Hms Alert by Maarten

Uwek

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Thx Uwe.
The tip from @Jimsky works great.
One question about this to @Maarten and @Jimsky :
When you have the wire sanded flash with the timber - How you can keep the burr really on top of the wire / nail?
I have the fear, that if you start the drill and the burr starts to turn, the burr will walk over the timber surface and will not stay exactly over the bolt?
 

Jimsky

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One question about this to @Maarten and @Jimsky :
When you have the wire sanded flash with the timber - How you can keep the burr really on top of the wire / nail?
I have the fear, that if you start the drill and the burr starts to turn, the burr will walk over the timber surface and will not stay exactly over the bolt?
Answering on my behalf. You are correct, if you make the wire a.c.a. bolt flush with the frame - you cannot make the head with the bur. So... you will make those bolts already rounded (both ends), and then just push them thru the hole after the final sanding (inside-outside). However, if you drill hole 0.38 ~0.39mm drill bitt, the wire should go tight into the wood and shouldn't twist while 'rounded' the head.
I choose to make bolts flush to the frames, but... if you wait till this evening, I will reveal the secret of my latest discovery, which could be yet another option, IMHO. It doesn't require a bur... and makes nice rounded heads. ;)
 

Maarten

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One question about this to @Maarten and @Jimsky :
When you have the wire sanded flash with the timber - How you can keep the burr really on top of the wire / nail?
I have the fear, that if you start the drill and the burr starts to turn, the burr will walk over the timber surface and will not stay exactly over the bolt?
It is possible to do it, I did it with these test pieces. Just press the burr on the of the wire. My bur is 0,8 mm with sharp edges. My wire is 0,4 mm so the burr edges wil press into the wood, then start the drill and the harde brass wire will keep the burr in place.
See the effect below, the were flat filed brass wires before applying the burr.
20201023_153842.jpg
 

Jimsky

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It is possible to do it, I did it with these test pieces. Just press the burr on the of the wire. My bur is 0,8 mm with sharp edges. My wire is 0,4 mm so the burr edges wil press into the wood, then start the drill and the harde brass wire will keep the burr in place.
Yes, you can do it this way, but... the bur also 'eat' some wood and makes hole appearance a bit bigger which I do like as I called a 'washer' effect.
 

Maarten

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Before continueing on the stern I removed already a piece of the berth to look at the bow frames, these are the enjoyable moments of a full frame build like this.
20201029_191232.jpg
20201029_191207.jpg

Yes we continue on the stern section.
After fitting the wing transom and counter pieces I have fitted the deck transom.
20201027_211550.jpg
Then onto the stern timbers above the counter.
The are square and should be diamond shaped following the shape of the stern on the inner and outside.
20201029_195000.jpg
20201029_201138.jpg
4 timbers create the stern plus two fashion pieces on the corners.
20201029_203047.jpg
20201029_203139.jpg
For the corner fashion pieces there are sticker templates provided, to properly fit them you have to file the berth into correct shape.
20201030_165112.jpg

Now on to the other fashion pieces 72 to 76.
They all have to be filed or sanded into shape to fit correctly onto the counter timber. This is a lot of trimming and fitting.
20201030_180507.jpg
Until satisfactory fitting is created.
20201030_200915.jpg
Inside and outside.
20201030_201024.jpg

The stern is now finished, next are the stern cant frames.
20201030_201147.jpg
20201030_201536.jpg
 
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In that second picture the fairing of the frames look perfect.
Did you sand/fair the frames after you glued them in place or were they sanded separately as per the template stickers before you placed them in the jig?
If this is the result of the accuracy of Trident's kit (and Maarten's skills) then I think a strong recognition and appraisal of the quality of both is in order.
 

Jimsky

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Before continueing on the stern I removed already a piece of the berth to look at the bow frames, these are the enjoyable moments of a full frame build like this.
Yes, Maarten, I am completely in synch with you! They are truly enjoyable moments, and if they are the way you made them, it is double-joy!!! Great job on both: cant frames and stern sections!
In that second picture the fairing of the frames look perfect.
Did you sand/fair the frames after you glued them in place or were they sanded separately as per the template stickers before you placed them in the jig?
If this is the result of the accuracy of Trident's kit (and Maarten's skills) then I think a strong recognition and appraisal of the quality of both is in order.
Hello John, It is a combination of accuracy of Triden's templates, and for sure, Maartens skils!!! Check my log, post #203 I have not shape mine yet.
 

Maarten

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In that second picture the fairing of the frames look perfect.
Did you sand/fair the frames after you glued them in place or were they sanded separately as per the template stickers before you placed them in the jig?
If this is the result of the accuracy of Trident's kit (and Maarten's skills) then I think a strong recognition and appraisal of the quality of both is in order.
Thx gents for the comments.
I haven t been finishing anything yet, this is how the come out of the process using tridents templates.
The fairing is nearly perfect if you cut the frames into the deadwood and create a good fit to the keel, think that is essential.
Final finishing I will do when she comes out of the berth.
 

Maarten

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Coming back to the frames, after marking the fairing using the templates I trim the outside curvature fairing of the frames using my sanding disc.
20201102_212222.jpg

The inside curvature fairing I do with a small sanding drum.
20201102_212701.jpg

Then the finall trimming with a small file and scraping with a razor blade untill a smooth surface is reached.

Last weekend I ran some preproduction of the stern cant frames.
20201101_201132.jpg
20201102_202228.jpg

The first of these are now trimmed and fitted.
20201102_213848.jpg
 

zoly99sask

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Coming back to the frames, after marking the fairing using the templates I trim the outside curvature fairing of the frames using my sanding disc.
View attachment 189463

The inside curvature fairing I do with a small sanding drum.
View attachment 189464

Then the finall trimming with a small file and scraping with a razor blade untill a smooth surface is reached.

Last weekend I ran some preproduction of the stern cant frames.
View attachment 189465
View attachment 189466

The first of these are now trimmed and fitted.
View attachment 189467
Hi Maarten ,what is the purpose of the plastic on the templates?
 

Jimsky

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Hi Maarten ,what is the purpose of the plastic on the templates?
Zoly, this is the so-called 'Plastic wrap'. Ask your Admiral, most likely she has it somewhere in the kitchen, It is a very thin 'film' used to wrap the food before storing them in the fridge.
As per Triden's recommendation (it does make sense), it prevents frames from gluing to the templates jig while assembling.
 
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