Vasa - 1:65 DeAgostini

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Hello Fellow Modelers,

One of the interesting aspects of this Vasa build is the ample opportunity for artistic expression in the area of painting (painting ridiculously small metal bits that is). Before the research completed at the Vasa museum about ten years ago it was universally accepted that the many wooden carvings on the ship were gilded and models were naturally presented that way. In recent years some (many?) have attempted to replicate what we now know to be true: the carvings on the Vasa were multichromatic. This introduces a new challenge to the modeler...and to THIS modeler in particular. Not only am I new to model ship building - but I am new to painting miniatures of any kind. The learning curve is a steep one in both regards.

Here, with humility, I present two postings that show what I have been working on in recent weeks (along with my rope making experiments).

First of all I'll show two parts that form the most forward decoration and the most aft decoration on the ship: the lion at the front and the lions (and crest) at the back:

View attachment 245967

View attachment 245968

As you can see I have chosen to flatten the gold. As far as I can tell from my research these parts were not gilded - so I have chosen to present them as painted in a gold color.

Next up are a series of Roman soldiers that will appear on the underside of the lower of the paired galleries.

View attachment 245963

View attachment 245964

View attachment 245965

View attachment 245966

The last image only shows one of a pair - I simply took the photo wrong.

In the next posting the art exhibit will continue (I learned I can only include a limited number of photos in a single post...).
Don't you just wish the researchers hadn't done their job that day and left them gilded LOL. Seriously the painting is fantastic you must have a very steady hand and great eyesight, well done.
 
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Please be patient as you work your way through this lengthy post...

This little guy is on the top of the ship's rudder...

IMG_6860.JPG

And these cherubs will be a part of the stern decoration along with the 'vase,' frame, and curtains that follow:

IMG_6867.JPG

IMG_6881.JPG

IMG_6869.JPG

IMG_6875.JPG

Next up, at the top of the stern is this gallery, a seemingly frustrated (angry?) Swedish woman, and two griffons I showed months ago (not re-posted here):

IMG_6872.JPG

IMG_6878.JPG

Flanking the gallery I just showed there will be two 'towers' - the Fabergé eggs are on the top, and the yellow things are on the bottom (and humanoid figures which have not been painted yet will be in between):

IMG_6952.JPG

IMG_6950.JPG

In the midships region you will find this odd figure:

IMG_6859.JPG

And now travelling further forward here are two Heracles adornments:

IMG_6857.JPG

And finally these nautical bits:

IMG_6941.JPG

IMG_6945.JPG


IMG_6863.JPG

IMG_6866.JPG

IMG_6954.JPG

And finally, this doubled sided casting. He is a Polish 'prisoner' and is visible to the crew members of the Vasa as they complete their business on the seats of ease (recall that Sweden and Poland were at war during the construction of the ship):

IMG_6947.JPG

If you are keeping score at home I have now completed exactly 477 decorative pieces. The smaller ones take about an hour or two each (depending on their complexity) - the larger ones take considerably longer. This is an exercise in patience.

As always, I am humbled and blessed that you might take the opportunity to stop by and visit my build log.
 
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Hi Paul!
Good painting job ! Very accurate, but for me it is expected results looking at your very accurate jobs with wood! You could add expression to the gold painting by using a few variations of the gold colors - bright gold and some dark gold... like You did with green and other colors of the soldiers armors and faces below them... it will make gilding more alive! and again back to the bitumen ... when You completed all your paintings experiments, or even not completed ... just try to use very very light diluted bitumen in whitespirit solvent as a wash ... if you use acrylic paint this solvent will not damage it. It will emphasize the relief of your decorative figures...
but first try on some sample object , to see how it will works ...
 
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Jimsky

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Hello Fellow Modelers,

One of the interesting aspects of this Vasa build is the ample opportunity for artistic expression in the area of painting (painting ridiculously small metal bits that is). Before the research completed at the Vasa museum about ten years ago it was universally accepted that the many wooden carvings on the ship were gilded and models were naturally presented that way. In recent years some (many?) have attempted to replicate what we now know to be true: the carvings on the Vasa were multichromatic. This introduces a new challenge to the modeler...and to THIS modeler in particular. Not only am I new to model ship building - but I am new to painting miniatures of any kind. The learning curve is a steep one in both regards.

Here, with humility, I present two postings that show what I have been working on in recent weeks (along with my rope making experiments).

First of all I'll show two parts that form the most forward decoration and the most aft decoration on the ship: the lion at the front and the lions (and crest) at the back:
Oh...Man...I still cannot accustom to the fact that you are new to model shipbuilding, and well...new to the painting of miniatures (of any kind) ;) While THAT modeler made a fantastic job painting 'gazillion' of miniatures, THIS modeler cannot come even close despite not being new to the ship modeling hobby. :cool: Your exceptional work can be an exemplar for many of us! Bravo!
 
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Hi Paul!
Good painting job ! Very accurate, but for me it is expected results looking at your very accurate jobs with wood! You could add expression to the gold painting by using a few variations of the gold colors - bright gold and some dark gold... like You did with green and other colors of the soldiers armors and faces below them... it will make gilding more alive! and again back to the bitumen ... when You completed all your paintings experiments, or even not completed ... just try to use very very light diluted bitumen in whitespirit solvent as a wash ... if you use acrylic paint this solvent will not damage it. It will emphasize the relief of your decorative figures...
but first try on some sample object , to see how it will works ...
Hi @kirill4 ,

Thank you for your suggestions for improving the goldwork. As a next step I added some gold acrylic ink I had on hand to the raised areas. It's more of a reflective change than a tonal change but the effect in real life is quite satisfying. It doesn't photograph particularly well but you might be able to see the change. I am experimenting with mixing gold paint to create a darker color and will add that as well if I can make it work...I have learned so far that I can't just add black paint to the gold but I'm thinking red might work. And the next time I have cut bitumen on hand I'll give that a shot.

Left is old and right is new...

IMG_6957.JPG IMG_6960.JPG

I did the same on the lion figurehead.

My thanks to everyone for your likes and kind words.
 
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Hello Fellow Shipbuilders,

Many thanks for all the 'likes' and thoughtful reviews of my recent work. I am humbled that you would take the time to visit my build log.

I had set aside my ship for a bit as I recovered from an Xacto knife injury and turned my attention to painting the seemingly endless supply of decorative metal bits. This endeavor is more than just painting - each of the pieces needs to have flash removed from the casting process, cleaned of grease and human detritus, mounted on a stick so I can hold the piece while I work on it, primed, painted, and sealed. I suppose it's just like painting a wall in your home - half the work is in the preparation...

This weekend I took a break from painting and tested the resiliency of my nearly healed wound (if you don't count the fact that I have lost all feeling in the tip of my index finger) and worked on a few small items left unfinished during my previous work (a model ship punch-list of sorts).

First, as encouraged by Sasha (@Alexander74), I added a few faux nails on the faux metal strapping next to my faux hinges on my faux doors.

View attachment 242151

Sorry about the poor photo quality.

Next I added the pulley/sheave thing you see in this photo just below the waist headrail:

View attachment 242158

What I needed to properly fabricate this box block was a shiny new yellow and green Proxxon mill (or at least a drill press) - but I haven't committed to this hobby to that degree quite yet so I made do with a hand drill, my fear-inducing Xacto, and a set of really nice needle files:

View attachment 242155

View attachment 242156

I also added a strip of profiled yellow decorate trim to mark the terminus of the red clinker planked portion of the upper hull...

View attachment 242152

And as you can see in the above image I chose to finally mount the galleries...

View attachment 242153

View attachment 242154

These freakishly ornate galleries have only begun their journey toward ornate freakishness - there are lots of decorative bits to be added, but that will require returning to my painting project...

Anyway, nothing inspirational this posting - but such is the nature of progress. You are kind to stop by...
well done mate
 
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Hi @kirill4 ,

Thank you for your suggestions for improving the goldwork. As a next step I added some gold acrylic ink I had on hand to the raised areas. It's more of a reflective change than a tonal change but the effect in real life is quite satisfying. It doesn't photograph particularly well but you might be able to see the change. I am experimenting with mixing gold paint to create a darker color and will add that as well if I can make it work...I have learned so far that I can't just add black paint to the gold but I'm thinking red might work. And the next time I have cut bitumen on hand I'll give that a shot.

Left is old and right is new...

View attachment 246142 View attachment 246143

I did the same on the lion figurehead.

My thanks to everyone for your likes and kind words.
I once tried gold paint with gold leaf over top. Then I added rose gold to make the recesses a little darker.
 
Joined
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Nice result!!!
Paul, By my opinion , it looks much ,much interesting! :)
Vic told about gold leaf...
Yes," gold" leaf - it is Force!:)
I didn't try real gold leaf, but I used imitation/artistic potal instead of... and Paul,
once You will try potal( or real gold leaf) instead of gold paint, You will never want to use any "gold" paint again ...just try...:)))
 
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Messages
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I think You could purchase it in any artistic shop..often they sell it as set, potal and special glue for it...
real gold leaf ,I think will be more expensive than imitation, but gilding effect will be almost identical...
first You need to apply thin layer of that special glue above area You want to be gilded, and than after approx 5 min, when glue got stucked a little,
You could apply potal/ or gold leaf above glued area and using soft wide and short brush gently and firmly pressurise potal all over this area, parts of potal which not glued will be just swapped away leaving gilded area shining like real gold...:)DSCN6766.JPG.jpg
 
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Missouri City, Texas
Hello Fellow Modelers,

One of the interesting aspects of this Vasa build is the ample opportunity for artistic expression in the area of painting (painting ridiculously small metal bits that is). Before the research completed at the Vasa museum about ten years ago it was universally accepted that the many wooden carvings on the ship were gilded and models were naturally presented that way. In recent years some (many?) have attempted to replicate what we now know to be true: the carvings on the Vasa were multichromatic. This introduces a new challenge to the modeler...and to THIS modeler in particular. Not only am I new to model ship building - but I am new to painting miniatures of any kind. The learning curve is a steep one in both regards.

Here, with humility, I present two postings that show what I have been working on in recent weeks (along with my rope making experiments).

First of all I'll show two parts that form the most forward decoration and the most aft decoration on the ship: the lion at the front and the lions (and crest) at the back:

View attachment 245967

View attachment 245968

As you can see I have chosen to flatten the gold. As far as I can tell from my research these parts were not gilded - so I have chosen to present them as painted in a gold color.

Next up are a series of Roman soldiers that will appear on the underside of the lower of the paired galleries.

View attachment 245963

View attachment 245964

View attachment 245965

View attachment 245966

The last image only shows one of a pair - I simply took the photo wrong.

In the next posting the art exhibit will continue (I learned I can only include a limited number of photos in a single post...).
Painting looks fantastic Paul! Great job!
 
Joined
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Messages
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Location
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Please be patient as you work your way through this lengthy post...

This little guy is on the top of the ship's rudder...

View attachment 245971

And these cherubs will be a part of the stern decoration along with the 'vase,' frame, and curtains that follow:

View attachment 245974

View attachment 245979

View attachment 245975

View attachment 245977

Next up, at the top of the stern is this gallery, a seemingly frustrated (angry?) Swedish woman, and two griffons I showed months ago (not re-posted here):

View attachment 245976

View attachment 245978

Flanking the gallery I just showed there will be two 'towers' - the Fabergé eggs are on the top, and the yellow things are on the bottom (and humanoid figures which have not been painted yet will be in between):

View attachment 245984

View attachment 245983

In the midships region you will find this odd figure:

View attachment 245970

And now travelling further forward here are two Heracles adornments:

View attachment 245969

And finally these nautical bits:

View attachment 245980

View attachment 245981


View attachment 245972

View attachment 245973

View attachment 245985

And finally, this doubled sided casting. He is a Polish 'prisoner' and is visible to the crew members of the Vasa as they complete their business on the seats of ease (recall that Sweden and Poland were at war during the construction of the ship):

View attachment 245982

If you are keeping score at home I have now completed exactly 477 decorative pieces. The smaller ones take about an hour or two each (depending on their complexity) - the larger ones take considerably longer. This is an exercise in patience.

As always, I am humbled and blessed that you might take the opportunity to stop by and visit my build log.
This is great Paul! I don’t know if it could be done better…and I am being honest!
 
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Absolutely incredible fine painting details. I'm still in the rattle can mode. Your attention to detail is outstanding. I'm really looking forward to seeing all those figures mounted in the appropriate places.

Jan
 
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Feb 2, 2020
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New York City
Yes, this ship is going to explode with color, when all of these figures are applied. I especially liked all of the accent painting on the head brackets that tuck up behind the cathead timbers; those are superbly well done. I'm glad that you have decided to highlight your gold work. It looks really good. As I remember, the figurehead still had traces of gold leaf when Anders brought it to the surface.
 
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Thank you Dean, Jan, and Marc. I am grateful for your encouraging words (along with those of many others).

One thing that is marvelously painful in presenting these macro images is the simple truth that they show flaws that I am unable to see when I am working on the pieces under 1.5 magnification. I could work at a higher magnification but then I run into the fact that my brush skills can't keep pace with what I am seeing. There is also a limit inherent in the medium I have selected (acrylics). Paints need a certain viscosity to provide coverage but viscosity is the enemy of flow. I simply do not have the experience (or knowledge) to do these better though that is what my perfectionist leanings poke at me to do. Posting macros is humbling - though I am presenting my work to folks who have been very gentle with me in their assessments. For that I am grateful. Perhaps there is a shared humility (sympathy?) among modelers who work at scale?

As for the explosion of color these bits will become - you won't have to wait too terribly long. I have started to adorn the galleries (much more fiddly than it should be - I find myself grinding a lot of metal). I seem to have lost my motivation for woodwork right now. Having said that, I have fully enjoyed my time next to a wet palate - and I have yet to master the art of making and tinting ropes so that remains a work in progress. I am viewing this period as my summer refresher (it's summer in the northern hemisphere right now) ;) .
 
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