My FIRST ship build: La Couronne Corel/scratch

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The foremast was glued in place in the forecastle. The mast alignment jig was used to make sure it was vertical. A 6" long liquid carpenter's level was used to make sure that the hull was perfectly level. A piece of a drill bit was used as a pin for the mast, but before the drill bit was broken to obtain the shank for the pin, the bit was inserted into the hole drilled into the bottom of the foremast. The angle of the drill bit in the mast was checked by turning the mast in my fingers with the tip of the bot on the table. Any misalignment was corrected and the bit was glued temporarily into the end of the mast. The mast itself was then used to drill the hole in the upper deck (which is below the forecastle deck) using the bit while ensuring the mast was vertical. Certainly there are easier ways to step the mast into place, but this was quick, and after applying PVA glue to the bottom of the mast, the pin ensured that the alignment of the mast was good. A final check was made with the alignment jig, and the lowest section of the foremast lined up perfectly with the string of the plumb bob.

Using thin pieces of shaved wood, chocks were added to the surface of the bowsprit behind the collars for the blocks installed earlier. This was a small detail, but every detail counts when the model is finished.

All the 7mm deadeyes were stained with Danish Oil (Walnut). A couple of the 7mm deadeyes and chain plates were made as a start to preparing the chainwales for rigging of the shrouds. The new chain plate sets from Model Expo were used instead of the simplified ones supplied by Corel in the kit. The brass wire surrounding the deadeye was round, and this portion of the wire was straightened, then reshaped into the triangle to hold the 7mm triangular deadeye reshaped earlier. The lower chain plate double eyed link and the copper flat plate were assembled onto the upper chain which holds the deadeye. Before the wood deadeye was inserted and the wire closed around it, the chain plate assembly was blackened with brass blackening solution. At the bottom of the deadeye, the ends of the wire are butted, but but soldered. I know it's a better practice to solder the connection, but the break in the wire is too close to the wood in this design, and soldering would char the wood, and leave a silver shiny spot that requires painting later. The wire appears to be stiff enough to take the stress of the shroud tension without bending the deadeye loop open. The open wire joint will be hidden fairly well between the deadeye and the chainwale, and any gap can be filled with a touch of glue and paint.

619 Drill Bit Shank For Mast Pin.jpg

620 Pin in Foremast Base.jpg

621 Glue in Foremast.jpg

622 Glue Chocks Behind Bowsprit Collars.jpg

623 First 7mm Triangular Deadeyes and Chain Plates.jpg
 
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Amati chainplate assemblies will be used instead of the Corel ones. Some of the chainplate assemblies were made and the foremast chainwales were marked using a temporary false shroud line. Notches were cut in the chainwales with a Dremel tool and cutting wheel, then filed to final depth and shape to accept the chainplates on both sides of the hull for the foremast. The chainplate assembles were blackened in a glass bowl, then small needle nose pliers are used to bend the chainplate parts to place the deadeye in the correct angle at the top, and form to fit the wale on the hull at the bottom. The ship hull was tipped in its side to allow me to work easier. Two back pins were used to nail the bottom of the chain plate to the wale and hull. The upper pin was installed first, being held with pliers in my left had while a tack hammer was used to tap the pin into the hull with my right hand. The final taps were made with the jaws of the pliers touch the pin head to set the pin all the way in. Since all this fitting and working rubbed some of the blackening off the chainplates, they were painted black with a small brush once they were installed. More chainplate assemblies need to be prepared and installed next, after which a strip of walnut will be used to cover the the outboard edge of the chainwales.

624 Assembly More Deadeyes.jpg

625 Blacken Chainplate Assemblies.jpg

626 Mark Shroud Locations.jpg

627 Mark Shroud Locations.jpg

628 Form and Nail First Chainplates.jpg

629 First Couple of Chainplates.jpg
 
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Port side chainplates are complete for the foremast shrouds. Note that the dog bone piece of each chainplate has to be resized so that the anchoring part at the bottom rests on the wale. Small round jawed need nose pliers are used to reform some of the dog bones to make them shorter as necessary. The loose chainplates that appear out of aligniment at this point will pull taut once the shrouds are installed. That way each chainplate will be aligned perfectly with the axis of each shroud respectively. It was tricky relocating the chainplates and chainwales such that nothing will interfere with the line of sight of any of the guns. However, relocating the chainwales is a more accurate feature for many ships of the early 1600's. Mantua's La Couronne is built this way, but Corel's is not. I prefer the Corel stern design over Mantua's because the height is more realistic and not derived from an artist's woodcut or painting, which often tends to romanticize the sheer curvature and stern gallery height to an impractical extreme.

631 Port Side Foremast Chainplates.jpg
 
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In preparation for installing the main mast shrouds, the main mast was pinned and glued into place. The plumb bob jig was used to make sure it is lined up with the foremast, vertical but with about 3-4 degrees rear rake angle. More nailheads were painted onto the tops, topmast cheeks and topgallant cheeks. After the glue for the mast started to get firm, the mast cover was let slip down the mast and glued to the deck. The mast cover is what covers the mast wedges that anchor into position in the upper deck.

632 Glue Main Mast in Place.jpg

Main mast top
644 Paint Main Top Nailheads.jpg

Main topmast top
645 Paint Main Topmast Top Nailheads.jpg

Main topmast cheeks
646 Paint Main Topmast Cheek Nailheads.jpg

Mizzenmast top
647 Paint Mizzen Top Nailheads.jpg

Mizzen topmast cheeks
648 Paint Mizzen Topmast Cheek Nailheads.jpg

Foremast top
649 Paint Foremast Top Nailheads.jpg

Fore topmast top and cheeks
650 Paint Fore Topmast Top and Cheek Nailheads.jpg

Main mast wedge cover at the base of the base of the mast on upper deck
651 Glue Mainmast Coating  Around Mast to Deck .jpg
 
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The chainplates for the main mast on the starboard side were assembled and installed today. I can't complete the ones on the port side until some parts come in from Modeler's Expo. First, the locations of the shroud lines need to be determined. They need to be placed such that they don't block any of the cannons. A line tied to the mast top is used to mark the line locations on the edge of the chainwale. The line is laid over each mark on the chainwale to locate and mark where the chainplates will attach to the hull. It's important that the chainplates run parallel to the shrouds when the hull is viewed straight from the side.

The process of nailing the chainplates to the hull is simple, even though the parts are small. Each individual chainplate assembly is adjust to the correct length for each place on the hull by shortening the dogbone link to the required size, siuch that the upper nail position is on the wale on the hull. The upper nail is held with a small needle nose pliers, the nail inserted into the hole in the backing link of the chainplate, and hammered into the wale with a tack hammer. The nail head was set using the end of a needle file tang using the tack hammer. The angle of the chainplate is checked to see if it is parallel to the shroud line, then the second (bottom) nail is hammered and set into place. When all the chainplates have been nailed in place, a 2m x 2mm strip of walnut wood is glued to the outboard edge of the chainwale. CA glue was applied near the edges and at one spot in the center of the chainwale, and PVA glue is applied along the remaining areas of the edge. When the wood is pressed into place, the CA glue binds immediately and holds the piece in place while the PVA glue dries. It's faster that holding the piece in place for 20 minutes waiting for it to hold. A small detail brush is used to paint the chainplates black to cover brass that was exposed by handling and shaping the chainplate parts.

The mizzen mast was glued into position on the ship. A nail with the head cut off was glued into a hole in the base of the mast. The mast was test fit, lined up, then the mast head was tapped with a track hammer, such that the nail in the mast bottom pierced the deck below. The mast was then pull back out, glue applied, and glued into place. The coat was the slid down and glued to the bridge deck.

652 Mark Shroud Line Positions on Chainwale Using Line.jpg

653 Mark Chainplate Locatons Using Line.jpg

654 Cut Notches for Chainplates.jpg

655 Customize Lengths of Chainplates.jpg

656 Check Fit of Chainplate.jpg

657 Tack Hammer in Dirst Nail.jpg

658 Set First Nail.jpg

659 Form Chainplate Over Wale Using File and Tackhammer.jpg

660 Chainplate Formed Over Wale.jpg

661 Hammer in Second Nail and Set.jpg

662 Mainmast Chainplates Completed on Stbd Side.jpg

663 Put PVA and CA Glue on Edge of Chainwale.jpg

664 Trim Piece Glued Ove Chainplates.jpg

665 Touch Up Chainplates with Black Paint.jpg

666 Glue Nail Into Base of Mizzenmast.jpg

667 Mizzenmast and Mast Coat Glued Onto Deck.jpg
 
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A correction was made. I installed 9 chainplates on each side for the foremast, when there should be 8. So, I removed the rearmost ones and patched the holes in the chainwales. Oops....

CORRECTION AGAIN 4/2/20: I put the chainplates back a bit later, so there are 9 on each side. The backstays will not have their tackles on the channels, but attached to the hull on the wale above the channels.

668 Correction - Removed Rearmost Foremast Chainplate.jpg
 
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Hi Darivs,
I have build La Couronne too but the Mantua version, a bit different from yours but it's a beautiful ship. I had so much fun and you are doing a great job as first model, I like that blu and the leds inside the ship makes it even nicer. Well made precise and clean congratulations! Okay I will follow you to seethe progresses
 

Uwek

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Here's a cost update. The attached spreadsheet shows all model related expenses, including tools, research books, custom parts, and materials. The total cost so far is $2595.31 US.
Very good good looking progress :cool:
Sometimes it is better not to remember and collect all the bills we are making ....... especially tools and power tools are for every and should be depreciated over a minimum 100 models, or better 1.000 models => with this trick the costs are much much lower ;)
 
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Installation of many blocks in preparation for rigging was done in various parts of the ship. Blocks which are part of the tackles which haul the main course yards in a downward direction were attached to the deck on front of each mast. Correction 4/22/20: Corel shows a lines leading from the main course yardarms to a tackle attached to the deck in from of each mast. These made no send to me, because there is no reason why you need a tack to haul a yard DOWN. So, these three blocks lashed to the deck will be used for the toprope tackles, which are used to haul the topmast aloft in a telescope-like motion when setting the topmasts in place in the shipyard. Later on in the build, these blocks were replaced with double blocks.

For all blocks, the eyelets were attached to the stropping of each block. The ends of the stropping line for each block was held to the block by using black thread to seize the ends, one end of which passed through the eyelet first. The seizing was secured with CA glue. The shanks of the eyelets were then glued into holes the deck. Blocks and eyelets which secure the port and starboard hoist tackles when they are stored were installed in the waist of the upper deck. Cleats were attached to the forecastle deck directly behind the catheads. These will be used to secure the line which the cathead uses to hoist the anchors, port and starboard.

Since I plan of storing two anchors on each side of the ship on the forward channels, two timberheads were added aft of the forecastle. for tying off the lines for the tackles used to maneuver the anchors into the rear positions. This arrangement will be more evident later when the anchors are installed. Eyelets with blocks having hooks attached were installed on the forward channels for anchor handling tackles for the anchors. stored in the forward positions.

The fiddle blocks for the tackles of the fore topmast backstay and the two main topmast forestays on each side were prepared. The bitter ends of the stropping line were glued together with a small amount of CA glue. Then an elongated hole was drilled onto the top of the block. The ends of the stropping line are inserted and glued into this hole, such that the stropping line forms a loose loop above the block. The loop is then inverted, being folded over the block and the line is glued to the sides of the block. The excess loop, now at the bottom of the block, will be used to form and eye. Each lower fiddle block had an eye formed in the stropping line, formed with a seize at the bottom of the block. To this eye, a wire hook is attached, using needle nosed pliers to close the loop at the top of the hook. The hooks were made from blackened wire using a round nosed pliers and regular flat jawed needle nosed pliers. The upper fiddle blocks for the backstay tackles will be rigged later when the backstays are installed.

670 Stropping Blocks.jpg

671 Seizing to Form Eye on Block.jpg

672 Fix Block to Deck  in Front of Foremast.jpg

674 Fix Block to Deck  in Front of Mainmast.jpg

674 Fix Block to Deck  in Front of Mizzenmast.jpg

675 Blocks and Eyes for Port & Stbd Hoist Lines to Deck.jpg

676 Attach Cleats to Forecastle Deck for Catheads.jpg

677 Install Timberheads Behind Forecastle for Anchor Handling Lines.jpg

678 Install Block on Fore Channels for Port Anchor Handling Hoists.jpg

679 Install Block on Fore Channels for Stbd Anchor Handling Hoist.jpg

680 Strop Fiddle Blocks for Backstay Tackles.jpg

681 Finished Lower Fiddle Blocks for Fore and Main Backstay Tackles.jpg
 
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Uwek

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Very good looking blocks - well done
 
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I had a panic session when I confused "cable laid (left hand laid)" and "hawser laid (right hand laid)" with the terms "cable" and "rope". Alexey at Donimoff's Workshop was kind enough to educate me. I thought his bit of wisdom was worth passing on to others:

In few words: rope is made from yarns, cable is made from ropes. Ropes are always opposite lay to source yarns. Cables are always opposite lay to source ropes.
I use fabric yarns which is already right lay. So my ropes are left lay. Then I put these ropes to another machine and make cables. So my cables are always right lay.
In meanwhile it doesn’t matter which lay to use on a model. This is a model.
In a real world they may produce as right lay ropes and as left making then left or right cables.

Alexey


He provided rope and cables to me for La Couronne. His cables are right hand laid and his ropes are left hand laid, all originating from the yarns he uses which are right hand laid. This created a bit of confusion for me when referencing the illustration in RC Anderson, in which showed the difference between cable laid and hawser laid ropes.

Thanks Alexey !
 

Maarten

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I had a panic session when I confused "cable laid (left hand laid)" and "hawser laid (right hand laid)" with the terms "cable" and "rope". Alexey at Donimoff's Workshop was kind enough to educate me. I thought his bit of wisdom was worth passing on to others:

In few words: rope is made from yarns, cable is made from ropes. Ropes are always opposite lay to source yarns. Cables are always opposite lay to source ropes.
I use fabric yarns which is already right lay. So my ropes are left lay. Then I put these ropes to another machine and make cables. So my cables are always right lay.
In meanwhile it doesn’t matter which lay to use on a model. This is a model.
In a real world they may produce as right lay ropes and as left making then left or right cables.

Alexey


He provided rope and cables to me for La Couronne. His cables are right hand laid and his ropes are left hand laid, all originating from the yarns he uses which are right hand laid. This created a bit of confusion for me when referencing the illustration in RC Anderson, in which showed the difference between cable laid and hawser laid ropes.

Thanks Alexey !
Hi Darius,

I also use Domanoff rope machine. But it definately makes a difference if you use rope or cable laid. For anchor cable and main rigging stays cable laid was used, for all running rigging rope was used. If you twine the ropes yourselve you can make cable and rope in the same diameters by just selecting a different size yarn.
The yarn is rope laid and is available in all different thicknesses, this means after your first run through the ropewalk you create cable, if you combine these cables again through the rope walk you make rope, etc etc, building up the thickness of your rope or cable. That means you can create correct diameter cables for anchor cable and stays cable and ropes for the rest of the rigging.
 
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Well, I decided to push ahead using the right hand laid cables that Alexey provided. Maybe I'll make left hand laid shroud lines on the next ship.

A lot of work has been done recently getting the shroud rigging off to a start. I made a deadeye spacing tool for later use from a couple paperclips and two deadeyes. Shroud lines were cut and formed into pairs. A piece of wood held in a bench vise made tying the seizes easier. The shrouds are 1.0mm right hand laid cable provided by Alexey at Dominoff's Workshop. The shroud pairs and seizes were placed on the masthead and the seizing lines cinched tight, starting on the starboard side and alternating from one side to the other, forward-most shroud pair to to after-most shroud pair. Room was left beneath the first pair of shrouds to allow the top to be glued into place. The last single pair of shrouds were actually spliced together using small pliers, needles, and very steady hands. The needle made a good miniature marlin spike. No one else will ever see this tiny splicing, but I know it is there. ;)

After studying how to lash deadeyes, work began. The shroud is glued to one side of the upper deadeye to make tying easier. A seize of the overlapping shroud line is made at the top of the deadeye, the seizes are added farther up. All the seizes that hold the shroud line above the deadeye were tied with whip knots. Small individual alligator clips are used to hold the line in various places for each seize. After some practice, you learn a method for doing them without fumbling around too much. Tan colored 0.25mm line was used to make the lashings. Now the spacer tool is removed.

Starting with a stopper knot at the end, the line is fed through the deadeyes. After the deadeyes, it is half hitched, then wrapped four turns around the shroud standing part and bitter end. I passed the end of line between the shroud cords with a needle to prevent if from unwinding as the final seize was made at near the end of the lashing at the top of the rig. After a long day, four pairs of shrouds were completed. Ship-1

683 Making a Deadeye Tool.jpg

684 Deadeye Tool.jpg

685 Seize First Pair of Shrounds.jpg

686 First Pair of Shrouds.jpg

687 Hang Shroud Pair on Masthead.jpg

688 Tighten Seizing Against Mast.jpg

689 Install Shroud Pairs.jpg

690 Prepare to Cut-Splice Last (Odd) Shroud.jpg

691 Cut Splice Complete.jpg

694 Glue Shroud Around Deadeye.jpg

695 Seizing Above Deadeye.jpg

696 Two Seizings Above Deadeye.jpg

697 Attach Top to Crosstrees.jpg

698 Top Installed.jpg

699 Begin Lashing Deadeyes Port Side.jpg

700 Seize Shroud Line.jpg

701 Progress on Port Side.jpg

702 Deadeye Lashing Detail.jpg

703 Progress So Far.jpg
 
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