La Couronne Corel/scratch 1:100 First build [COMPLETED BUILD]

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Verry hard to find word to tell you how much I love your work
Way over my skill
Thank you Charles, words cannot express how gratifying it is to have one's work admired and appreciated. The build is getting tougher now, with rigging becoming more difficult because of lack of space to work among the lines and masts. If you have any suggestions on what to add to the model or questions regarding it, please let me know. It's how I learn too.
 
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Thank you Charles, words cannot express how gratifying it is to have one's work admired and appreciated. The build is getting tougher now, with rigging becoming more difficult because of lack of space to work among the lines and masts. If you have any suggestions on what to add to the model or questions regarding it, please let me know. It's how I learn too.
I haven't thought this all the way through yet, Kurt, but I wonder if it would be easier to do the running lines for the yards before doing the shrouds and ratlines. They do get in the way when trying to tie off the lines on the belaying pins. Maybe on my net ship I'll give that a try.
 
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I've seen others tie lines to belaying pins and leaving them hang off the side prior to rigging shrouds. That approach has huge advantages later in rigging. You don't have to reach in through shrouds and ratlines to attach lines to belaying pin racks like I am. This is my first run at rigging. Lines for manipulating sails are being added beyond the instructions of the original kit, so the instructions did not provide guidance for when certain lines should be installed. The kit provided a limited amount of line to use, so extra line had to be purchased. Corel was so precise in providing only enough wood that when applying the final mahogany layer to the hull, only two sticks of wood were left over after planking was completed.
 
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I've seen others tie lines to belaying pins and leaving them hang off the side prior to rigging shrouds. That approach has huge advantages later in rigging. You don't have to reach in through shrouds and ratlines to attach lines to belaying pin racks like I am. This is my first run at rigging. Lines for manipulating sails are being added beyond the instructions of the original kit, so the instructions did not provide guidance for when certain lines should be installed. The kit provided a limited amount of line to use, so extra line had to be purchased. Corel was so precise in providing only enough wood that when applying the final mahogany layer to the hull, only two sticks of wood were left over after planking was completed.
We are definitely learning through experience.
 
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I tried my hand at putting waves in one of the rayon flags. The flag was cut out and the edges applied with a very small amount of CA glue to prevent fraying. Dowels held with masking tape were used to create a wave pattern in the flag, and it was starched and dried. The result was adequate. Future flags may come out better with practice.

1143 Starch Flag Between Dowels to Make it Wavy.jpg

1144 Sprit Topmast Flag Shaped.jpg

I devised a way to tie a line to a rail with the coil hank all in one process. The steps are shown below.
1) Tie an overhand knot on a 4mm dowel.
1148 Rope Hank and Line for Line Belayed to Rail,  Step 1 - Overhand Knot.jpg

2) Take a short length of line and form a loop.
1149 Step 2 - Form Loop with Short End of Line .jpg


3) Take the long length of line, long enough for the finished rigged line, and make several wraps around the held loop.
1150 Step 3 - Wrap Line Around Loop to Make Rope Coils.jpg

4) Pass the entire length of the long end (on the left) through the loop.
1151 Step 4 - Cut Line to Length from Spool and Pass End Thru Loop.jpg

5) draw the loop tight.
1152 Step 5 - Line Passed Thru Loop.jpg

6) A coil of is now seized.
1153 Step 6 - Draw Loop Tight.jpg

7) Tie and overhand knot to secure the loops of the coil together.
1154 Step 6 - Tie Overhand Knot.jpg

8) Apply PVA and soak the coil through.
1155 Step 7 - Soak Coil with PVA.jpg

9) While still damp and pliable, slip the coil off the dowel.
1156 Step 8 - Slide Coil off Dowel.jpg

10) Completed coil.
1157 Step 9 - Flatten Finished Coil and Shape with Fingers.jpg

11) Shape the coil with your fingers and bend it as if it were laying over the rail.
1158 Step 10 - Add Some Bend to Coil For Natural Hang on Rail.jpg

12) The piece of wood below simulates a rail. At this point you would simply use the short end and the long length to tied the coil onto the rail on the model, apply some PVA underneath it to glue it in position, and adjust it until it looks right.
1159 Step 11 - On Model, Tie Coil to Railing with Overhad Knot.jpg

Here is an example of the a line with coil tied to the aft railing of on the forecastle.
1160 Port Fore Topgallant Sheet Tied to Railing with Rope Coil.jpg
 
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Rigging continues. All the lines for the fore topgallant sail except the bowlines were rigged today. The steps are shown below for clarity.

Tie the fore topgallant lift lines to the belaying pins symmetrically port and starboard on the forecastle rail.
1145 Tie Fore Topgallant Lifts to Belaying Pin .jpg

Run each fore topgallant lift line up through the tops on each side of the crosstree, then through two blocks, and tie off on the flagstaff. The topgallant lift lines are done.
1146 Rig and Tie Fore Topgallant Lifts to Yard.jpg

In preparation of rigging the bowlines for the sails on the foremast, four blocks were tied to the bowsprit just in front of the foremast stay line.
1147 Tie Four Blocks to Bowsprit for Bowlines.jpg

Rig the topgallant sheet lines, starting with tying the lines with coils to the aft rail of the forecastle, port and starboard symmetrically.
Port side:1160 Port Fore Topgallant Sheet Tied to Railing with Rope Coil.jpg

Stbd Side:
1161 Stbd Fore Topgallant Sheet Tied to Railing.jpg

Pass each sheet line up through the tops and crosstrees, then through two blocks on the topsail yardarm, and let the ends hang for now.
1162 Pass Each Topgallant Sheet up Thru Two Blocks on Topsail Yard.jpg

Tie the port fore topgallant clew line, with coils already made on the end, to the rail just behind the cathead.
1163 Tie Port Fore Topgallant Line with Coils to Rail Behind Cathead.jpg

Do the same for the starboard fore topgallant clew line.
1164 Stbd Fore Topgallant Line Tied to Rail Behind Cathead.jpg

Pass the fore topgallant clew lines up through the tops and crosstrees to the blocks on the fore topgallant yardarm.
1165 Pass Fore Topgallant Clew Lines up Thru Tops and Blocks on Yard.jpg
Now the fore topgallant sheets and clews are hanging loosely above, ready to attach to the sail.
1166 Fore Topgallant Sheets and Clewlines Ready.jpg

Attach the fore topgallant sail to the topgallant yardarm with gaskets in the form of robands. The gaskets are loops of line tied at the top with a square knot after passing around the yardarm twice and through the sail once. Roband gaskets are only one method of attaching a sail to the yard, and are correct for this period. The connect the sheet and clue lines to the sail.
1167 Tie Fore Topgallant Sail to Yard with Robands and connect Sheets and Clewlines.jpg

Tie the fore topgallant brace lines to the rail, port and starboard, and run them through double sets of single blocks that are attached to the main mast stays. The lines then pass through the pennants attached at each end of the yardarm and tied off to the main topgallant stay line. The braces were adjusted to turn the yardarm to starboard since this ship is being rigged with sails deployed for a port side broad reach.
1168 Tie Fore Topgallant Bracelines to rail and Run Thru Three Sets of Blocks on Stays .jpg

The fore topgallant braces are now complete.
1169 Rig Topgallant Braces.jpg

Here's how the ship is looking thus far. Rigging of the fore topgallant bowlines is next, then work begins on the running rigging for the fore topsail.
1170 Progess So Far 45.jpg
 
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The fore topgallant sail bowlines were rigged. Things are really getting crowded. It take literally hour to tie lines to rails and belaying pins using dental pics, needle nose pliers, and dabbing a tiny bit of glue every pass around a belaying pin so delicate that is you sneeze, you'll demolish the entire pin rack. These pins are slivers, 9mm Falkonet pins, the smallest made. So far I've broken about two dozen since the build started. Anyhow, the bowlines were made using 2mm blocks, also the smallest ones available from Falkonet, and the same ones I used to rig the cannon gun truck tackles. I noticed that the "one size fits all" approach of most kits is to use only a few sizes of HUGE blocks, making the model look out of scale if it's smaller like this one. So, I've been buying lots of smaller blocks and figuring out which sizes go where. I've also started to use thinner thread for the running rigging than the instructions call for. Not everything has to be a hawser. These changes are slowly occurring to me over the build since this is my first ship and everything has a steep learning curve, mostly the days of research and information gathering.

Back to the rigging. The bowlines are really thin thread. After attaching them to the sails, the lines are run through blocks on the fore topgallant approximately half way down the stay line, then through 2mm block attached to the aftermost shroud of the sprit topmast, about halfway up the shroud, and then rearward to blocks on pinrail called the "range", located on the beakhead under the bowsprit.

The hardest part of these lines is figuring out where to belay them. I'm reconciling the belaying plans of both Core and Vincenzo Lusci's Costrulamo insieme il modello de La Couronne; Vascello francese del 1636, and both are in Italian. Google translate is so literal that when translated, a cleat in Italian come out as "ankle", bowline as "upwind" and so on. This is no longer a ship build, it's a word puzzle. There were not enough belaying pins on the range rack. Lines terminate in different locations, and Firenze has belaying pins along all the rails of the forecastle. Where Lusci has pins, I'll just be tying the lines to the rails. This presence of belaying pins on a ship this old is controversial. On my model, there will be an arbitrary mix of use of pins and tying to rails. So, two lines on the range and two on the forecastle rails will have to share the same belaying pins just to fit everything in. I can't WAIT to work on a larger size more. 1:100 scale is proving difficult when you fully rig the ship with all the sails and running rigging.

1171 Fore Topgallant Bowlines.jpg

1172 Rigging Fore Topgallant Bowlines.jpg
 
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The fore topgallant sail bowlines were rigged. Things are really getting crowded. It take literally hour to tie lines to rails and belaying pins using dental pics, needle nose pliers, and dabbing a tiny bit of glue every pass around a belaying pin so delicate that is you sneeze, you'll demolish the entire pin rack. These pins are slivers, 9mm Falkonet pins, the smallest made. So far I've broken about two dozen since the build started. Anyhow, the bowlines were made using 2mm blocks, also the smallest ones available from Falkonet, and the same ones I used to rig the cannon gun truck tackles. I noticed that the "one size fits all" approach of most kits is to use only a few sizes of HUGE blocks, making the model look out of scale if it's smaller like this one. So, I've been buying lots of smaller blocks and figuring out which sizes go where. I've also started to use thinner thread for the running rigging than the instructions call for. Not everything has to be a hawser. These changes are slowly occurring to me over the build since this is my first ship and everything has a steep learning curve, mostly the days of research and information gathering.

Back to the rigging. The bowlines are really thin thread. After attaching them to the sails, the lines are run through blocks on the fore topgallant approximately half way down the stay line, then through 2mm block attached to the aftermost shroud of the sprit topmast, about halfway up the shroud, and then rearward to blocks on pinrail called the "range", located on the beakhead under the bowsprit.

The hardest part of these lines is figuring out where to belay them. I'm reconciling the belaying plans of both Core and Vincenzo Lusci's Costrulamo insieme il modello de La Couronne; Vascello francese del 1636, and both are in Italian. Google translate is so literal that when translated, a cleat in Italian come out as "ankle", bowline as "upwind" and so on. This is no longer a ship build, it's a word puzzle. There were not enough belaying pins on the range rack. Lines terminate in different locations, and Firenze has belaying pins along all the rails of the forecastle. Where Lusci has pins, I'll just be tying the lines to the rails. This presence of belaying pins on a ship this old is controversial. On my model, there will be an arbitrary mix of use of pins and tying to rails. So, two lines on the range and two on the forecastle rails will have to share the same belaying pins just to fit everything in. I can't WAIT to work on a larger size more. 1:100 scale is proving difficult when you fully rig the ship with all the sails and running rigging.

View attachment 179858

View attachment 179859
That is precisely why I opted not to fully rig my Connie at 1:100. I really don’t know how you have the time for that much research. You are quite busy. But the model is coming along very nicely. I’m so impressed with what you’ve done so far.
 
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Hello everyone! I was surfing Craig's List today and found a half completed OLD Panart San Felipe for sale. I got it for $5.00 USD! Unfortunately the former owner is deceased, (that's stone dead for all you in Rio Linda, CA). I only had to drive 8 miles to pick up the model Lucky me. I made repairs to damage like a punctured an badly water stained deck and broken railings. Three decoration castings and all but one of the cannon trucks are missing, but the rest of the kit appears to be there. Too bad San Felipe was a fictional vessel. This vessel is too late in features for 1690. Was Panart confusing it with the Real Felipe of 1732? The hull is straight and planked well, but there are dagger planks where there should be drop planks. Much of the kit is plywood, not good hardwood. The wood is very dry and most of the brass fittings are tarnished brown. It must have been purchased many decades ago. The instructions were typed on a mechanical typewriter and copied. Included was an English translation of the Italian instructions that Frank Mastino wrote for Model Shipyard back in 1983. I wonder how the builder got that? The first two cannon decks have false cannon barrels (YUCK!). I can't go back and install cannon trucks at this stage without ripping off planking, and I'm not that devoted to this vessel for that. Rumor has it that Panart (Mantua) made changes to this kit to make it easier to get the positions of the cannon ports correct. On this model, cutting them will be a lengthy, slow and careful affair. This ship will sit on the shelf until after La Couronne and HMS Sovereign of the Seas are done.

1 San Felipe Kit as Purchased Used.jpg
 
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Reef points were added to fore topsail. One reef point is placed in the center of each sail panel. Very thin thread was used since the ship is small in scale, otherwise the reef points would appear as thick as the sheet lines. The idea was to make them appear in scale when viewed at a distance. A overhand knot was only used on the rear side of the sail, since a second knot, as used on full size reef points on the front side, it not necessary and would not be visible anyhow. Masking tape is used to hold the reef points pointed down as a small dab of watered down PVA is applied only to the point where the line passes through the sail. This is done on the rear side first, where the knots are, and then on the front side. A heat gun is used to speed drying and set the thread in position. After the tape is removed from both sides, the reef points are trimmed to even length. Variations in how they hang make them appear lifelike, and the glue droplets ensure they don't stick out away from the sail.

1173 Begin Installing Reef Points on Fore Topsail.jpg

1174 Tape Holds Reef Points Down While Applied Spots of Glue Drie.jpg

1175 Rear Side Reef Points Cut to Length.jpg

1176 Repeat on Front With Glue Applied Only to Where Reef Passes Thru Sail.jpg

1177 All Reef Points on Fore Topsail Done (Front).jpg

1178 All Reef Points on Fore Topsail Done (Rear).jpg
 
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I had to make a correction to the fore topgallant sheets. I mistakenly ran the sheets through blocks on the topsail yards located close to centerline, then down toward the deck. The topgallant sheet lines double as topsail lard lift lines, and re-routed through pennant blocks attached to the underside of the topmast top, then down toward the deck and their belaying pins. The picture below shows the starboard line in the corrected place. Since the lines were too short once re-routed, a length of line was spliced into the existing line by splitting the fibers, meshing them into the split fibers of the extension line, and applying dilute PVA glue. The splice is then rolled it your fingers until all the loose fibers are reintegrated into the line, and the line is twisted a bit to make the grafting complete. It's too hard to actually make long splices in 0.25mm thread when it's already attached to the model and you have 10 cm of loose end to work with. The end result is hard to spot the splice on.

1179 Corrected Topgallant Sheet (Topsail Lift) Line to Pass Thru Pennant.jpg
 
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Pictures below show the method I use to attach blocks to the clews on sails for the clewlines. The loops for the clews are rather small, and small 2.5mm blocks are used instead of the oversized 4mm blocks provided by Corel. Work on the fore topsail rigging progressed a lot today. The clewline, sheets and fore topsail braces were rigged.

1) Pass a loop of thread through the sail clew.
1180 How to Tie Blocks to Sail Clews - Step 1 Insert Loop of Line Thru Clew.jpg

2) Take the loop of the thread and flip it over the bitter ends and cinch tight. The loop of the clew should extend out enough so that you still can tie the sheet line on later.
1181 Step 2 - Pass Loop Ove Ends of Line.jpg

3) Make and overhand knot with the ends of the thread as shown below, and then cinch it, not too firmly.
1182 Step 3 - Make one overhand Knot and Cinch.jpg

4) Make a second overhand loop, but this time leave it open to accept the block.
1183 Step 4 - Make Second Overhand Knot to Form a Loop.jpg

5) Insert the block with the end pointed toward the clew and tighten the overhand loop.
1184 Step 5 - Insert Block in Loop.jpg

6) Note how you can still pass a needle through the loop. You can still tie the sheet line to the clew later. Apply a small amount of CA glue to the top of the block, and to the bottom of the block at the clew so the block won't fall and trim the ends of the thread off.
1185 Step 6  - Apply Glue and Trim Line Ends.jpg

Sheets and clewlines for the fore topsail are belayed to four locations on the forward rail of the forecastle near centerline.
1186 Topsail Clew Lines and Sheets Belayed to Center of Forecastle Rail.jpg

1187 Rig Fore Topsail Clews, Sheets, and Braces.jpg

1188 Front of Topsail.jpg
 

Uwek

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Very good work on the rigging and sails - looking very good.
I just saw also your attempts on the first flag - this is very difficult to produce a flag blowing in the wind - to make it realistic
The waves in the flag are no moving usually not parallel, due to the own weight of the canvas.
You are from USA, so I was choosing your flag

the effect is much bigger, as longer the flag is / was (sorry, did not find a US-flag ;) )



usually you have a wave in the canvas following the green line
flag-3130435_960_720.jpg

I am writing this, because you mentioned, that you want to try better results with practice...
 
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Very good work on the rigging and sails - looking very good.
I just saw also your attempts on the first flag - this is very difficult to produce a flag blowing in the wind - to make it realistic
The waves in the flag are no moving usually not parallel, due to the own weight of the canvas.
You are from USA, so I was choosing your flag

the effect is much bigger, as longer the flag is / was (sorry, did not find a US-flag ;) )



usually you have a wave in the canvas following the green line
View attachment 181002

I am writing this, because you mentioned, that you want to try better results with practice...
Thanks Uwek! I will adjust the flag to look more like these pictures.
 
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Because of lack of documentation available, we know very little about the use of martnets or leechlines on topsails until after 1650. For the 1630's one might find leechlines, martnets, or neither. About 1677, a French ship was documented as attaching its leechline blocks to the fore stay collar, so that it what I did. I places the leechlines in the front side of the topsail only. I borrowed a feature found on leechlines on the course sails, when leechlines are used. A scratch built sheave in a block of wood is attached to the front side of year yard, about 2/5 of the way out form centerline. The leechlines pass through these sheaves before passing through the blocks tied to the stay collar under the top before passing down toward the deck , through the lower top, and belayed to the front rail of the forecastle. For the fore course sail below, martnets on both sides of the sail, front and back, will be used.

1189 Leechlines on Fore Topsail.jpg1190 Fore Topsail Leechlines Belayed to Rail.jpg
 
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