Hms Alert by Maarten

Joined
Aug 5, 2019
Messages
349
Points
278

No, I did not order yet. I'll do some experiments first. I do not have any 0.2 mm brass plate in da house but I have 0.1 and 0.3 mm. I'll try to cut a 1x1 mm piece of each, drill a 0.45 mm hole in both and see if it is possible to squeeze a small 0.5 mm brass pin through the hole. Alternatively I'll buy some 0.4 mm brass wire amd try how much head size it will make to "cut"it by rolling it with a 45 degree edge. For different reasons it will take some time before I can make such experiments but I guess it will also take months before I get to this point of the build.
I noticed RB Motion also sells button head brass pins but that way will also be rather expensive (almost unbelievable BTW that they also have hexagon bolt pins and nuts where the diameter of the hexagon is only 0.63 mm)
This is the last one from me about tiny bolts/washers. There was a great Scale Hardware company number of years ago, went down and - yesterday, I learned they are still around, different name. Check this out: https://model-motorcars.myshopify.com/collections/small-parts-hardware
 

Jimsky

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Nov 3, 2018
Messages
6,197
Points
738

Location
Brooklyn, New York USA

Maarten

Staff member
Forum Moderator
Joined
Sep 10, 2017
Messages
2,284
Points
628

Location
The Netherlands
In between adding all bolts to my hull I worked also on adding a hull protection doubling for the anchor.
In the AOTS book you can t find it but I have seen it on the contemporary model of HMS Hawk which is of the same building programm as the Alert.
d4071_7.jpg

I expect Alert had this also. These cutters had rather large anchor and when hauling an anchor at sea with a light swell there was definately the risk of the anchor hitting the hull. A clinker build ship with it plank edges exposed will be more vulnerable in this aspect.

So time to add this second layer and smooth out the clinker construction.
First I determine where to fit it, it is not mentioned on the drawings. But it is there to protect the hul when getting the anchor from the cat head to the side.

First I hang the anchor from the cat head.
20210219_130813.jpg
20210219_130843.jpg

Then swing it to the side.
20210219_130828.jpg
20210219_130849.jpg

This determines the place for the doubling.
20210219_131449.jpg

The doubling I make with the same wood as my hull planks and add a layer on top of the planks.
20210219_134101.jpg20210219_152121.jpg20210219_173450.jpg

Now I file the planks to a smooth surface.
20210219_173501.jpg
20210219_175905.jpg

The doubling is nailed to the hull planks, for this I use 0,35 mm steel wire pressed into pre drilled holes.
20210220_165644.jpg
20210219_185419.jpg

After cutting of the wire ends, I file and sand the surface and continue with the bolts on the bow section.
20210220_184108.jpg
20210220_184042.jpg20210220_184556.jpg

Finall finishing I do when the outer hull is oiled.
 
Joined
Mar 19, 2020
Messages
195
Points
203

In between adding all bolts to my hull I worked also on adding a hull protection doubling for the anchor.
In the AOTS book you can t find it but I have seen it on the contemporary model of HMS Hawk which is of the same building programm as the Alert.
View attachment 215055

I expect Alert had this also. These cutters had rather large anchor and when hauling an anchor at sea with a light swell there was definately the risk of the anchor hitting the hull. A clinker build ship with it plank edges exposed will be more vulnerable in this aspect.

So time to add this second layer and smooth out the clinker construction.
First I determine where to fit it, it is not mentioned on the drawings. But it is there to protect the hul when getting the anchor from the cat head to the side.

First I hang the anchor from the cat head.
View attachment 215056
View attachment 215058

Then swing it to the side.
View attachment 215057
View attachment 215059

This determines the place for the doubling.
View attachment 215060

The doubling I make with the same wood as my hull planks and add a layer on top of the planks.
View attachment 215061View attachment 215062View attachment 215063

Now I file the planks to a smooth surface.
View attachment 215064
View attachment 215065

The doubling is nailed to the hull planks, for this I use 0,35 mm steel wire pressed into pre drilled holes.
View attachment 215067
View attachment 215068

After cutting of the wire ends, I file and sand the surface and continue with the bolts on the bow section.
View attachment 215069
View attachment 215070View attachment 215071

Finall finishing I do when the outer hull is oiled.
Hoi Maarten,

ive been following your blog with great interest, particularly around how to get the best results in terms of clinker planking and nailing. I’ll make up my mind what I think is best for my coureur, which is my learning project in model ship building but also my passion.
I could not help noticing that the planks on your alert have colour differences. I have got the same issue with the kit supplied planking on the port side hull. The cherry wood ranges from dark brown (almost purple) to a light pink. I’m not too bothered about it as I presume the old shipwrights didn’t consider matching colours in planks a priority but I was wondering what your opinion was on this.
 

Maarten

Staff member
Forum Moderator
Joined
Sep 10, 2017
Messages
2,284
Points
628

Location
The Netherlands
Hoi Marcel,

I wont be bothered to much about the difference in colour of planking as long as you can mix it a little and spread it over the whole hull. What I mean is that you don t end up with a model which is dark in the front and light coloured in the rear.

The differences in colour is depending also on type of wood you use. Cherry has quite a big variation whereas pear for instance is much more homogenous in colour as long as you don t use steamed and usteamed pear mixed up.

On my Alert the frames are coming from the kit, so I had to deal with the colour variations as provided but I think they where ok. For the outside planking I have sawn three billets to planks and mixed them up to spread the colour differences.

Keep in mind that also uv light will change the colour of your model over time, most probably bringing the different shades closer together.

Finally we are working with natural material wood bringing your model to live. In the end every model will be different with its own finger print. The difference in wood colours will help you achieving this.
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
15,739
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Hoi Maarten,

ive been following your blog with great interest, particularly around how to get the best results in terms of clinker planking and nailing. I’ll make up my mind what I think is best for my coureur, which is my learning project in model ship building but also my passion.
I could not help noticing that the planks on your alert have colour differences. I have got the same issue with the kit supplied planking on the port side hull. The cherry wood ranges from dark brown (almost purple) to a light pink. I’m not too bothered about it as I presume the old shipwrights didn’t consider matching colours in planks a priority but I was wondering what your opinion was on this.
Like Maarten wrote in my building lof of the Coureur, that the planking of the Alert and the Coureur is hard to compare, more or less impossible.
And not only because the planking here is pure scratch and the planks of the Coureur are kit elements.
The biggest difference in my opinion is the fact, that on the Coureur you have much more rows of planks, than on the Alert, which is resulting in wider planks - and with this a complete different appearance.

20210220_184556.jpg

IMG-5486.jpg

So f.e. the nails size is maybe good for one model, but not for the other one - and also the same with the color differences in the planks
Both models are showing different colors and I think, that this is the salt in the soup, showing that we are working with a natural product
 

Maarten

Staff member
Forum Moderator
Joined
Sep 10, 2017
Messages
2,284
Points
628

Location
The Netherlands
In the mean time more then 400 copper bolts are in my hull. Just over 1/3 is finished.
To avoid getting bored by hammering and cup burr drilling I took a small side step to plank the lower stern.
This is the planking at a 45 deg angle with 4 planks in the top row and 3 along the stern downwards.
20210228_150732.jpg

As the planks have to join the hull planks I have to trim a lot to get all angles correct. The first one to fit in is the bottom one. Before fitting the planks the edges are painted with dark brown ink.
20210228_130551.jpg
20210228_131256.jpg

For every plank I first tailor the free end at the correct angle. Then I roughly write off the size and shape.
20210228_131130.jpg

Saw it and fit and sand and fit etc till it properly fits.
20210228_131228.jpg
20210228_131946.jpg

Untill all planks are fitted. And the surface flattened with a file.
20210228_142646.jpg
20210228_154211.jpg

On the top I make a freeze separating the lower and upper transome.
This freeze I make from a strip of 2,2 mm square cherry which I cut from a cherry billet.
20210228_145331.jpg

The freeze I scrape with a profile I cut into a razor blade.
20210228_145800.jpg

Then tap the strip with double sided tape to a flat surface and scrape it untill you have the preffered shape.
20210228_150152.jpg

The freeze is glued in place.
20210228_155419.jpg
20210228_203206.jpg

The stern planks are not bolted, so these I treenail.
20210228_203057.jpg20210228_203011.jpg

And the bolts, thats still work in progress.
20210228_213621.jpg
20210228_214432.jpg
20210228_214517.jpg
 
Joined
Aug 23, 2020
Messages
451
Points
278

Location
Wadsworth, Illinois, USA
In the mean time more then 400 copper bolts are in my hull. Just over 1/3 is finished.
To avoid getting bored by hammering and cup burr drilling I took a small side step to plank the lower stern.
This is the planking at a 45 deg angle with 4 planks in the top row and 3 along the stern downwards.
View attachment 217078

As the planks have to join the hull planks I have to trim a lot to get all angles correct. The first one to fit in is the bottom one. Before fitting the planks the edges are painted with dark brown ink.
View attachment 217082
View attachment 217083

For every plank I first tailor the free end at the correct angle. Then I roughly write off the size and shape.
View attachment 217085

Saw it and fit and sand and fit etc till it properly fits.
View attachment 217086
View attachment 217087

Untill all planks are fitted. And the surface flattened with a file.
View attachment 217091
View attachment 217092

On the top I make a freeze separating the lower and upper transome.
This freeze I make from a strip of 2,2 mm square cherry which I cut from a cherry billet.
View attachment 217095

The freeze I scrape with a profile I cut into a razor blade.
View attachment 217097

Then tap the strip with double sided tape to a flat surface and scrape it untill you have the preffered shape.
View attachment 217098

The freeze is glued in place.
View attachment 217099
View attachment 217100

The stern planks are not bolted, so these I treenail.
View attachment 217101View attachment 217102

And the bolts, thats still work in progress.
View attachment 217103
View attachment 217104
View attachment 217105
Oh my. That's a lot of cup burr work... Lovely beginning on the stern.
 

Maarten

Staff member
Forum Moderator
Joined
Sep 10, 2017
Messages
2,284
Points
628

Location
The Netherlands
The bolts are beautifying her but I guess, making more weight. ;) As for the transom caulking you are still using 'black' PVA?
Thx gents.

No the caulking is done with dark brown ink.
Using black pva here offers insufficient control on the result, it will mess up the surrounding wood of the stern.
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2020
Messages
1,809
Points
488

Location
Eugene, Oregon
In the mean time more then 400 copper bolts are in my hull. Just over 1/3 is finished.
To avoid getting bored by hammering and cup burr drilling I took a small side step to plank the lower stern.
This is the planking at a 45 deg angle with 4 planks in the top row and 3 along the stern downwards.
View attachment 217078

As the planks have to join the hull planks I have to trim a lot to get all angles correct. The first one to fit in is the bottom one. Before fitting the planks the edges are painted with dark brown ink.
View attachment 217082
View attachment 217083

For every plank I first tailor the free end at the correct angle. Then I roughly write off the size and shape.
View attachment 217085

Saw it and fit and sand and fit etc till it properly fits.
View attachment 217086
View attachment 217087

Untill all planks are fitted. And the surface flattened with a file.
View attachment 217091
View attachment 217092

On the top I make a freeze separating the lower and upper transome.
This freeze I make from a strip of 2,2 mm square cherry which I cut from a cherry billet.
View attachment 217095

The freeze I scrape with a profile I cut into a razor blade.
View attachment 217097

Then tap the strip with double sided tape to a flat surface and scrape it untill you have the preffered shape.
View attachment 217098

The freeze is glued in place.
View attachment 217099
View attachment 217100

The stern planks are not bolted, so these I treenail.
View attachment 217101View attachment 217102

And the bolts, thats still work in progress.
View attachment 217103
View attachment 217104
Nice work again, I like the razorblade as shaper. I never think about to use these things for the job.
I had forgotten about shaping a razor blade for a molding scraper. I don't need one right now but am going to give it a try as the Amati scrapers that I have don't have some of the shapes/sizes that I needed in the past. Nice filing work bringing the siding and transom planking together with those difficult angled edges. Rich (PT-2)
 

Uwek

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
15,739
Points
938

Location
Vienna, Austria
Wow - Great appearance
my friend - this is very good work
and I am positively surprised about the appearance of the bolts at the inside planking - I was afraif, that it is getting a mess there, but NO
Congrats already for the actual step - very well done - and you are fast ;)
 
Top