Saint-Philippe 1693-POF to the Monograph by Jean-Claude Lemineur by NMBrook-1/36

Astigabay

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Hi all
I have been spending a little cash today after watching numerous YouTube reviews and some serious thinking.
Firstly,I have mentioned I was going to purchase a bandsaw for cutting the frames out and ripping stock.Now after discussing this with the sales chap in the tool shop I made a decision.The problem I have is I need a narrow blade to follow the curves of the frames but I also ideally want a wide blade to rip stock.Here in lies a problem.To buy a machine that gives you this selection of blades,I need to spend serious cash.I am not starting a cabinet making business,I only need the machine for this build so it does not need to be rated for continuous use.
I picked a small machine that uses narrow blades and is half the price of Proxxon's equivalent.I have bought many things made by this manufacturer and their spares back up is second to none.The machine does have blade guides both above and below the table(the latter as I understand is not always a given but gives a more accurate cut stopping blade flex).These guides are crude but can easily removed and replaced by a homemade system using ball races.I don't mind tinkering given the price.I will post results when I get to that stage.If I need to buy another machine to cut the thick stuff,so be it,two machines are still cheaper than one 'universal' one.
Now onto stock thicknessing.I was going to dig deep and buy a Byrnes thickness sander,this is not cheap after shipping import duty and tax is added.Further thinking and the fact that my frames are tapered in two planes made me think this was an unnecessary luxury.Infact nearly everything on this build is tapered.The tight tolerance and surface finish is only going to be removed by further work.So I spent some more cash on a reasonably priced planer/thicknesser.I have put this to the test and planed the timber I have acquired so far with results within 0.1mm.There is a slight 'ripple' from the cutting which will only require the lightest of sanding on any exposed faces.There is also a 'snipe' 50mm in from each end meaning these ends are scrap.This is common with planers and is no big deal.I include some pics including my first batch of 'sized' timber.
Next job is to sort my plan crease removal and copying.

Kind Regards

Nigel


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Nigel, have you remained happy with your bandsaw / thicknesser decisions 6 years further on? Loving your build log. Charles
 

NMBROOK

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Hi Charles and Thankyou

In short,yes.Both are what I anticipated.The thicknesser doesn't have the same degree of precision as say the Proxxon,but I bought it as it could accommodate much larger pieces.There is probably 0.2mm run off across the sheet if you are thicknessing a full width piece.I pass the piece through in both directions to reduce this.
The bandsaw can run off a little on thick hard wood due to the lack of roller guides but I bought it for cutting frame pieces out and it is very effective at this.

Kind Regards

Nigel
 

NMBROOK

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Hi All

Unfortunately my rash has not gone but I have some cream to apply to it.It isn't due to the Padauk so I can continue in earnest on this build.I will return to the build next weekend.
In the meantime,I leave you with pictures of frame no 1.I completed this just before my layoff.This is the only frame to consist of two complete layers and it is notched into the keel.There are some severe bevels on here as it is so close to the bow.These bevels are only rough.More meat to remove during fairing.

Kind Regards

Nigel

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Mecanizados

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Trabajas muy bien la madera y muy fino, eres un artista, la verdad es que lo sois todos, este barco que vas a construir es muyyyyy grande, qué gusto poder hacerlo, por lo que veo las cuadernas no son muy fáciles de ensamblar, un saludo

Google Translate:
You work very well with wood and very fine, you are an artist, the truth is that you all are, this boat you are going to build is very big, what a pleasure to be able to do it, so I see the frames are not very easy to assemble, a greeting
 

NMBROOK

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Trabajas muy bien la madera y muy fino, eres un artista, la verdad es que lo sois todos, este barco que vas a construir es muyyyyy grande, qué gusto poder hacerlo, por lo que veo las cuadernas no son muy fáciles de ensamblar, un saludo
Miguel

Gracias yery mucho q ue son demasiado amables

Saludos

Nigel
 

Olivers Historic Shipyard

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Nigel, how many material do you have for the final shape ? I got any little problems with my La Belle. The mounting tolerances was more than i needed. Its wasn´t a big problem, but for my next project i will let a little bit more material.
 

Hubac’s Historian

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Hello Nigel, and hello to all of the fine members of ShipsofScale!

My name is Marc LaGuardia, and I live and work out of Brooklyn, New York. Nigel, I have signed-on to SOS expressly to follow your fine build of Le St. Philippe, and I am sure that I will be subscribing to quite a number of other fine and interesting member build-logs, along the way.

My particular interest is in the First and Second Marines of Louis XIV. I was gifted with Mr. Lemineur’s monograph of Le S.P., two Christmases ago. I don’t intend to build her, but the monograph is the richest source, to date, for a French First-Rate from this time period.

I am using this monograph as a resource for my modification project of Heller’s Soleil Royal, the build-log for which exists on Model Ship World. In brief, I am converting Heller’s model into what I believe to be her refit appearance of 1689. The project addresses a number of corrections (within reason) to the kit architecture, while filling-in a wealth of missing detail, and wholly re-constructing the stern and quarters from scratch, in order to more faithfully represent Jean Berain’s stern. I may post an abbreviated version of that log, here.

Anyhow, my M.O., these past three years has been to seek out similarly interested researchers and modelers in the hope that we can trade information and tips, and generally make more historically representative models of our chosen subjects.

I will be very gladly following along on your journey, and I am quite happy to share my library of books, and the database of imagery, that I have been compiling for the past 3+ years.

I may not have a whole lot to say about wooden frame modeling, specifically, as I am not yet equipped with the shop space to do so. However, I am a woodworker by trade, and I have managed to develop some skill in miniature carving.

My grand ambition is to eventually (within the next 20 years) develop what I call a “forensic reconstruction” monograph for Soleil Royal, in her first incarnation.

This project largely depends upon my locating the current whereabouts, or at least better imagery for this painting, which appears to be the work of Pierre Puget:
392F105D-3999-4F41-8908-7CB0188920B9.jpeg
While this may be the Royal Louis, I have several reasons to suspect that it may be the only comprehensive surviving portrait of Soleil Royal, prior to 1689. Maybe I’m right. Probably, I am wrong. Nonetheless, that is my quest. Hopefully, the portrait is not lost to history, nor buried irretrievably in someone’s private collection.

And so, Nigel, I wish you full restoration of your health, and I look forward to watching your excellent craftsmanship, as Le St. Philippe rises from the stocks!

HUZZAH from Brooklyn,
Hubac’s Historian
 

NMBROOK

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Hi Marc welcome to the forum and Thankyou.
I am familiar with your build based on Heller's kit.It would be fantastic if you would post a concise version of your log on SOS.I am aware your log on MSW is many pages long and would be a massive job to copy here.
I am a lot better thanks and will get back to the project soon.I am going to make an improved set up for sanding the profiles of the frames to speed the process up and to extract the dust.

Soleil Royal is probably my most favourite vessel but Saint Philippe comes a VERY close second.As you say,it is the only monograph available for a first rate of this period.It is a shame the Soleil Royal is now buried under a carpark.

Kind Regards

Nigel
 

Hubac’s Historian

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Nigel - I’m reading up through your log, now, and I would like to thank you for taking the time to explain these early stages in the preparation and frame-up. It is still staggeringly complicated, but tremendously insightful. As I expected, I am enjoying the build tremendously!
 

Hubac’s Historian

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This is an interesting choice to not represent the artillery, but I can see why you would not want to obstruct the view of your beautiful framing. I’m behind in the log here, but this is all terrific stuff!
 
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