HMS Ontario 1780 Cross Section scale 1:32

DocBlake

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I’m not sure why gunports on a weather deck had lids in the first place. Most don’t. If it rains, the guns get wet. The deck is high enough above the waterline that sea water coming in isn’t a problem. Why bother with gun port lids? Anybody know the reason?
 

Mike41

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Hi Dave,
The waterline does not mean anything in a storm. I expect the ship would take on a lot of water without gunport covers. Just an opinion.
 

zoly99sask

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Hi Zoltan,
Since we have solver the little door mystery by identifying the illuminator and cover over hole to take end of rammer while gun port is closed, should we include this detail in our models? John McKay did not show them on his drawings but if the Ontario had them, I would like to add them to the models. I will make a scale detail drawing of the gun port assembly if we decide to add the little doors.
I would say make it optional,if somebody wants to add that detail the drawing is there,do you want to make a full gunport and lids with the port lining assembly drawn up?Like on the those drawing posted?
 

DocBlake

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Take a look at this - than you understand why lids were necessary
I get your point, Uwe! But the fact is that on most ships. the guns on a deck exposed to weather DID NOT have port lids. Checking some ships in the ATOS series:

Gun port lids: Essex
No gun port lids: Blandford, Pandora, Bellona, Granado, Diana, Leopard

Why the difference?
 

Uwek

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What is the little door in the gun port cover used for? Is it in the top or bottom of the cover?
And I found the confirmation of my suggestion with the small doors inside the port-lids in "The Construction and Fitting of the Sailing Man of War 1650-1850" from Peter Goodwin.
These small scuttles were for ventilation, started with ships from 1778.

IMG_1555.JPG IMG_1554.JPG

IMG_1556.JPG IMG_1557.JPG

BTW: For everybody interested. These mentioned books (Lavery, Goodwin and Lees for rigging) are very helpful to understand the technique and construction elements of these ships, so if you can get a copy - buy it!

Detailed Book Reviews you can find here on SOS with click on the title

The Construction and Fitting of the Sailing Man-of-War, 1650-1850
Arming and Fitting of English Ships of War, 1600-1815
The Masting and Rigging of English Ships of War, 1625-1860
 

Mike41

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Upper Deck Clamps & Interior Lining:

The Deck clamps were bent using the forms made for the wales and clamped in place with spring clamps. The opening in my spring clamps were not long enough to reach the lining next to the waterway, I made a few tee shaped jigs to hold the upper deck spirketting in place while the glue dried, they are easy to make and worked well.
IMG_2179.JPGIMG_2180.JPGIMG_2181.JPGIMG_2182.JPGIMG_2183.JPGIMG_2184.JPGIMG_2185.JPGIMG_2186.JPGIMG_2187.JPGIMG_2188.JPGIMG_2189.JPGIMG_2190.JPG
The reference drawings I am using didn’t have any details on the gun port covers or openings. Our previous conversation about the illuminator and rammer cover was very helpful, I will be revising the gun ports and making the covers next.
 

Mike41

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Thanks Jim, I like using bloodwood, I usually make a mess when I try to paint something, so I use different woods for the color pallet.
 

DocBlake

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Bloodwood looks great, but it's not that much fun to work with. It's brittle and splits and splinters easily. If you take your time, though it finishes beautifully. It looks great as inboard bulwark planking and gun carriages.

Mike: Just beautiful work! Really nice. I want to start this build NOW!!
 

Mike41

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Hi Dave,
Bloodwood is not as easy to work with as box or bass wood, especially when bending planks. I usually soak it in hot water for about 20 minutes and clamp it in a curved form to dry before installing the planks. I haven’t had any problems with it splitting with flat work.
Hopefully you will be able to start the build in the early part on the new year. Have a merry Christmas.
Mike
 

Dave Stevens (Lumberyard)

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I’m not sure why gunports on a weather deck had lids in the first place. Most don’t. If it rains, the guns get wet. The deck is high enough above the waterline that sea water coming in isn’t a problem. Why bother with gun port lids?

that is a good point and from what I can find war ships on the Great Lakes did not have gun port lids

the Niagara did not

DSCN6816.JPG

the Jefferson did not

jefferson.jpg

nor did the eagle

but that does not mean ALL ships did not have gunports take a look at the wreck of the Ontario

122-giant-deadeyes.jpg

this section is right here on the model

ontario port.jpg

if the Ontario did not have gun port lids there would be a black opening like the stern windows, but the area where the gun port is, is covered with Zebra mussels so they must be on the surface of the lid. It is difficult to tell but the lid surface looks smooth and no sigh of a little door, you would think there would be some sort of shadow or bump if there was a little door in the lid. remember this ship was build in a wilderness shipyard where iron was hard to come by so I don't think there was a little door, just because of the iron work for the hinges.

stern03.jpg
 
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Mike41

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I’m not sure why gunports on a weather deck had lids in the first place. Most don’t. If it rains, the guns get wet. The deck is high enough above the waterline that sea water coming in isn’t a problem. Why bother with gun port lids?

that is a good point and from what I can find war ships on the Great Lakes did not have gun port lids

the Niagara did not

View attachment 68563

the Jefferson did not

View attachment 68564

nor did the eagle

but that does not mean ALL ships did not have gunports take a look at the wreck of the Ontario

View attachment 68565

this section is right here on the model

View attachment 68566

if the Ontario did not have gun port lids there would be a black opening like the stern windows, but the area where the gun port is, is covered with Zebra mussels so they must be on the surface of the lid. It is difficult to tell but the lid surface looks smooth and no sigh of a little door, you would think there would be some sort of shadow or bump if there was a little door in the lid. remember this ship was build in a wilderness shipyard where iron was hard to come by so I don't think there was a little door, just because of the iron work for the hinges.

View attachment 68567
I will add a detail for the little door on the drawing as an option for builders that would like to add them
 
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