosper.

Ron
 

Jimsky

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Yes! Chapter 2 in the 'Book of Jim' now complete
@ron0909 Thank you for the kind of words! "Book of Jim" sounds funny :) I am very grateful and extremely happy to be part of our forum. Unlike other forums, our forum is aimed to help beginners, and if there any opportunity to help, I will do it with great pleasure.
 

ron0909

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Unlike other forums, our forum is aimed to help beginners, and if there any opportunity to help, I will do it with great pleasure.
I was a commercial electrician for many years and one of the best things about my job was passing on what I knew to the younger guys / apprentices. When I was learning my trade, it was like pulling teeth to get some guys to show you how to do something as if their trade secrets were what was keeping them employed. Little did they realise that when everyone does well, the company does really well and the customers were always happy. It felt really good to see young people prosper and take pride in what they did. Thanks again for sharing what you know and that goes to everyone here! Ok..back to ship modeling :)
 

Jimsky

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Hello fellow modellers! Many thanks for visiting building log and kind comments. Today, we will be decorating Transom and Quarter gallery windows.

I managed to finish all planking and treenailing. A few coats of Linseed oil used to protect Hull planking. So, she is now ready for decoration. I would like to especially note the high quality of casting for all the decorations provided by Woody Joe in the kit. For the most part, they are ready without additional detailing. This cast metal is soft and can be shaped (if needed). Originally, the plan was to decoupage all decorations using Monalisa kit. Despite an authentic method, I found a minimal resemblance using a gilded technique. Hence, due to a relatively small scale, it was time-consuming so I decided to use gold paint instead.

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Windows glass was imitated using tiny plastic found between cheese slices. Unique pattern and thickness make them a really nice fit. Windows frames where photoetched parts and when fitted loose. I corrected this by fabricated wood frames out of Ebony.

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Woodie provides a simple moulding for the stern. I thought it would be nice to create something fancier. So, using the method described earlier in the post #35, I made my own mouldings for both: transom and stern tuck.

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How She is looking after all decoration in-place, see below.

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Be sure to check regularly. Lanterns are next.
Stay tuned...
 

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ron0909

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Jim, I can't get over the clean lines and beautiful symmetry of this model. The gold paint seems to have worked really well. I can see where the leaf would have driven anyone nuts with all of those details! Good call with the ebony window frames. They look as if they belong and really add to the ensemble. The plastic looks like there are shears behind the glass with that pattern. Can't wait to watch you build the lanterns!
Ron
 

Jimsky

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@ron0909 Thank you very much for appreciating my work. The very first photo is where the decor was covered with gold leaf. I must say, I was happy with the result. But once I moved to a gun port decorations and other smallest pieces, I quickly realize it will be too much. And yes, the plastic looks like it has shears behind, that's why I putt my eye on it. :)
 
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Jimsky

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Buon Giorno (Hello in Italian). As always, Thank you all for the kind words and attention to this build log. Back to the small shipyard, and today will talk about Lanterns.

I have some doubts that such a small vessel required three stern lanterns. The research didn’t dispel my doubts and considering that this is a royal yacht, I didn’t argue with the manufacturer and left the total numbers in-tact. Woody Joe provided three (3) cast metal lanterns. As with all cast metal parts in this kit, the lanterns were not exceptions in quality and detailing. A proper painting job will make them very nice and quite attractive.

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However, I choose a metalsmith work over the painting, as painting is not my area of expertise. The construction method wasn’t complicated, but have a number of parts you would need to solder in order. I use a butane torch and silver solder paste, it is premixed with flux and doesn’t require high temperature to melt.

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The base of the lantern is two (2) tubes (one enters the other). Then, 8 slots are cut into the base and a twisted brass wire is inserted into them, brazed and the whole structure is soldered together. To imitate a glass, I used a ball from my wife's jewellery (she still does not know about it). On top of the lantern, I use the same setup as for the base except I didn’t solder twisted wire. Instead, I made 8 cuts with jewellery saw and bent them to form a crown. The top and bottom parts were assembled using CA glue. Once completely dry, I polished lightly using a buff wheel.

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The results are shown below.....


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See you soon...
 

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Jimsky

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From the time we are born to this present moment, milestones are a part of our DNA. All the significant dates in between are the showcase of great accomplishments. Today, we have reached 1000 views for this build log! Yay! To celebrate this milestone anniversary – I would like to thank you all the participants who made this happen! Birthday-Cake Bottle
 
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