YUANQING BLUENOSE _ E J - Eugene Schmidt

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Forgot to say;
I did some fairing on the hull, a bit at a time. I ordered more PSA sandpaper as I was down to two grits. It's coming out quite nicely.

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My grandson heads out for Parris Island Marine recruit training July 12. His mom is, well, like most mom's, very uncomfortable to say the least.
This is what most mom's see -

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Heinrich

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You have really done great work Eugene. I agree with you - weathering is always an issue to strike just that right between balance between showing up use without looking dilapidated. Of course, if the idea is to display her as a grimy, somewhat battered old fishing schooner, you wouldn't be wrong either!
 
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Forgot to say;
I did some fairing on the hull, a bit at a time. I ordered more PSA sandpaper as I was down to two grits. It's coming out quite nicely.

View attachment 241403

View attachment 241404

My grandson heads out for Parris Island Marine recruit training July 12. His mom is, well, like most mom's, very uncomfortable to say the least.
This is what most mom's see -

View attachment 241405
My admiral says, “Yes, yes!” She saw that when our son enlisted. By the way, thank you for your service, brother.
 
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Thanks. That is an old (1960's) Hasegawa 1/700 scale kit, supposedly of ESSEX CV-9. Turns out, it's more of a generic ship of the class, as there were lots of corrections to be made. I wanted it accurately depicted as I could. Scratch built the hangar deck, opened lots of hangar bay roller doors as they were most often unless during North Atlantic or heavy weather, most all the gun placements and roller doors on the port side, etc. I served aboard her in the early 60's, albeit the modernized version with the angled deck. She was the most modern ASW fitted carrier in the fleet at that time. I also have a vintage ESSEX Revell kit, produced in the late 50's in box scale (1/540) depicted as the newly refitted ESSEX as ASW. Lots of corrections on that kit to be made also. I've been collecting aftermarket do-da's for that build for several years. Tough, because of the odd scale, but that was MY SHIP and I want to do her right. I built that kit as a 16 year old, never knowing at the time I would serve aboard her. That kit got lost in the years during my service and after.

Yes, I was thinking a lighter color wood for the deck, with little to no grain. Perhaps even doing a bit of wear/weathering on it in traffic patterns. Perhaps the lemonwood might suit with a touch of burnt umber stain. I might make some from a stick of clear sugar pine I have, just to see what it looks like.We'll see. Were the bluenose decks painted at all? I was also thinking of darkening the edges of the planks with black or very dark brown to represent caulking.

Mentioning the deck woods used, it seems most people think that aircraft carrier decks were all teak, but they were in reality, douglas fir. Battleships and some cruisers had teak, but the vast amounts used on a carrier, and the rate of wear and tear, made it to expensive and availability was short for carrier use. By the late 50's and 60's, most ships of the class, (Essex and Yorktown when I served) were a hybrid of wood deck, covered in high wear areas with steel plate, and everything painted with that very thick, rough non-skid stuff.
Following your wake the carriers that our squadrons were deployed upon had flight decks of steel, I think about 3 inches thick. When we were deployed on the Ranger, in 1965/66 I had a top bunk right under the No. 3 target wire, worked nights and slept days during all of the day's launches and recoveries. Quite often the hook would slam down and chip paint off of the underside onto my face or head. Surprising what we learn or have to tolerate and become insensitive with. The arresting gear put up quite a scream and whine also. Old days glad to be past. Rich (PT-2)
 
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While waiting for my stuff to arrive, I took inventory of rigging rope I have in stock. Did a spreadsheet and added a column for 1/72 scale rope sizes. A visual also of rope sizes provided by Syren. They apparently stopped making ropes because of a lack of materials, but will be resuming production soon. Nice rope. Also, Cottage industries CIM rope, and Dry Dock.
 

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  • Syren rope sizing guide.pdf
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Joined
Aug 21, 2011
Messages
419
Points
278

Location
Michigan
Following your wake the carriers that our squadrons were deployed upon had flight decks of steel, I think about 3 inches thick. When we were deployed on the Ranger, in 1965/66 I had a top bunk right under the No. 3 target wire, worked nights and slept days during all of the day's launches and recoveries. Quite often the hook would slam down and chip paint off of the underside onto my face or head. Surprising what we learn or have to tolerate and become insensitive with. The arresting gear put up quite a scream and whine also. Old days glad to be past. Rich (PT-2)
Being a snipe, comfort was, well relative. The screaming sounds of machinery and the constant heat in the machinery spaces left a lot to be desired. BT's and MM's were pretty much avoided in the chow line because we were sweaty and dirty. Even in port, we were usually allowed to chow in dungarees. Extra mid rats and a shower after watch were permitted as well. Had to watch our water and salt intake because of the heat, especially in southern waters. Well over 100 degrees then.
No air conditioning then anywhere except in parts of officer's country.
 
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We were lucky. We had air conditioning in the belly of the B-52 bomber to keep all the electronics cool. And the alert facility where we spent a third of our lives was cush with pool tables, pinball machines, a movie room, TVs, officers' mess, and poker rooms. I'm not sad I entered the Air Force. All relative, I guess, indeed.
 
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Back from a mini vacation. Here in west Michigan, a favorite thing to do is "Go Up North", also referred to as God's Country.
Spent a few days at a favorite B&B in Ellsworth MI, following the 126 Army band as they marched in parades and put on concerts at towns in the region. My oldest son is the Equipment Sergeant for the 126 Band, so every year when they do training exercises, the Admiral and I become 126 Band groupies.
The lake right in front of the B&B had the best fireworks display I've ever seen on the 3rd. Boyne City on the 4th, Canadian Lakes on the 5th. Great trip.

When I got home there were several packages waiting for me.
More PSA sandpaper rolls so I can finish fairing in the hull framing.

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An order of rigging supplies

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Rigging rope, single and double pearwood blocks, deadeyes, cleats, brass pins.

Supplies to light the Bluenose.

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12v power supply, 12v battery adapter with switch, 5 led's, a couple of jacks for connection of power to the model base, wired connectors and shrink tube. Want to set it up so I can use either a 9 volt battery, or, for longer display, the 12 v power adapter.

Did a light test with one bulb. Warm white color was chosen.

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with the room light off.

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Absolutely no heat from them. I think 3 bulbs should do the trick. They say you can use 50 bulbs for 40 hours on one 12v battery. Two batteries, wired in parallel would last 80 hours. My old way of lighting, using 5 grain of rice incandescent bulbs would drain two AAA batteries in about an hour. Plus there was the heat factor. I once buckled a spot on a plastic carrier flight deck because I had the bulbs too close to the plastic.

In the meantime I was fitting the parts 24 thru 29 notched waterway boards port and stbd.

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I had some misalignment of frames toward the stern. Kinda surprised me as I had used these same strips as spacers when installing the main deck beam supports. I hope this doesn't give me problems down the road.

The parts 128, 130. I'll cut the port side matching parts loose from the planking sheet parts 127 and 129.

First though, install the lighting before I make it any more difficult to get them where I want them. Next post.
 

Heinrich

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Holy mackerel :eek: - those are some great surprises waiting for you on your arrival. The light color you have chosen looks very good and should make for a great addition to the model! Thumbsup
 
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Back from a mini vacation. Here in west Michigan, a favorite thing to do is "Go Up North", also referred to as God's Country.
Spent a few days at a favorite B&B in Ellsworth MI, following the 126 Army band as they marched in parades and put on concerts at towns in the region. My oldest son is the Equipment Sergeant for the 126 Band, so every year when they do training exercises, the Admiral and I become 126 Band groupies.
The lake right in front of the B&B had the best fireworks display I've ever seen on the 3rd. Boyne City on the 4th, Canadian Lakes on the 5th. Great trip.

When I got home there were several packages waiting for me.
More PSA sandpaper rolls so I can finish fairing in the hull framing.

View attachment 243012

An order of rigging supplies

View attachment 243013

Rigging rope, single and double pearwood blocks, deadeyes, cleats, brass pins.

Supplies to light the Bluenose.

View attachment 243014

12v power supply, 12v battery adapter with switch, 5 led's, a couple of jacks for connection of power to the model base, wired connectors and shrink tube. Want to set it up so I can use either a 9 volt battery, or, for longer display, the 12 v power adapter.

Did a light test with one bulb. Warm white color was chosen.

View attachment 243016

with the room light off.

View attachment 243017

View attachment 243020

View attachment 243021

Absolutely no heat from them. I think 3 bulbs should do the trick. They say you can use 50 bulbs for 40 hours on one 12v battery. Two batteries, wired in parallel would last 80 hours. My old way of lighting, using 5 grain of rice incandescent bulbs would drain two AAA batteries in about an hour. Plus there was the heat factor. I once buckled a spot on a plastic carrier flight deck because I had the bulbs too close to the plastic.

In the meantime I was fitting the parts 24 thru 29 notched waterway boards port and stbd.

View attachment 243025

I had some misalignment of frames toward the stern. Kinda surprised me as I had used these same strips as spacers when installing the main deck beam supports. I hope this doesn't give me problems down the road.

The parts 128, 130. I'll cut the port side matching parts loose from the planking sheet parts 127 and 129.

First though, install the lighting before I make it any more difficult to get them where I want them. Next post.
That should keep you very busy!
 
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