HMS Alert 1777 by Danielw

Maarten

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I don't think you screwed up Paul, according to plate II on the blue prints it is suppose to be that way (and the reverse from 36/37 onward)View attachment 186550
and just to confuse matters its all straight on plate I ?
View attachment 186554
The differences between the two plates is correct. Plate II is the sectional drawing of the keel with the keel notches, whereas plate I shows the ships side view looking at the sides of the frames, all sitting over the keel notches following the same line.
Maybe Paul switched the two floor timbers of 17 and 18.
 
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Nope I did not switch timbers, My Ribs sit as shown on the plan as shown. The problem is that at the top to 3/4 down the rib, they sit flush to each other, but under the hull they do not. Whist I can sand down to the same level, it seems strange.
Its not possible to swap the part timbers, as the wrong part will not fit in the jig. This problem is from Rib 37 to 17 at the doubles, so it not just a single pair. You will see what I mean when you dry fit the un joined pairs. The manual suggest NOT to join prior to fitting. It may be supposed to be like this.
 
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Hi Paul,
While the glue dries.....
Here we have a superb model designed drawn and cut/manufactured with what I understand is the latest technology.
The material from which this model is formed is good old natural wood /timber .There are bound to be variations in the thickness of the timber sheets;
variations in the quality of the timber sheets;
and the accuracy with which the cutting machine interprets the computer data.
So there are bound to be a couple of ill fits or tiny variations thus resulting in what could be called a" stuff up".
As an example I have a couple of sheets that on one part you can almost see daylight through the cut lines ,whilst on other parts of the same sheet it needs a scroll saw to free the parts from the sheet.
So Paul I would not sweat it,
make the adjustments as appropriate to make the part fit and look right.
It is part of the joy and challenge when working with wood.
Cheers, Danielw
 
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Hi Daniel, not a problem for me, just observation and possible solution. Like you said easy to fix. I found the comment in the manual about the Bras & jocks ( sorry Breast hooks & crotch) " The four parts , according to the actual installation to burnish" hilarious. I had significant burnishing training!

Now we wait on Trident for the cabin details( Soon I hope). I had a look at the fit out parts closely and there is a friggin lot of them( the planking is individual( cut right through), not a etching and very small and delicate!.

Making Barrels & dry fitting lower floor in the mean time.
 
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Paul,I have put some masking tape over the back of those thin sheets for the interior.. Saves them falling apart.
In the past I have often made hinges etc, from the lead/pewter from the lids of wine bottles, though these days it's all screw tops. If you want to have a giggle check out the sheets and assembly instructions for the cannons.:eek:
 
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SORRY GUYS TO POST THIS HERE BUT DO NOT KNOW WHERE ELSE NEED SOME HELP IN DECIDING WITCH TO DO FIRST THE LE COURER OR THE ALERT, FOR MY SKILL SET AT THIS POINT IMPROVING QUITE A BIT SO I THOUGHT THE LE COURER WOULD BE THE EASIER OF THE TWO NOW NOT QUITE SURE, WHAT DO YOU GUYS THINK WITCH IS THE EASIER TO DO, ALLK HELP APPRECIATED. GOD BLESS STAY SAFE ALL DON
 
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HI Don, I have never done a POF before and the Trident is very easy to work with. From my personal point of view the Courier looks slightly more complicated than the Alert. Due to the templates & berth, its very difficult to make a mistake with the Alert.

I have not used any power tools (Other than the Dremel as a drill for the fake bolts which are not necessary). If you were doing it as a straight out of the box, I doubt you will use any specialist tools. Just have a large supply of no 11 blades.

As you know I am re writing the English portion of the manual ( have an electronic copy) as I go and it will be put up on SOS for all build members ( 50 % done as that's where we are).

I'm sure someone who is doing the courier will have more to say.
 
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THANK YOU PAUL, I AM LEANING THAT WAY RIGHT NOW I WAS IN THE PROCESS OF STARTING THE LE CORER, BUT HELD OFF FOR A WHILE TO SEE OTHER MEMBERS BUILDS, RIGHT NOW LEANING TOWARD THE ALERT, MAINLY BECAUSE OF THE CLINKER FRAMES, BOTH ARE GREAT BUILDS, YES BETTER INSTRUCTIONS WOULD HELP, CAF DID ONE HELL OF A GOOD JOB WITH THE INSTRUCTIONS AND PLANS. GOD BLESS STAY SAFE YOU AND YOURS DON
 
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Hi Don, I have to agree with Paul.The Jigging and Framing of the Alert is quite good and there being little or no charred bits to clean up it is a fairly pleasant project..
Of course there are little niggly things from time to time but that is the nature of things.
As for the instructions........Read them over and over and become familiar with the processes. I often find that after a while I become familiar with the terminology used by the author and that makes interpretation easier.
Now I'm not too familiar with Le Courer so those chaps may have some input.
 

Maarten

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THANK YOU PAUL, I AM LEANING THAT WAY RIGHT NOW I WAS IN THE PROCESS OF STARTING THE LE CORER, BUT HELD OFF FOR A WHILE TO SEE OTHER MEMBERS BUILDS, RIGHT NOW LEANING TOWARD THE ALERT, MAINLY BECAUSE OF THE CLINKER FRAMES, BOTH ARE GREAT BUILDS, YES BETTER INSTRUCTIONS WOULD HELP, CAF DID ONE HELL OF A GOOD JOB WITH THE INSTRUCTIONS AND PLANS. GOD BLESS STAY SAFE YOU AND YOURS DON
Hi Don,

I think Alert is the easier build due to the use of all the templates provided to build and shape all frames.
 

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also only to confirm here the words by @Maarten . Especially because I have really both kits already in hand and working in moment on the CAF Le Coureur.
The difference is really the tricky basic structure of the Le Coureur which makes this kit more complex - I think also, that you have to be more accurate with the Le Coureur than with the Alert......
On both kits you need an open mind and not to forget to switch the brain on - also with manual and drawings - you have to think twice or three time, before you do something
 
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An update.. The beams etc for the lower deck have been dry fitted pending a decision regarding the installation or otherwise of the interior cabins and other spaces. I'm reasonably happy with them.
Just for a change I started to assemble a couple of the canons.
What a job...completed and in the right hands they are probably quite good but when you're as cack-handed as I am it is a challenge!!I've shown a couple of the partially built carriages. Have look at the component pieces on the instruction booklet and then look at the pieces themselves on their respective sheets.

20201027_205351[1].jpg20201027_205224[1].jpg20201027_205150[1].jpg
 

Jimsky

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Hello Daniel! With the beams dry fitted it does look great, I just said, WOW!! Very accurate\clean assembly. The beams find their places with no gaps. Certainly, we would like more photos!!
Just for a change I started to assemble a couple of the canons.
What are the challenges when you assemble the cannon carriages? In the photo, they look OK. With the scale they are, we can 'dress them up' e.g. add more details, I think. But, it is a personal decision and a matter of taste ;)
 
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Now about those cannon carriages...I've taken a couple of shots(pun intended) of some of the parts.
In one photo you can see the main pieces i.e. The four parts that make up the carriage cheeks and the two axles along with the fore and aft "spacing' pieces. All are as rough cut from their respective sheets.
I sand the axles down to a recognisable level and place them one at a time in my Dremel chuck.I then turn the axle at moderate speed and work the square end of the axle into something resembling "round" to accept the truck. A lot more detail to be added of course.20201028_153344[1].jpg20201028_154357[1].jpg20201028_153358[1].jpg
 
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Nope I did not switch timbers, My Ribs sit as shown on the plan as shown. The problem is that at the top to 3/4 down the rib, they sit flush to each other, but under the hull they do not. Whist I can sand down to the same level, it seems strange.
Its not possible to swap the part timbers, as the wrong part will not fit in the jig. This problem is from Rib 37 to 17 at the doubles, so it not just a single pair. You will see what I mean when you dry fit the un joined pairs. The manual suggest NOT to join prior to fitting. It may be supposed to be like this.
Paul, ????
Must have been something you said lol
 
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