Donnie's HMS Blandford Cross Section Build: 1/32 Scale

Norway

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Donnie, I have to admit I've never used (BOM), because I don't know anything about the American measurement system,
Yes, I have tried conversion calculators and have not made it, therefore I have measured everything directly from the drawings in mm.
Therefore, there has been a good deal of custom design on my model.
Regards-
 

Uwek

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Hallo Donnie,
I do not know, if you know topic about the ship history of the Blandford?
If not, than you will get some more appetite to build this section model (or maybe somebody else).....
 

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@Norway
Conversion is probably not the best word to use here. I should have used "rounding off" as most of the sizes in the BOM are estimated cut-to-length and NOT the length of timber to actually buy. For instance, if a piece is listed in the BOM as 1/4" x 1/4" x 9- 9/32", it just means that I will need a strip that is about 10" in length from a supplier and I will CUT the length as listed in the BOM / plans for this particular strip.

I am more familiar with BOM's for metal machining projects where the BOM is going to list the RAW size and not the final CUT size. But, I want to make myself perfectly clear here. Machining metals is a different world from this hobby.
Like, in machine parts, if I am to make (2) all-thread screws at 4 inches long for perhaps an 8-32 thread.
Then the BOM for machine part will say something like 1 piece bar stock @ 12" long x .25 dia.
As it is customary that first, the stock will be cut in half first, then some of the stock has to go up into the head-stock of the lathe. So, the designer just specified the 1 piece at 12" long x .25 So, it is my own perception based on experience from another medium and hobby.
 

Donnie

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Thank you Uwe, I am going to build the Cross Section as this is an opportunity that I need to take advantage of - it will be growing pains. Kits come with all the materials needed. This project (for me) demands a little more attention to detail.
I have ordered the Blandford AOTS book as a companion. Once I get my wood selection completed and give Dave S. my selection, then I think all will be ok then. I am probably over-worried about nothing.
I always have a bad habit of looking too deep into things first, instead of just relaxing and going with the flow. Even as a professional broadcast studio engineer, I have to first look at the simple correction first (as usual, the problem is very simple - f.e, someone forgot to turn the power on)
 

Norway

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Donnie, As you refer to, For example, if a piece is listed in BOM as 1/4 "x 1/4" x 9- 9/32 ", this is like reading Greek to me.
I am not a mechanical engineer, measurements in mm-cm and meter, works well for me since that is what I grew up with.
What I mean is that I use my digital measurement tool directly on the drawings to create the different parts.
BDW, I am impressed with your preparation before you start building, it sounds like you have great knowledge in machining, good.
 

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I wanted to take some time to play around with turning a Cannon. The wood used was just basic off the shelf square stock from Hobby Lobby and therefore is not useful and suitable for turning the actual Cannons on deck. Therefore this was just an exercise in methods more than anything. I am reluctant to show images, but they are only for illustrations. I borrowed Knut's (Norways) primary method of attaching a Cannon CAD drawing to square blank stock (as I did not have any round stock available) only for the purpose of assisting in identifying the "steps" in the Cannon. I used a Caliper taking measurements off of plans for the Diameters.
The real Cannons made, I will just transfer all measurements of the CAD drawing. I would like to find some "medalion" to attach to head of Cannon.
Note: The Lathe Tailstock has a bearing type spinning "Live Center". This keeps the end of wood from burning from friction.

cannon-test01.jpg

cannon-test02.jpg
 

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That’s pretty good Donnie, I also have a mini lathe/mill combo machine and was planning to do the same but in aluminum round stock (just happened to have the stock). Doing it in wood will be easier and I will take up your idea when the time comes to do mine
 

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I thought about metal too and it can be done. Using Brass, the steps or reinforcing rings can be made using a soft metal like brass and a file (one that has a sharp angle) edge. In order to get the other complicated curves would require either a course file or a TOOLED DYE template. I have found that aluminum is a little tricky and a little bit too lightweight.
I can put some aluminum on the lathe later to see how that turns out ( no pun intended). There is a slight angle going towards the end of the cannon, I am sure there is a technical term to it. I would say that would be my first cut is to get that angle right and length. If I were to guess, that slight slope is probably about 2 °.
Brass is heavier and does not chatter like aluminum - in other words, trying to find the right cutting speed for AL is more tricky to get a nice solid but.
Stay tuned.

Donald
 

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Very good result Donnie, if your lathe can be used on metal, then it is probably much easier to make the steps on the rings.
I'm going to turn number two today, I've also started making the (carts)?.
Regards-
 

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Again, this might not be the final product. What I am doing is just testing and an exercise in material selection. So, therefore if this is truly a "log" of events, then the content should be available in case someone else wishes to try this as well.

This video is just a simple element of making first cuts and thought it was ok for entertainment value. It is not really meant as a tutorial on how to operate a lathe. Some material are more forgiving with some slightly worn cutting tools. I found out (obviously) that I had to grind a fresh new tool for aluminum. Aluminum is not my favorite material. NOTE: the cutting tip needs to have a good "radius" smooth edge rounded to make the aluminum cut with a smooth finish. At least about a 1/64 or .5 mm radius on cutting tool tip.

This video only shows the first initial cuts. I might follow up with more videos.


Here are the basic step by step cuts.

.75 inches / 19.05mm Aluminum Stock
cannon01.jpg



Sherline lathes allow for Headstock to be rotated. Therefore about 1.5 ° is set.
This is to obtain the angle / slope of the cannon barrel.

cannon02.jpg



The first dimension: Muzzle tip to first ring.
cannon03.jpg


cannon04.jpg


cannon05.jpg


cannon05B.jpg


cannon06.jpg


cannon07.jpg


cannon08.jpg

At this time, the "chase" is completed and I am ready to cut and form the second part reinforce (middle) of the cannon. I will drill hole for Cannon Bore when I determine the size of ball.

Stay tuned if you wish.

Donald
 

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This wraps up the Cannon, and I think I am going to keep it. I probably have about 4 hours invested in this. Two tools, a regular RH (right hand cutting) and a parting tool, and straight cutting tool.
I hope this continuation does not seem redundant to those. But, I thought it was a good exercise until my Framing Material comes in from www.dlumberyard.com

First up is a video - this is not the best video as it is choppy and some scenes do not make sense. It is difficult to figure out how to mount camera and perform cuts, so, I just handheld my camera video. I envy those that really produce good youtube content on Mills and Lathes. It is apparent that they have a fixture that controls the camera on/off.


No Narration on the images. I think they speak for themselves this time.
The blue die is called Dykem and helps locate marked parts.
The raw stock was just a little too short and almost did not leave enough room to finish model.

cannon09.jpg

cannon10.jpg

cannon11.jpg

cannon12.jpg

cannon13.jpg

cannon14.jpg

cannon15.jpg

cannon16.jpg

cannon17.jpg

cannon18.jpg

cannon19.jpg

cannon20.jpg

cannon21.jpg

cannon22.jpg

cannon23.jpg

cannon24.jpg

cannon25.jpg

cannon26.jpg

cannon27.jpg

cannon28.jpg



 

Oskar27

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Nice looking gun Donnie, congrats. I made a simple stand out of 1"x2" Pine for my camera which is attached to the side of my lathe table. The stand swivels/tilts to allow you to set any position you want. Others have mount the stand on the top of the lathe which is better
 

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Donnie, good result, which I thought it seems easier to have control over the tool with this kind of lathe.
With my Proxxon micro lathe db 250, I use hand chisels that are not as easy to control for an untrained man as me.
But, exercise makes master, old jungle word !.
Regards-
 

Donnie

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The wood selection for Frames and Keel arrived today from The Lumberyard. Dave is sponsoring this build of which I really appreciate it. The image is a batch of Birch for the frames, Keel, and another type for the deck planking. The deck planking material he sent me was Tulip Poplar (smaller two pieces on the left) which have a gray tone to it. I will attempt to saw out the deck planking using the gray parts of the wood. I wish to have a light grayish tone to decks.
I am not an expert on wood types. Therefore what I see seems ok to me. All of it is within the tolerance of what Dave advertises on his site. I do not have a drum thickness planer. That will be needed to provide the thickness and finish necessary. Byrnes Machines website is either down or something is wrong as I cannot access it. My other choice would be the MicroLux Drum sander. I am not too fond of a blade-type as I need to be able to operate this inside the house.

birch-stock01.jpg
 

Donnie

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There are many choices out there from Harbor Freight, Micro-Mark, Taig, Sherline, Proxxon. I can only tell you that I have been able to do many things with my Sherline 17" bed. Many accessories too. I was trying back then to decide between the Micro-Mark and the Sherline. I got the Sherline full lathe package to make sure that I had everything I needed to start working. The Digital Read Out (DRO) for X and Y is a must in my opinion. And this is all that Sherline does, so they got you covered in case there is a problem. Plenty of educational material and how-to's. They are based in California - not that it makes much difference I guess. They are constantly improving and adding things to their product line.
 
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