HMS Victory by Y.T.- Mamoli - 1:90 scale

Joined
Jul 2, 2020
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Eugene, Oregon
I use this rope walk. See picture.
View attachment 220873

The thread is this one. It’s very thin. I don’t know what its diameter is. It results into 0.2 mm diameter rope when worked from three threads.

View attachment 220874
Since then I decided I want a bit thicker rope for my cannon rigging. I made new rope of 0.27 mm diameter from 2 x 3 rope construction of same thread. See the difference.
View attachment 220875
Very nice rope production. I have a simple DIY hand cranked rope walk which produces some variations depending upon my turning consistency and the manner in which I guide the topper along setting the final lay. I have to pay attention to the direction of cranking to produce either cable or hawser laid lines.

Here is a posting that I did just after joining SoS showing my DIY rope walk down on Page 9 July 6, 2020

https://shipsofscale.com/sosforums/threads/posting-my-correct-navy-rate.5492/

with one of the very early demonstration uses before being able to walk much smaller lines than the large demonstration one in the photos.
 
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By the way on picture of gun rigging with blocks you see two different 2 mm block manufacturers. One is Russian Falconet (pear) and another is Radek's from HiS Model (walnut). Both types are very good. HiS double blocks are a bit bulkier in width due to larger holes in them. Falconet ones have very tiny holes so 0.27" mm rope would not go through. Falconet are bit more expensive.
 
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I have some observation regarding purpose of breeching tackles on naval guns. Let us look at attached pictures. I had heard and read many times that purpose of breeching tackles is to take a gun recoil during firing. Let me disagree. We can see on many pictures and photos that breeching line ends are permanently attached to the deck eyebolts therefore the line length should not change during storage, loading and firing. In order to load the gun it has to be drawn back off the deck to allow the access to the front of muzzle. Apparently at this position the breeching line has its maximum length. At firing gun is pulled forward through the port, the breaching line gets slack and is unable to take any recoil during the firing. My guess is the main and only purpose of breeching tackle is keeping the gun safely secured to the deck preventing it to get loose. The gun position is adjusted by set of three thin line tackles with sheave blocks: two on side and one at rear. The tools required to take a recoil are two handspikes (see diagram below) operated by two men. Handspikes are wedged under carriage rear wheels during the firing. What do you think?


02.jpg

01.jpg
 
Joined
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Messages
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Points
488

Location
Eugene, Oregon
I have some observation regarding purpose of breeching tackles on naval guns. Let us look at attached pictures. I had heard and read many times that purpose of breeching tackles is to take a gun recoil during firing. Let me disagree. We can see on many pictures and photos that breeching line ends are permanently attached to the deck eyebolts therefore the line length should not change during storage, loading and firing. In order to load the gun it has to be drawn back off the deck to allow the access to the front of muzzle. Apparently at this position the breeching line has its maximum length. At firing gun is pulled forward through the port, the breaching line gets slack and is unable to take any recoil during the firing. My guess is the main and only purpose of breeching tackle is keeping the gun safely secured to the deck preventing it to get loose. The gun position is adjusted by set of three thin line tackles with sheave blocks: two on side and one at rear. The tools required to take a recoil are two handspikes (see diagram below) operated by two men. Handspikes are wedged under carriage rear wheels during the firing. What do you think?


View attachment 225983

View attachment 225982
Agreed. The large recoil restraint hawser was employed either to the breech cascabel in various manners or through holes passing through the carriage. The running tackles were for moving the gun during the evolutions of loading and firing positioning. Gun crew sizes varied with weight and type of cannon/carronade but did include boys running powder and shot maintain the rate of fire. Thanks for your detailed description. Rich
 
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I like your idea for the clamp to hold the hand held drill/grinder to make your own lathe to turn the brass rods
Yes. This idea just occurred to me while I did a few pins holding the bore machine in my hand. Parts did not come out too sharp. With copper wire of proper size there was another story. I needed 1.5 mm DIA but I had only 2 mm DIA. I remembered I have this jewelers wire draw plate and managed to reduce the diameter of copper wire as required. That was my first use of jewelers wire draw plate which was collecting dust for a few years.
 
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