DocBlake's HMS Blandford Cross Section Build - 1/32 Scale

tedboat

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Have just come across this build, Dave, and I have to say I'm very impressed. Will follow with great interest as it's always been my intention to do a cross-section of Kingfisher, and I have Admiralty Model's Echo kit, with additional timber from Jeff Hayes (before he retired). The idea is that I will use the Kingfisher frames drawings instead of Echo. Should be fun!

Ted
 

DocBlake

Blandford
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Thanks, Knut!

This is a complicated part of the build because several things are happening at once. This is how I plan to approach it:
1) Measure and fit the two pillars supporting main deck beam 1 and install the support pieces and bearings.
2) Pin and glue the pillars to the deck and glue them to the underside of beam 1 while gluing beam 1 to the deck clamps (use epoxy)
3) Fit and glue the two carlings that support the aft hatch.
4) Pin and glue the main jeer bit to the lower deck and glue it to the two aft hatch carlings. Also epoxy.
5) Fit the cranks
 

DocBlake

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I've worked with rosewood before, and as one of the exotics that tend to be oily, I've learned that you need to wipe down rosewood parts with acetone before finishing the wood. I did that religiously, but once I applied the poly, IT WOULD NOT DRY!! I scrubbed it with mineral spirits and acetone, and three times it failed to dry! Must have had lots of oil in it. Anyway, in researching the problem, I learned that wipe on poly requires a chemical reaction (not simple evaporation) to cure hard and dry. The oils in exotic woods contain anti-oxidants which prevent the reaction. So I reached back for an old woodworkers trick. There is a saying: "Shellac sticks to anything, and anything sticks to shellac". I used a base coat of shellac on the bits and supports, and the next coat of poly dried as expected. I'll probably do that every time from now on!
 

donfarr

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THANKS DOC,I am using ROSEWOOD AND BLOODWOOD I am not using poly on the bits but will be using it on other items, THANKS SO MUCH FOR THE TIP,,,,DOES BLOODWOOD ACT THE SAME, and I have NONE WAX SHELLAC IS THERE ANY DIFFERENCE in how the WOOD REACTS BETWEEN THE NON-WAX, and the other type. THANKS FOR SHAREING YOUR VAST KNOWLEDGE Don
 

DocBlake

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Hi Don!
Bloodwood can be oily but not so much as rosewood. Take a paper towel and moisten it with acetone and rub the wood. If "color" comes off, you'll know there is oil there. Get it as clean as you can before you glue or finish. Yes, wax-free shellac is the ONLY kind you want to use. If shellac has wax in it, it can't be used over another finish material, or have another finish over it. They just won't adhere.You're on the right track, Don!
Here's a shot of a little piece of rosewood wiped down with a paper towel moistened with acetone:dirtyrose.jpg
 

donfarr

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THANKS DOC, I am VERY WELL AQUAINTED WIT THE USE OF ACOTONE USING IT (100% ACOTONE NAIL POLISH REMOVER) I use it to take apart glued parts that I have to RE-DO BOTH PVA AND CA GLUES I PUT IT ON A COTTON SWAB AND USE A XATO BLADE TO PRY IT LOOSE IT TAKES A COUPLE OF APPLICATIONS TO REMOVE THE PARTS AND IF YOU ARE CAREFULL THERE IS NO DAMAGE TO THE PARTS NOW I HAVE ANOTHER USE FOR IT. THANKS Doc . Don
 

tedboat

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I've worked with rosewood before, and as one of the exotics that tend to be oily, I've learned that you need to wipe down rosewood parts with acetone before finishing the wood. I did that religiously, but once I applied the poly, IT WOULD NOT DRY!! I scrubbed it with mineral spirits and acetone, and three times it failed to dry! Must have had lots of oil in it. Anyway, in researching the problem, I learned that wipe on poly requires a chemical reaction (not simple evaporation) to cure hard and dry. The oils in exotic woods contain anti-oxidants which prevent the reaction. So I reached back for an old woodworkers trick. There is a saying: "Shellac sticks to anything, and anything sticks to shellac". I used a base coat of shellac on the bits and supports, and the next coat of poly dried as expected. I'll probably do that every time from now on!
Nice one, Dave - straight in to my 'useful in the future file'!

Ted
 

DocBlake

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I thought I better post something so you all know I'm still here!

I finally trimmed the top of the bulwarks to their finished length. I also used a little wood putty (I used a Dremel sanding drum for rough shaping) to fill in a few boo-boos, then sanded everything smooth. I just epoxied beam 2 of the main deck in place. Next upIMG_0415.JPGIMG_0417.JPGIMG_0419.JPG
 

Norway

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Good progress Dave, now I se how the fill blocks between the frames make the work easier when we get to where you are now.
The filling blocks are also important earlier in the process of stiffening the frames.
In my case, I think it would help because I think some of the frames are a little too low.
Greeting-
 
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